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Re: oil filter question
#209777 Tue Jun 13 2006 12:38 AM
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 227
L
Shop Shark
And, I believe without the OPTIONAL filter, the recommended oil change interval is every 1,000 miles versus every 2,000 miles with the filter. If you're like me and you only drive it about once a week and for occasional hauling, changing the oil every 1,000 miles is no big deal.

The weight of the oil that you need to use will vary depending on the weather (okay, specifically the temperature smile ). You'll need a lighter weight oil when the temperature and the birds head south, if you live where they actually have a winter season. If you plan on working on this truck yourself, I recommend getting a repro shop manual. It should have all you need to know about performing everything from regular maintenance upto rebuilding an engine or transmission. Among the maintenance items will be recommended oil change intervals and weight of oil required, based on expected temperature range.


58 Fleetside, 235, "The Old Buckin' Bronco"
Re: oil filter question
#209778 Tue Jun 13 2006 12:52 AM
Joined: Dec 2004
Posts: 4
J
Junior Member
Psubrewno, Vintage Truck magazine has a great spot on oil filters in the August 06 issue.
I think its worth checking out.

Re: oil filter question
#209779 Tue Jun 13 2006 03:19 AM
Joined: Jul 2005
Posts: 1,162
B
Shop Shark
Quote
Originally posted by Lumbergh:
Among the maintenance items will be recommended oil change intervals and weight of oil required, based on expected temperature range.
It will also tell you about what sort of gearbox grease you should put into your gearbox and differential and when (temperature-wise).

It's nearly indispensible, that shop manual.


~#~#~#~#~
1946 Chevrolet 3600 - "Old Number Seven"

Cavalry's Here. Cavalry's a frightened guy with a rock, but it's here.
Re: oil filter question
#209780 Tue Jun 13 2006 03:03 PM
Joined: Jan 2001
Posts: 231
V
Shop Shark
You must never , _EVER_ put greasae into the tranny , rear end or steering box ! these were all designed for Hypoid 90W , you can use 80-90W Hypoid .

If your truck still has the Torque Tube you may find a Zerk fitting on top of the u-joint bell , this was for factory fill of 90W gear oil , DO NOT put grease in there ! .


-Nate
There is no problem so difficult it cannot be overcome by generous application of brute force & ignorance
Re: oil filter question
#209781 Tue Jun 13 2006 03:30 PM
Joined: Jun 2005
Posts: 125
R
Wrench Fetcher
If you want to see a shot of the oil filter set up on these trucks look at the link in my signature. The picture of the engine shows the oil filter. It's foward and outboard (in the foreground of the picture) of the carb. It looks like it has a yellow band around it. I haven't torn it apart so I can't give you specifics of the set up but that will at least give you a visual of it. Have fun with your truck and get that shop manual - it really is indispensible.


Jim Blake
Help support the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (www.lls.org) through Team in Training (www.teamintraining.org). Help put a stop to ALL cancers.

My truck: '49 3800 Stakebed/Dump
Re: oil filter question
#209782 Tue Jun 13 2006 03:35 PM
Joined: Jul 2005
Posts: 1,162
B
Shop Shark
Quote
Originally posted by vwnate1:
You must never , _EVER_ put greasae into the tranny , rear end or steering box ! these were all designed for Hypoid 90W , you can use 80-90W Hypoid .
vwnate1: I am not as stupid as I look.

80w90, 80w, and 90w are known amongst the farmers and mechanics of my area as "Gearbox Grease". Go into ANY FLAPS or Tractor/Implement supply store in northwest lower Michigan and ask for "Gearbox Grease" and they will take you right over to the area where they keep the Hypoid Lubricants.

Also: Steering boxes do not use 90w Hypoid. There was a lubricant of much higher viscosity that was widely available back then that is not so widely available now.

The only place that I know of to get it is Penrite Oil. The product is called "Steering Box Lube" and is for use in "veteran" steering boxes. They do not recommend using it in Rack and pinion setups. It is found at www.classicautolubes.com . Several 'bolters swear by it, and it costs about $12 (which includes shipping) for half a liter.

I have heard that John Deere makes a steering box lubricant that is the proper weight, but I don't know what the model number is.


~#~#~#~#~
1946 Chevrolet 3600 - "Old Number Seven"

Cavalry's Here. Cavalry's a frightened guy with a rock, but it's here.
Re: oil filter question
#209783 Tue Jun 13 2006 04:54 PM
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 227
L
Shop Shark
The steering box lubricant is a water resistant 200W "pourable" grease/oil that maintains its viscosity at relatively high temperatures (at least that's what I've read). Castrol also makes a grease for track vehicles that is supposed to work though I can't remember the name. I belive that they sell it mainly down under in Australia and New Zealand based on their website info.


58 Fleetside, 235, "The Old Buckin' Bronco"
Re: oil filter question
#209784 Thu Jun 15 2006 04:09 AM
Joined: Feb 2005
Posts: 199
A
Wrench Fetcher
A common problem (one I have had myself) is steering box leakage due to improper weight of steering box lubricant. Once I put the correct weight of lubricant in the seepage stopped.

Back to your original question, don't waste your money on the manifold mounted oil filter but rather find a full flow filter and install that on your truck and only if you plan to use it as a daily driver.

There is tons of info in the forums on both type filters and how to install them so I would suggest doing a search by clicking the search button at the top of the page type in "oil filter" and wait for the search to find your search results. You can find lots of good tips on any subject by doing a search.

My conclusion would be that a bypass filter is better than nothing but not as efficient as a full flow filter.

WELCOME TO THE BOLT!!!!! Hobert


"The Lord is my shepherd"
Re: oil filter question
#209785 Thu Jun 15 2006 06:30 AM
Joined: Sep 2004
Posts: 121
J
Member
Good to see Nate lurkin' around these parts!!! Nate, you keepin' them in line over at the Old Trucks list?

So how many Zerk fittings are on a '54 truck anyway? :p


Jim Karras
Orange, CA
'59 Chevy Apache 32 Stepside Pickup
E-mail: Jim@59apache.com
Internet: www.59apache.com
Re: oil filter question
#209786 Thu Jun 15 2006 11:53 PM
Joined: Jan 2004
Posts: 22
4
Apprentice
22 or more


Later JJ and 4
Keep the shiney side up
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