The Stovebolt.com Forums Home | FAQ | Gallery | Tech Tips | Events | Features | Search
Getting back to business
First round of holidays is about over. A few weeks before the next ones. For some of us...

Winter is Coming
Time to think about wintering your Bolt.
(continued)

A good Tech Tip
WINTERIZING YOUR TRUCK
including a link back to the Forums for some new thoughts.

Searching the Site

Get info about how to search the entire Stovebolt site here. To do a search for just the forums, get those details in the IT Shortbus fourm.
Old Truck Calendars
In the works
Nothing like an old truck calendar

2023 Stovebolt Calendars

Check for details!


Who's Online Now
16 members (69Cuda, Marty_in_Mesa, 2ManyTrucks, AaronCan2, KEVINSKI, 1 invisible), 145 guests, and 3 robots.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Forum Statistics
Forums60
Topics127,668
Posts1,046,517
Members46,401
Most Online1,229
Jan 21st, 2020
Step-by-step instructions for pictures in the forums
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2
Joined: Jan 2014
Posts: 2,345
J
JW51 Offline OP
'Bolter
Planning to do this tonight. First time with a repair sleeve. The videos I’ve seen are just someone tapping it on gently and evenly with the supplied “driver” cup thing.

A couple thoughts I’ve had beyond that basic procedure:

1) Would it be good to stick the yoke in the freezer and warm up the sleeve a bit? Make it slide on a bit easier and perhaps more evenly?

2) Anyone add loctite to this job?

Or do I just tap the thing on room temp and dry and forget about it?

Joined: Feb 2000
Posts: 4,566
J
'Bolter
Most just hammer them on and go, I have used loc-tite and have just hammered them on, didn't make any difference either way. Clean and smooth the yoke seal surface best you can, the smoother it is, the better the sleeve will go on. I've had to buy two sleeves when the first one got stuck 1/2 way, a press would be good to have or threaded rod, washers, and a couple nuts to press it into place. Some go on pretty easy, some will fight you.

Joined: Mar 2014
Posts: 3,147
J
'Bolter
I've seen people do this both ways...with Loctite and without. Those who didn't add any Loctite told me they thought it was ok since the rear end wasn't under pressure, didn't run anywhere as hot as the engine and the lubrication inside was tremendously thicker. Personally I've used Loctite always, but I could be over-cautious. As for chilling/heating, I doubt you'll need to do that but you can if you desire. I wouldn't worry about heating the sleeve...too thin, not enough mass to matter and all that. The driving cup makes installation usually go along swimmingly. Unless you bought one that was too tight or (and this is kind of important) you left any sort of protrusion or roughness on the yoke. I saw a fellow split one years ago and it was because he hadn't checked the piece first and there was a small bit of something that caused it to rip as it was installed.


Jon

1952 1/2 ton with 1959 235
T5 with 3.07 rear end
Joined: Jun 2004
Posts: 8,595
W
'Bolter
I always used RTV on them. It acts as a lubricant & sealer.
George


They say money can't buy happiness. It can buy old Chevy trucks though. Same thing.

1972 Chevy c10 Cheyenne Super
Joined: Mar 2019
Posts: 1,440
G
'Bolter
Well i did a sleeve and seal installation on an eaton ho72 with sealer. But low and behold, something wasn't right, because i have to take it apart again. Seems to be leaking more now than it did with the brick hard, cracked and broken seal i took out..Ill let cha know what i find.

Joined: Mar 2019
Posts: 1,440
G
'Bolter
Well i took it apart yesterday. Not really sure whats up with it. Note that i did not drain it. Heres what i found then did. Splines on the pinion were bone dry. New seal looked fine and spring is still in there. Sleeve looked like it had a very small "bump" on it. Couldn't really see it, but could feel it with my finger. Must of happened during initial installation? I at that point removed the sleeve. I used emery cloth on the yoke and looks good. I made a gasket for the seal retainer and used a super thin layer of rvt on retainer side of the gasket. I did this in case it needs to come back apart, hopefully not, so i wont have to clean the mating surface again. I also used a thin layer of rtv on the seal where it meets the retainer just in case. Note... i let the fuid level settle down to the bottom of the return hole and stopped dripping. But when i now checked the fluid level with my finger at the fill plug, its excessively low. I have not installed the yoke yet. Curious on howhigh the level should be to the seal when parked? Im not sure if filling the level to the bottom of fill plug, which is what i think it should be, contributed to my leak because the seal was overwhelmed? Ideas?

To op, Hope this headache of an experience helps you out on your repair also.

Last edited by glenns towing; Thu Sep 22 2022 05:51 PM. Reason: forgot something
Joined: Jan 2014
Posts: 2,345
J
JW51 Offline OP
'Bolter
Not sure what truck you’re working on. I think the 47-53 manual says to have it 1/2 inch below the full plug. In my experience, that’s pretty tough to achieve, and I end up filling to the hole.

Others can advise on their procedure.

Joined: Mar 2019
Posts: 1,440
G
'Bolter
Sorry. My application is a 63 gmc chassis with ho72. No worries. Its back together. Filled to just short of the fill hole. Aint leaking sitting there, but haven't road tested it yet.

Last edited by glenns towing; Thu Sep 22 2022 09:33 PM. Reason: added something
Joined: Feb 2004
Posts: 25,334
H
Kettle Custodian (pot stirrer)
Jack up a wheel off the floor a little, put the axle housing on a jack stand, and "road test" without having to leave the shop. You can watch for a leak better that way, too!
Jerry


"It is better to be silent and be thought a fool than to speak and eliminate all doubt!"
Abraham Lincoln

Cringe and wail in fear, Eloi- - - - -we Morlocks are on the hunt!

There is nothing noble in being superior to your fellow man; true nobility is being superior to your former self.
Ernest Hemingway

WAG MORE- - - - - -BARK LESS!
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 2,967
AD Addict
Originally Posted by JW51
1) Would it be good to stick the yoke in the freezer and warm up the sleeve a bit? Make it slide on a bit easier and perhaps more evenly?

2) Anyone add loctite to this job?

Or do I just tap the thing on room temp and dry and forget about it?

Chilling the yoke and heating the sleeve would not help because the sleeve is so thin, it would almost immediately conduct the cold from the yoke, which has allot more mass.


Phil
Moderator, The Engine Shop & Interiors

1952 Chevrolet 3100
Project Journals
Stovebolt Gallery Forum

‘59 235 w/hydraulic lifters
“Three on the Tree” & 4:11 torque tube
12v w/ Alternator
Page 1 of 2 1 2

Moderated by  SWEET 

Link Copied to Clipboard
Home | FAQ | Gallery | Tech Tips | Events | Features | Search | Hoo-Ya Shop
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.5