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Overheating Brakes?
#839954 Fri Mar 30 2012 08:00 PM
Joined: Oct 2007
Posts: 415
L
Lucille Offline OP
Shop Shark
Back in early 2010 I had Lucille's Huck brakes relined and all new SS lines, cylinders, return springs, etc installed. I had a local company burn off the old pads and then bond new pads to the old shoes. Thing is, I've got great brakes when they are cold, however, even though I feel that they are adjusted correctly with just a small amount of drag, the rear drums are overheating and locking up after about a 20 mile run. Especially the left rear. My gut is telling me that the new pads are a bit too thick. I don't have much room for adjustment. The star wheels on the wheel cylinders are turned all the way in. I don't know if it's the old backing plate not allowing the brake pads to move properly or what. I mean those return springs are unbelievably strong. So, my question, is there an easy way to just sand down the pads? And secondly, is there a material that I can apply to let those pads move better against the backing plate?

It's a pain to know that those rear brakes are heating up and having to pull over on the side of the road for a half hour to let them cool off!


"Lucille" ..... Proud Member of the "Southern Stovebolts"

David Wolff
1946 Chevy 1/2-ton
In the Gallery
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Re: Overheating Brakes?
Lucille #839963 Fri Mar 30 2012 08:45 PM
Joined: Jun 2004
Posts: 8,450
W
'Bolter
Most likely its the emergency brake cables adjusted up too tight & holding the shoes off the anchors. Its also possible the master cyl. pushrod is not adjusted correctly. It should have a little bit of play before it starts pushing on theb piston. It possible the shoes are too thick but if they are free when cold generally they dont drag like that. They are probably too thick at the edges. You can tell by the wear pattern. You can sand them down some. Wear a respirator if you do. There may be asbestos in it.


They say money can't buy happiness. It can buy old Chevy trucks though. Same thing.

1972 Chevy c10 Cheyenne Super
Re: Overheating Brakes?
Wrenchbender Ret. #840101 Sat Mar 31 2012 12:43 PM
Joined: Oct 2007
Posts: 415
L
Lucille Offline OP
Shop Shark
Thanks George, I'll check those areas out. Maybe it's a simple fix.


"Lucille" ..... Proud Member of the "Southern Stovebolts"

David Wolff
1946 Chevy 1/2-ton
In the Gallery
http://s1145.photobucket.com/albums/o510/Wolffman26/
Re: Overheating Brakes?
Lucille #840123 Sat Mar 31 2012 02:02 PM
Joined: Dec 2009
Posts: 198
H
Shop Shark
I t would be easy the take the drum to the local parts house and have it turned 0.01 or 0.02 to get the clearance. Usually it costs $10 and you don't have to take the shoes off. Same would apply to rotor.

Last edited by hankrags; Sat Mar 31 2012 02:03 PM.

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Re: Overheating Brakes?
hankrags #840197 Sat Mar 31 2012 07:07 PM
Joined: Nov 2006
Posts: 2,658
D
Shop Shark
turning the drums won't always make the arc better. If the drums have been turned the shoes may need to be arced to match the drum. what happens is only the center part of the shoe will contact surface area or the ends of the shoes will contact. when you arc the shoe the entire brake surface on the shoe will touch the drum.

Re: Overheating Brakes?
don stocker #840254 Sun Apr 01 2012 12:13 AM
Joined: Dec 2009
Posts: 198
H
Shop Shark
I am aware of the arc problem. I was referring to the overheat and lack of adjustment range. I like the e brake adjustment. Hope it helps
Had that problem myself.


1954 Chevy Half-Ton
In the Stovebolt Gallery
More pix on Shutterfly
More pix on Photobucket

1958 Chevy 1/2-Ton Stepside
In the Stovebolt Gallery
More pix on Photobucket

<> + <> + <> + <> + <>
"Time's fun when you're having flies." ~~ OLD FROG
Re: Overheating Brakes?
hankrags #840644 Mon Apr 02 2012 05:04 PM
Joined: Sep 2010
Posts: 722
J
Shop Shark
If it were the push rod on the M/C being out of adjustment he'd be heating on all 4. I'll bet he needs to rebuild the pistons on the rear - he didn't mention doing that with the brake job - but I'd check the ebrake adjustment first.


My Fleet:
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John

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Re: Overheating Brakes?
Wrenchbender Ret. #840676 Mon Apr 02 2012 07:54 PM
Joined: Oct 2007
Posts: 415
L
Lucille Offline OP
Shop Shark
Wrenchbender and all,
Well I'm slowly getting there. Both rear wheels are off with the truck being on jack stands. When I pulled the rear drums off the star adjusting wheels were almost outside of the wheel cylinders. Well, I said, that's not right! When I thought about it for awhile and figured out that the brake fluid was not returning back to the M/C. One thing I confirmed is the M/C push rod is not adjusted properly because the brake fluid if not allowed to return. The compensating port is blocked. I'm still trying to figure out exactly where the push rod adjustment should be. First I screwed it "into" the yoke that attaches itself to the brake pedal. Fantastic! Break fluid flowed back into the M/C! I then went back and adjusted the star wheels and got them in the position I thought they should be. Put the tires back on the truck and rolled her out of the garage and "wham" no breaks at all!! Brake pedal goes to the floor!!

So, what in the world is this all about? headscratch

Pushed the truck back in the garage, pulled the wheels, etc. Most everything looked OK. Made a few more adjustments with the star wheels. Then I thought it must be the adjustment on the push rod at the M/C!! Maybe I went the wrong way? So this time I unscrewed "out" of the yoke and low and behold I start getting brake pedal resistance! So right now I've put the brake drums back on, held with a couple of nuts, and the brake pedal moves about 4 inches before I can truly feel the resistance. The pedal finishes out about 3 inches from the foot board. There is no information I've been able to find about just where this push rod should be adjusted to. Do I stop at where I have it now? How can I determine if the brake fluid is flowing back to the M/C? Can I just simply remove the M/C cover and watch the fluid move or do you have to have the cover on in order for the M/C to work properly?

I do understand that brake fluid must be able to move back and forth in the system otherwise your going to overheat and lock up!

It's just this question of master cylinder push rod adjustment and just where it should be? I've also figured out that those star adjusting wheel cups have to be up against the wheel cylinder casting. For me it's so much easier to adjust those wheel cylinders and brake pads when the drums are slipped on and off to get a decent slip fit.

I'm getting there. Just need some advice on whether I'm on the right track? Wheels on, wheels off, wheels on, wheels off....that gets tiring for an "Old Guy"!! dang


"Lucille" ..... Proud Member of the "Southern Stovebolts"

David Wolff
1946 Chevy 1/2-ton
In the Gallery
http://s1145.photobucket.com/albums/o510/Wolffman26/
Re: Overheating Brakes?
Lucille #840677 Mon Apr 02 2012 08:23 PM
Joined: Jun 2004
Posts: 8,450
W
'Bolter
First did vyou replace or rebuild the master cyl. If you did not or if you rebuilt it there is a tiny hole in the rear port in the reservoir into the cyl. If this hole is plugged up it will cause problems. If you have a new master cyl. disregard this. If not poke a tag wire through it. The push rod should be adjusted so it has just a tiny bit of play before it starts pushing the piston. You can tell best from underneath. Adjust each adjuater on each wheel till you get a heavy drag & back it off about 4 notches. Remember all the adjusters are right hand threads. When these brakes are right the pedal barely goes down. You just apply pressure to it.


They say money can't buy happiness. It can buy old Chevy trucks though. Same thing.

1972 Chevy c10 Cheyenne Super
Re: Overheating Brakes?
Wrenchbender Ret. #840687 Mon Apr 02 2012 08:52 PM
Joined: Oct 2007
Posts: 415
L
Lucille Offline OP
Shop Shark
George,
The M/C is NOS. Came out of South America if I remember correctly. Everything else is new. New SS brake lines, wheel cylinders, brass connection blocks and new brake pads bonded on.
Tomorrow I'll play some more with that push rod. I'm unscrewing it out of the yoke and with a few more turns maybe I'll get that foot pedal up higher. Is there any way to easily determine if the brake fluid is returning to the M/C reservoir? Otherwise I'm concerned that my overheating issue will return.

I'll also double check all the wheel cylinders and try to get the right drag on them. Man-O-Man, it's all these "little" details that you have to look at!! Whew! eeeek


"Lucille" ..... Proud Member of the "Southern Stovebolts"

David Wolff
1946 Chevy 1/2-ton
In the Gallery
http://s1145.photobucket.com/albums/o510/Wolffman26/
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