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2023 Stovebolt Calendars

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Joined: Dec 2018
Posts: 2,101
F
'Bolter
JW51 My last best hook-up for overbore stuff was from Patricks,His son was helping out for a while but think that is over. Bought some -.002 bearings from ebay that was reasonable,they are in there running. Bought a good looking solid cam, chinese lifters not so good. Had a new old stock lifter body that has about double the crown of the chinese knock-offs.

Joined: Feb 2004
Posts: 25,656
H
Kettle Custodian (pot stirrer)
Originally Posted by JW51
Gotta buy through a shop with them?

They're a warehouse wholesaler- - - -since I've either bought with my own business name or a government agency (school system) the issue of retail purchases has never come up.
Jerry


"It is better to be silent and be thought a fool than to speak and eliminate all doubt!"
Abraham Lincoln

Cringe and wail in fear, Eloi- - - - -we Morlocks are on the hunt!

There is nothing noble in being superior to your fellow man; true nobility is being superior to your former self.
Ernest Hemingway

Love your enemies and drive 'em nuts!
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 6,624
Housekeeping (Moderator) Making a Stovebolt Bed & Paint and Body Shop Forums
Originally Posted by Hotrod Lincoln
They're a warehouse wholesaler- - - -since I've either bought with my own business name or a government agency (school system) the issue of retail purchases has never come up.
Jerry
Give them a call and ask if they'll sell directly. I've bought transmission parts from a wholesaler just by walking in the door. Also from a plumbing supply warehouse where I bought a boiler and all the stuff to install it (that may have been because I was in the trade then.) They just take your money. Probably doesn't matter where it comes from.


Kevin
Newest Project - 51 Chevy 3100 work truck. Photos [flickr.com]
#2 - '29 Ford pickup restored from the ground up.
First car '29 Ford Special Coupe
Busting rust since the mid-60's
If you're smart enough to take it apart, you darn well better be smart enough to put it back together.
Joined: Feb 2001
Posts: 7,481
W
'Bolter
Here. [langdonsstovebolt.com]. Hope this helps. As per another post google what you want and you will be inundated with ads and offers.

Last edited by WE b OLD; Sat Dec 03 2022 09:00 AM.

Ron, The Computer Greek
I love therefore I am.

1960 MGA Roadster Sold 7/18/2017
1954 3100 Chevy truck in the Gallery [stovebolt.com]
2017 Buick Encore
See more pix [photos.google.com]
Joined: Jan 2014
Posts: 2,467
J
JW51 Offline OP
'Bolter
I’m not going to buy any parts until I know what oversize/undersized that’s needed.

But I was perusing the NOS bearings and rings on eBay just to get an idea of price. Came across some NOS 235 rod bearings that were supposedly “bronze.” Is that a good thing or a bad thing?

Joined: Feb 2004
Posts: 25,656
H
Kettle Custodian (pot stirrer)
All replaceable bearings I know about are multi-layer, a steel backing, then a layer of copper or some other alloy, then Babbit, and finally a microscopic top layer of pure tin to allow the bearing to "wear in" to the exact shape of the crankshaft during the first minutes of operation. All the other terms are just advertising copy, thought up by someone who has never had his hands on a wrench!
Jerry


"It is better to be silent and be thought a fool than to speak and eliminate all doubt!"
Abraham Lincoln

Cringe and wail in fear, Eloi- - - - -we Morlocks are on the hunt!

There is nothing noble in being superior to your fellow man; true nobility is being superior to your former self.
Ernest Hemingway

Love your enemies and drive 'em nuts!
Joined: Apr 2005
Posts: 37
5
'Bolter
Northern Auto parts in Iowa has various engine kits and will put one together for you if not one of their standard kits. Prices seem reasonable, customer service will actually talk to you.

https://www.northernautoparts.com/


Mike
Joined: Jan 2014
Posts: 2,467
J
JW51 Offline OP
'Bolter
Anyone have a strong opinion on piston ring materials/coatings?

* Seems like cast rings are adequate for most applications, and break-in easily
* I think one of the Hastings sets has a chrome top ring. I’ve heard very favorable and very unfavorable reviews of chrome piston rings.
* I’ve yet to find anyone who sells a moly coated ring for a 235

Joined: Feb 2004
Posts: 25,656
H
Kettle Custodian (pot stirrer)
From the perspective of 60+ years' experience building engines, the material a ring is made of has a lot less impact on a successful job than the condition of the cylinder it's being installed into, and the preparation the cylinder gets prior to engine assembly. Most of the exotic material rings were developed to compensate for them being installed in tapered bores, or improperly honed cylinders. At 2K RPM, a ring running in a taper-worn cylinder is flexing 60 times per second to try to maintain a seal with the cylinder wall. To do that, rings were developed with lots of spring tension, and it was necessary to incorporate a self-lubricating material (Moly) or a hard chrome facing to minimize friction wear. A straight (rebored) cylinder with no taper stops ring flexing, and also eliminates the need for exotic ring materials. Proper cross hatch honing creates the right conditions for quick ring seating, and the crosshatch also traps a microscopic layer of oil to keep the rings and piston skirts lubricated during ring break-in.

Some engine blocks such as the Hudson inline sixes and some of the early Ford OHV V8's had such a high nickel content that a chrome ring simply refused to seat. Those blocks also wore at such a slow rate that a re-ring job didn't need to have the block bored and new pistons fitted. GM has always used a much softer (less expensive) alloy in their block castings, so a rebuild with chrome rings resulted in pretty good ring seating, but at the expense of rapid cylinder taper wear.
Jerry


"It is better to be silent and be thought a fool than to speak and eliminate all doubt!"
Abraham Lincoln

Cringe and wail in fear, Eloi- - - - -we Morlocks are on the hunt!

There is nothing noble in being superior to your fellow man; true nobility is being superior to your former self.
Ernest Hemingway

Love your enemies and drive 'em nuts!
Joined: Mar 2014
Posts: 3,196
J
'Bolter
I'm old now and can't fight as well as I could when I was young, but it would take somebody like Ali in his prime to make me ever put another top chrome ring in anything. And he would have his work cut out for him. Cast rings are very good for a 235. They begin breaking in when you start running the engine (if your machinist knew what he was doing when he honed your cylinders). Talk to Jerry about that...he knows it chapter and verse. I've never had good results using chrome rings...and I tried them in many engines in the 60s and 70s. Everyone thought these were the answer. Also, find a machinist who can and will bore your cylinders correctly. To do this correctly each piston must be bored and marked for each cylinder...and please use the GM specs for both piston clearance and ring gap. Once again Jerry has forgotten more about this than many people have ever learned. I've seen some engines that were bored so incorrectly they were going to run like an engine with over 25,000 miles on it right from the start. Another thing is your crankshaft. Have it ground by somebody who knows EXACTLY what they're doing. Mistakes are very bad and expensive to fix. The 235 is ok at .020 over. At .030 over...well you can do it, but you won't find too many people getting on that bandwagon. You'll find those crankshafts being used to hold up mailboxes on farm to market roads. If you get your crankshaft ground so that your main and rod bearings run at the lowest end of the GM specs, you'll be a much happier guy. Good luck!


Jon

1952 1/2 ton with 1959 235
T5 with 3.07 rear end
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