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Joined: Apr 2002
Posts: 2,133
F
Fox Offline OP
A teacher, but always an apprentice.
Thanks Phil.

I love this bench, too. It gets used everyday. Campfires, doing little jobs on it while the kids play. I have had my mother, sisters, and brother all request I build them one. My mom pointed to the Custom 20 parts truck tailgate and said, “I want that one.”

So much for selling that truck complete...😎 I’d rather find other gates for those projects. It would be a sweet candidate for a bench though!

In the meantime:
I cut, hammered, welded, and grinded out the old gas filler hole. I slapped some epoxy on it and will give it a small coat of filler before the high build primer goes on. This went well.

I next pulled out the shiny, new, chrome rear bumper in preparation for mock up. Installed the brackets and immediately ran into reproduction parts rearing their ugly heads. The brackets that attach to the main frame rails hit on the rear cross sill. This in turn prohibits one from lining up the bolt holes. So...out came my die grinder. I had to incorporate relief cuts above the brackets on the cross sill so I could get the bolts lined up and secured. I only got 1 side done so far. I hope to wrap that up tomorrow and hang a bumper to see what it will look like.


Hours: 438

I’ll snap some photos later.


Update. The main rear bumper brackets clear all well and fine, but I think I need to pie cut and bend the outer brackets as the angle of “bolt up” is off quite a bit on the bumper. Pie cut, heat and bend, check fit, weld her back up, and install.

Be sure to cover the chrome bumper before tack welding, Fox!

Write that down, kids.

Attached Images
F44B2067-B18F-43A0-8295-591598306D96.jpeg (178.73 KB, 216 downloads)
74D5CBF4-5AD5-42E4-87B6-D8C3FF730CD7.jpeg (143.84 KB, 216 downloads)
4F114020-C315-411C-8362-890B08A85D16.jpeg (143.88 KB, 214 downloads)
8C485F90-BE31-4061-9A77-391CB081885B.jpeg (250.98 KB, 214 downloads)
Last edited by Fox; Sun Jul 24 2022 04:41 AM.

In the Stovebolt Gallery [stovebolt.com]
More pictures here [photos.app.goo.gl]

1951 GMC 9430 1 ton dually—-Shiny!

1970 Chevrolet C10 - Grandpa’s- My first truck.—in progress to shiny
1972 Chevrolet C20- Rusty- the puzzle box lid for the C10.
1950 Chevrolet 1300- in progress to shiny.
1962 AMC Rambler American- my wife’s

Parts trucks-
1951 GMC 9300
1951-GMC 9430
1951- Chevrolet 1300
Joined: Apr 2002
Posts: 2,133
F
Fox Offline OP
A teacher, but always an apprentice.
I finished sanding out the bed wood. I also had to build a couple of support mounts for the lower mounting points of the front outer fenders. Originally, the trucks had a little indented spacer/washer thingy jig. I attempted to pull the two from the C20 parts truck, but rust defeated me. They were solid chunks of rust. So, I built my own using some pipe and 1/8” plate. I hope they work well enough.

I will be attempting one more shot at the original LH door. The reproduction door was also too NARROW as well as the vent window angle being wrong. I know you’re sick of hearing about what I’m going to do, imagine how I feel! One last attempt at a lower patch panel. Fingers crossed.

I dug out the big blaster today and started stripping paint and rust off the fenders, since I have to wait on parts for the door repair. They have to be stripped eventually is my thinking. May as well do it while it is still nice outside. As I blasted, I noticed quite a few new repairs that need to be done in addition to touch ups on repairs I had done already.

Eg:
Better penetration on some welds.

Fix battery tray rust.

Pinholes on the lower, front of the LH fender. I thought it would be ok...nope. Fairly large surgery, again...

Inner fender rust holes on a double layered area. Who knew?🙄

I am forgetting a couple things as well, but as
always: 3 steps forward, 2 back!

Hours :
444

PS:
Also had a fiasco with my compressor.’I went to use it one day and it went Urch at start up. It did this a few years ago and it was the pressure switch. I was crabby as other things were irritating me that day/week and did not need that when it was my wrenching time. My parents had taken my kids for the day, my wife was working, grr.

So I assumed ( I know, I know...*ss) it was the pressure switch. I tore up to the city (1:15 one way) and got two switches(one for the future just in case), and came home. My air compressor was torn apart, it was 30°C, crabby, put it all back together and blah. Nothing. Grrrrrrr. I tested the motor. It was good. I didn’t want to pull the compressor, so I followed the cord to the wall. Unplugged it. Tried the welder in the wall plugin. It worked.

Turns out the bloody compressor end plug wires had come loose inside the plugin housing.

I was so bloody angry that day. All day.

Rant over. But hey, at least I have a couple extra pressure switches now, and lots of rust to fix on fenders.

Ugh. So, you want to restore trucks, do ya?!
Things are looking up now though.

Attached Images
752168CB-6D55-46EF-B11E-3C41165FD17F.jpeg (250.12 KB, 200 downloads)
E4B4F270-2851-4874-A882-CE6848E02F9C.jpeg (371.71 KB, 198 downloads)
Last edited by Fox; Fri Aug 12 2022 03:42 AM.

In the Stovebolt Gallery [stovebolt.com]
More pictures here [photos.app.goo.gl]

1951 GMC 9430 1 ton dually—-Shiny!

1970 Chevrolet C10 - Grandpa’s- My first truck.—in progress to shiny
1972 Chevrolet C20- Rusty- the puzzle box lid for the C10.
1950 Chevrolet 1300- in progress to shiny.
1962 AMC Rambler American- my wife’s

Parts trucks-
1951 GMC 9300
1951-GMC 9430
1951- Chevrolet 1300
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 2,953
AD Addict
Keep at it Fox, you almost got it beat!


Phil
Moderator, The Engine Shop & Interiors

1952 Chevrolet 3100
Project Journals
Stovebolt Gallery Forum

‘59 235 w/hydraulic lifters
“Three on the Tree” & 4:11 torque tube
12v w/ Alternator
Joined: Apr 2002
Posts: 2,133
F
Fox Offline OP
A teacher, but always an apprentice.
Just got back from a week long fly-in fishing trip in northern Saskatchewan. What a great time! One young fella there landed a 42lb lake trout. He had trouble lifting it. What a monster! Everett and I caught some “medium” pike (36”-13lbs) and a 38” trout of our own. Every outing everyday fish were on the line in numbers. I guess it kind of spoils a guy fishing here as most lakes here are overfished and have nothing like those fish left in them any longer. It was a great break. (PM me if you want more lodge details 😉)

I got a little bit done today on the C10:

E brake cable clips and rods blasted and painted.
Battery tray rust repaired and ground smooth.
RH fender delamination welded up.
Prior rust repair on RH fender penetration rewelded and hammer/dollied.
Collapsible steering shaft disassembled, blasted and painted. Awaiting to reassemble.

It was a good day wrenching.

Hours: 446

Attached Images
976FD8F7-A1CE-44E7-956C-DD97F872665C.jpeg (249.94 KB, 173 downloads)
6AA6DF53-EBBE-413E-9F06-7B1135470E15.jpeg (230.59 KB, 172 downloads)
36497C11-8E57-4836-9CBB-C911EAF95982.jpeg (387.71 KB, 156 downloads)
B9249ED2-F0D8-47F3-BA82-70B490B07986.jpeg (355.68 KB, 157 downloads)
Last edited by Fox; Sun Aug 28 2022 04:58 AM.

In the Stovebolt Gallery [stovebolt.com]
More pictures here [photos.app.goo.gl]

1951 GMC 9430 1 ton dually—-Shiny!

1970 Chevrolet C10 - Grandpa’s- My first truck.—in progress to shiny
1972 Chevrolet C20- Rusty- the puzzle box lid for the C10.
1950 Chevrolet 1300- in progress to shiny.
1962 AMC Rambler American- my wife’s

Parts trucks-
1951 GMC 9300
1951-GMC 9430
1951- Chevrolet 1300
Joined: Jan 2013
Posts: 1,685
S
'Bolter
Good god, I would of called BS on this but you made my day with the pictures.


1953 Chevrolet 3100
261 cu inch, sm420, 3.55 rear, torque tube still,omaha orange, still 6 volt, RPO green glass, side carrier spare, all done
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bli...n05i04t1aokgm4p04jiwgffwhyyih5xbk0h00410
1964 GMC 1000
305 Big Block V6, sm420, the next cab off restoration
Joined: Apr 2002
Posts: 2,133
F
Fox Offline OP
A teacher, but always an apprentice.
Stock, I just looked at the lodge’s Facebook page and you should see the fish they caught this week. They make mine look like minnows. It is ridiculous up there. If interested, check out fishcreelake.com.

I saw a video recently of a ‘63 Comet that had 1000+hp and no emergency brakes! Well, a nasty wreck ensued when the brakes failed during filming of this ride for a tv show. “You gotta be able to whoa before you go.” Nobody was killed, but yeesh…they all got lucky.

So I figured I’d mock up the e brake cable since I have everything ready now. Turns out that, with the LS/LM7 exhaust going through the crossmember, the 4l60e trans and trans mount, catalytic converters, and my exhaust hangers, I had to improvise a little bit. Instead of running the cable through the little grommeted hole in the crossmember, I had to build 2 little guides underneath it to have the cable activate smoothly. The guides are scrap 1” pipe I had lying around. I beveled the inner circumference of the pipe to 1/2 the wall thickness. It was smooth after this and even smoother after I sanded it down some with 220. I welded them on at a slight angle to line up better on both ends of the pipe. They ride on the guide, but it shouldn’t be an issue. A little touch up paint and wooo doggy. If attempted in the stock position, the cable is too short because of interference. A couple hours of thinking and figuring and I think I have it licked. I jacked up the rear, adjusted the shoes, and tried it out. The pedal locks up hard about 1/2 way through its stroke, and I still have lots of adjustment left on the parking brake cable if need be. All in all, I’m happy.

Hours:448

Attached Images
Last edited by Fox; Tue Sep 06 2022 04:54 AM.

In the Stovebolt Gallery [stovebolt.com]
More pictures here [photos.app.goo.gl]

1951 GMC 9430 1 ton dually—-Shiny!

1970 Chevrolet C10 - Grandpa’s- My first truck.—in progress to shiny
1972 Chevrolet C20- Rusty- the puzzle box lid for the C10.
1950 Chevrolet 1300- in progress to shiny.
1962 AMC Rambler American- my wife’s

Parts trucks-
1951 GMC 9300
1951-GMC 9430
1951- Chevrolet 1300
Joined: Apr 2002
Posts: 2,133
F
Fox Offline OP
A teacher, but always an apprentice.
So I began to modify the dash to accept the air conditioning vents I am installing. The Old Air Products a/c unit I purchased was sent with the under dash rectangular pieces that, in my opinion, look like a terrible afterthought. My supplier simply made a mistake, so I began looking for original style vents. I found some on Summit. They had the left and right kit and the centre vent came separately. These are Vintage Air products. Oh, don’t worry about the pieces playing nice; that’s not where this story is going.


I began marking and laying out the side vent cuts. I was nervous of course, because you have to cut a 3.5” hole in the dash beside the gauges and glovebox. But my fear was baseless. Everything went well on the sides.

The centre vent however was a different story. Since it was a separate piece it didn’t come with instructions. So I went on to Vintage Air’s website to find some. I found some instructions for a 67-72 C10 WITHOUT factory air & installing FACTORY style vents.
Golden? Just wait. I began to mark out the cut lines above the radio and my spider sense was tingling. Something wasn’t quite right. With the dash pad, radio, and dash curvature, perhaps Vintage knew something I did not. So I ignored my gut and went with Vintage’s instructions… for a 67-72 C10 WITHOUT factory air installing FACTORY style vents.

This is where I got mad. Trust your gut sometimes, fellas. Turns out the cut was in the wrong spot. I had to be about 3/4” lower. C’mon Peter Parker, trust that spider sense. Because of this error, I had a substantial gap ABOVE the centre vent in the dash. ARGGGGGH! So my little 1 hour job of drilling some holes turned into a fabrication session where I had to make a patch panel, weld it in, metal finish it, and then recut the opening. 4 hours later…

If someone had done this on a finished dash, could you imagine?! I am also lucky because I have the ability to fix a ridiculous mistake like this. A little epoxy, skim of filler, paint, the vent installed, dash pad installed, the repair will be invisible. I had the pad on when my wife checked in.

“I don’t see the big problem and why you were so mad.”

“Perfect, that’s how it should be,” I replied.


Hours: 452

Attached Images
3A535768-C8D7-4108-A297-ECDAB0E3D477.jpeg (230.06 KB, 120 downloads)
EF24AB4D-0FED-49E1-8BCA-99D4220D0629.jpeg (184.31 KB, 123 downloads)
Last edited by Fox; Tue Sep 06 2022 04:53 AM.

In the Stovebolt Gallery [stovebolt.com]
More pictures here [photos.app.goo.gl]

1951 GMC 9430 1 ton dually—-Shiny!

1970 Chevrolet C10 - Grandpa’s- My first truck.—in progress to shiny
1972 Chevrolet C20- Rusty- the puzzle box lid for the C10.
1950 Chevrolet 1300- in progress to shiny.
1962 AMC Rambler American- my wife’s

Parts trucks-
1951 GMC 9300
1951-GMC 9430
1951- Chevrolet 1300
Joined: Apr 2002
Posts: 2,133
F
Fox Offline OP
A teacher, but always an apprentice.
Today I was able to hit the shop pretty hard. I first tidied just a bit to get ready for the day then accomplished the following:

1:LH front inner fender rust holes cut out, welded, finished. I initially started on one spot, but then I found another where the lower outer fender bolts to the inner. So, I had to cut that out too. Then I cut back some more as I was having issues with the thin steel and the patch.

2: I pulled out my old hvlp paint guns and disassembled the little one for priming the inside of the new door skin for the left hand side. It was a little sticky after sitting for 3 years or so. Good to go.

3. I then ground down the original LH door skin edges and removed it.

4. I had already epoxied the original inner door a couple years ago, so it was ready for the surgery. But since I was going to prime the outer skin, I decided to paint the inner skin black over the epoxy.

5. Removed leftover spot welds from the inner door panel.

6. Cleaned, wire wheeled the inner door panel in prep for primer.

7. Sprayed the outer door skin panel with epoxy.

8. Blasted and painted the mounting brackets and spacers for the A/C stuff under hood.

It was a good day.

Hours: 458

I also included a picture of the little farm welding trailer Dad and I flanged up from “freebies”. It can go behind the quad if needed. Pretty handy little unit!

Attached Images
Last edited by Fox; Tue Sep 06 2022 04:51 AM.

In the Stovebolt Gallery [stovebolt.com]
More pictures here [photos.app.goo.gl]

1951 GMC 9430 1 ton dually—-Shiny!

1970 Chevrolet C10 - Grandpa’s- My first truck.—in progress to shiny
1972 Chevrolet C20- Rusty- the puzzle box lid for the C10.
1950 Chevrolet 1300- in progress to shiny.
1962 AMC Rambler American- my wife’s

Parts trucks-
1951 GMC 9300
1951-GMC 9430
1951- Chevrolet 1300
Joined: Apr 2002
Posts: 2,133
F
Fox Offline OP
A teacher, but always an apprentice.
A couple nights ago I installed the brackets and spacers for the Old Air AC compressor on the LS/LM7 engine. The tensioner was quite tight to get the belt on, but I got it.

Later that evening, I decided to remove the stock GM bracket from the engine that held the old AC compressor. I installed it because I wasn’t sure if it would need to be on there later. Well, I began removing bolts and got to the last one and discovered that I was unable to back it out all the way because the 73-87 frame engine mount was too close to the Dirty Dingo LS engine mounts. Also, the bracket wouldn’t slip over the last little bit holding it on. Frick. Then I couldn’t get it to rethread into the block. Well, truth be told, I really wanted it gone for sake of tidiness, so I began to examine more closely. Turned out I would have had to pull the cab, the exhaust, then the engine and trans (or lift 3-4 inches) in order to remove this ONE bolt.


Screw that. In the end, I laid on my back for 30 minutes with my die grinder, a long pencil rotary file/rasp in the chuck, and proceeded to turn that bolt head into filings. The die grinder barely reached/fit but I was able to dust that head and remove the bolt and the bracket. After it clanged to the floor, I booted it across the shop floor and barked something that rhymes with muck moo at the bolt and bracket. Grrrrr.

Progress. 🤔

Hours: 460


PS: I have also test run my pneumatic door skinning tool. It cost a penny for sure, but I’m glad I won’t be doing this whole job by hammer and dolly. I have shown a few buddies and I think there may be some more use coming its way.

Attached Images
Last edited by Fox; Sat Sep 17 2022 03:57 AM.

In the Stovebolt Gallery [stovebolt.com]
More pictures here [photos.app.goo.gl]

1951 GMC 9430 1 ton dually—-Shiny!

1970 Chevrolet C10 - Grandpa’s- My first truck.—in progress to shiny
1972 Chevrolet C20- Rusty- the puzzle box lid for the C10.
1950 Chevrolet 1300- in progress to shiny.
1962 AMC Rambler American- my wife’s

Parts trucks-
1951 GMC 9300
1951-GMC 9430
1951- Chevrolet 1300
Joined: Apr 2002
Posts: 2,133
F
Fox Offline OP
A teacher, but always an apprentice.
I have been hitting the door skin lately. It has had its ups and downs. To begin with I had to add a little steel along the inner door’s front edge near the bottom. The inner lower tub reproduction was a little off, as you can see in the pictures prior. This was no big deal. Then, I began to drill plug weld holes along the outer skin replacement. I clamped it in place using scribes I’d put before the original’s removal, then tacked it solid before I removed the door to fold it all over. I tacked the corners and began to fold over the corner lips to try out the door skinning tool.

It all went great until it didn’t.

As mentioned above the tool is great, but be bloody careful as you can wreck stuff quickly.

The leading and trailing edges of the door went great. The door bottom had a hiccup.

If you attempt a door skin job with this Astro DS1000 door skinning tool, DON’T drill the plug weld holes first. As I moved along the bottom lip, I noticed that the holes caused weak points and the metal wouldn’t move as easily and would distort outward. This gave me little “tabs/puckers” that stuck down because of the uneven pressure and kinking at the plug weld holes.

Also, as I moved along the bottom, the above issue also caused the tool to go off track, inadvertently folding the steel over, but missing the inner tub lip. This in turn caused the tool to kink the outer door skin slightly, giving me a very slight concave depression just above the lower lip. I removed some steel on the inner edge of the outer lower lip, worked the kink a bit, then welded over an extension to get back on the inner tub.

What a pain. It’s even worse because, as I was moving on the lower edge, my gut told me something was amiss and I should switch to doing it by hand and dolly. Hindsight is irritating to say the least.🤷🏼‍♂️

The photos show the highs and lows, but they actually aren’t that bad. A 1/16” of filler and I should be ok. I am lucky that the very bottom of the panel’s edge doesn’t wave up and down, so I can build a very good, strong skim of filler along that edge. It’s good because the filler won’t actually be on the edge this way. I’m still fine tuning but this door is finally fitting the way I want it to. A pillar gap= good, rear door gap= good, window frame gap=good, lower gap= very workable, leading edge gap= to be determined once front sheet metal is hung.

Hours 465

👍🏻🦊👍🏻

Attached Images
Last edited by Fox; Tue Oct 04 2022 05:08 AM.

In the Stovebolt Gallery [stovebolt.com]
More pictures here [photos.app.goo.gl]

1951 GMC 9430 1 ton dually—-Shiny!

1970 Chevrolet C10 - Grandpa’s- My first truck.—in progress to shiny
1972 Chevrolet C20- Rusty- the puzzle box lid for the C10.
1950 Chevrolet 1300- in progress to shiny.
1962 AMC Rambler American- my wife’s

Parts trucks-
1951 GMC 9300
1951-GMC 9430
1951- Chevrolet 1300
Page 19 of 20 1 2 17 18 19 20

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