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Irwin Arnstein working on his
1959 Chevy 1-Ton


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#1460573 Fri Jul 29 2022 12:34 AM
Joined: Jul 2022
Posts: 33
R
Redbird Offline OP
'Bolter
How do you remove the Gas/fuel gauge. I have new one to install. Anybody have step-by-step or photos?

Joined: Mar 2014
Posts: 2,998
J
'Bolter
What year, style, etc? There are some differences...


Jon

1952 1/2 ton with 1959 235
T5 with 3.07 rear end
Joined: Jul 2022
Posts: 33
R
Redbird Offline OP
'Bolter
1953 Here is a picture.

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Joined: May 2015
Posts: 5,616
Housekeeping (Moderator) Making a Stovebolt Bed & Paint and Body Shop Forums
4 studs attach the gauge cluster to the dash. The nuts that hold the cluster in area accessed from the back of the dash, then the cluster comes out from the back.Once it's out, you'll see that replacing the gas gauge is pretty simple.

Here's a couple photos of the cluster in various stages of disassembly. You can see the tabs that attach the cluster to the dash. The gauges are held in place by screws from the back in most cases. You'll see how once you get the cluster out.

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Kevin
Newest Project - 51 Chevy 3100 work truck. Photos [flickr.com]
#2 - '29 Ford pickup restored from the ground up.
First car '29 Ford Special Coupe
Busting rust since the mid-60's
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 2,635
P
AD Addict
The bezel is crimped in a few spots which holds the assembly together. Using a small screwdriver, carefully pry open the crimps. Once the bezel, glass and inner trim are removed the gauge is visible. To remove the gauge, the adjacent gauges need need be loosened. There are two tabs (visible in the picture) that are behind the adjacent gauges and will prevent you from removing the gauge.

When you reassemble Some of the reproduction gauges are made slightly thicker and the needle gets caught on the inner trim piece inhibiting the needles movement, making the gauge look like it’s not functioning. If you find this condition, a gentle push with your fingers will give you the additional clearance you need to keep it from binding. Mind you I do mean gentle as it moves easily and you don’t want to distort the inner trim piece. Once you have determined the needle moves freely, reassemble the rest of the cluster. The first time I installed the bezel, I used a screwdriver and a small hammer to crimp the bezel to the cluster and I felt it jared the cluster too much. The second time (yes, it took two times to get it right) I was able to use a needle nose pliers to get the crimps in. Protect the chrome from getting marred. Maybe some other “Bolters” have some other ideas on how to crimp the bezel on to the cluster. Now reinstall the cluster and hopefully it works!

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Last edited by Phak1; Fri Aug 05 2022 12:01 PM. Reason: Additional info

Phil
Moderator, The Engine Shop & Interiors

1952 Chevrolet 3100
Project Journals
Stovebolt Gallery

‘59 235 w/hydraulic lifters
“Three on the Tree” & 4:11 torque tube
12v w/ Alternator
Joined: Mar 2014
Posts: 2,998
J
'Bolter
I just use needle nosed pliers. Many years ago I actually had a pair of pliers which were made for stuff like this. They resembled hog ring pliers a little bit, but I haven't seen them for at least 20 years. One jaw was straight and one was curved and they worked like a champ. You don't need much, though with this trim ring. Oh, and if you get a replacement trim ring it will be chrome plated (not polished stainless) and the chrome plating will pop off when you crimp it. Good luck.


Jon

1952 1/2 ton with 1959 235
T5 with 3.07 rear end

Moderated by  ndkid275, Phak1 

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