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Redbird #1461500 Fri Aug 05 2022 05:31 PM
Joined: Jul 2022
Posts: 33
R
Redbird Offline OP
'Bolter
Do these shoot oil all over when setting the valves? I'm used to doing sbc and have the little clips on the rockers

Redbird #1461503 Fri Aug 05 2022 07:15 PM
Joined: Feb 2004
Posts: 24,733
H
Kettle Custodian (pot stirrer)
There is no reason to attempt to adjust valves on a running engine of any kind, 6 cylinder, V8, or any other style, solid or hydraulic lifters. If the engine has solid lifters, get it warmed up, shut it down, and use the companion cylinder method of establishing top dead center on each compression stroke. All 12 valves can be set with two turns of the engine and they'll be accurate- - - -no mess, and it's done right the first time. Adjustable hydraulic lifters are set cold, with the engine stopped, by anyone who understands basic tuning procedures.
Jerry


"Freedom's just another word for nothing left to lose"
Kris Kristofferson

Cringe and wail in fear, Eloi- - - - -we Morlocks are on the hunt!

There is nothing noble in being superior to your fellow man; true nobility is being superior to your former self.
Ernest Hemingway

WAG MORE- - - - - -BARK LESS!
Redbird #1461504 Fri Aug 05 2022 07:15 PM
Joined: Aug 2018
Posts: 382
D
'Bolter
Redbird... answering both posts, questions:

First, no, the oiling is just a light drip when the engine is running. There is very little oil pressure to the rockers in a '54 235. Just enough oiling to keep things wet, so not at all like an SBC. Choice is to set the valve clearances with engine off, paying attention to the where in the rotation the engine is while working through each valve, so that it's clear when the lifter is on the low portion of its cam.

If you go to the forum's Tech Tips and scroll down to the section labelled Engine, you will find this tip on valve adjustment that explains the procedure: Valve Adjustment. This is my preferred method, FWIW.

BTW, I strongly recommend you browse through the forum's tech tips, as you will find many answers to your questions, electrical, mechanical, body... lots of good info.

Or, you can set the valves with the engine running, using feeler gauges. No clips needed (and nothing to clip them to!).
Sort of takes three hands, but with practice it's a fine way to set the valves, just not my preferred method. And, the procedure is not like a typical hydraulic lifter SBC. This engine has solid lifters.

To your earlier question, the T54Z is a passenger car "Blue Flame" 235, originally mated to a standard transmission, and rated at 115HP.

Doug

Last edited by drdoug; Fri Aug 05 2022 07:19 PM.
Redbird #1461619 Sat Aug 06 2022 08:32 PM
Joined: Jul 2022
Posts: 33
R
Redbird Offline OP
'Bolter
Thank you guys for all your help. I am trying to get used to the forum format. The Corvette Forum and TriFive Forum are a lot different. I will try to get the valves done this week. I have already ordered parts from Rock Auto & Classic Parts USA.

Redbird #1461623 Sat Aug 06 2022 09:47 PM
Joined: Feb 2004
Posts: 24,733
H
Kettle Custodian (pot stirrer)
Stovebolts have a nasty habit of wearing a dimple in the tips of the rocker arms where they contact the valve stems. That usually results in a noisy valve train because the true clearance can't be set with a feeler gauge, or a chewed-up feeler gauge if it's inserted between the rocker and the valve with the engine running. Some valve grinding machines have an accessory designed to reface rocker arms, but there's a lot of controversy about how accurate a radius can be done that way. In my decidedly biased opinion, a smooth rocker tip is better than one with a big hole in it regardless of how technically accurate it might be.
Jerry


"Freedom's just another word for nothing left to lose"
Kris Kristofferson

Cringe and wail in fear, Eloi- - - - -we Morlocks are on the hunt!

There is nothing noble in being superior to your fellow man; true nobility is being superior to your former self.
Ernest Hemingway

WAG MORE- - - - - -BARK LESS!
Joined: Mar 2010
Posts: 10,150
5
'Bolter
Originally Posted by Hotrod Lincoln
Stovebolts have a nasty habit of wearing a dimple in the tips of the rocker arms where they contact the valve stems. That usually results in a noisy valve train because the true clearance can't be set with a feeler gauge, or a chewed-up feeler gauge if it's inserted between the rocker and the valve with the engine running. Some valve grinding machines have an accessory designed to reface rocker arms, but there's a lot of controversy about how accurate a radius can be done that way. In my decidedly biased opinion, a smooth rocker tip is better than one with a big hole in it regardless of how technically accurate it might be.
Jerry

I have had good results by using a bench grinder with a very fine grit wheel with a steady hand, keeping the rocker surface aligned with the wheel, and rolled the rocker as best as I could to match the curved surface. I checked progress after every pass.
The nice thing was, the divot in the rocker arm followed the same radius as the original unworn surface, so all I had to do was roll the rocker arm and remove metal so that, as it went away, its contour matched that of the divot until there was only a minute amount of the divot remaining.
I then switched to cloth polishing wheel loaded with jeweler's rouge until the divot was gone.

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