The Stovebolt.com Forums Home | FAQ | Gallery | Tech Tips | Events | Features | Search
Getting back to business
First round of holidays is about over. A few weeks before the next ones. For some of us...

Winter is Coming
Time to think about wintering your Bolt.
(continued)

A good Tech Tip
WINTERIZING YOUR TRUCK
including a link back to the Forums for some new thoughts.

Searching the Site

Get info about how to search the entire Stovebolt site here. To do a search for just the forums, get those details in the IT Shortbus fourm.
Old Truck Calendars
In the works
Nothing like an old truck calendar

2023 Stovebolt Calendars

Check for details!


Who's Online Now
9 members (Jethro in Va, Brando4905, jwcarguy, Gray_Ghost, JoeDude, 1pete1), 177 guests, and 3 robots.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Forum Statistics
Forums60
Topics127,670
Posts1,046,519
Members46,401
Most Online1,229
Jan 21st, 2020
Step-by-step instructions for pictures in the forums
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
#1459994 Sun Jul 24 2022 04:09 AM
Joined: Mar 2010
Posts: 290
L
'Bolter
Hopefully I can get the pic to post
Do I need a diode for these tiny lights I plan to use for blinker indicators on the dash on my 52 Chevy truck it has a 12 volt system and no other led lights

Attached Images

This is no longer fun
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 6,264
Housekeeping (Moderator) Making a Stovebolt Bed & Paint and Body Shop Forums
If you mean a resistor, I don't think so, as long as the flasher works correctly. If you were to put all LED's in, then you may need a resistor somewhere in the circuit. BTW, an LED is a Light Emitting Diode.


Kevin
Newest Project - 51 Chevy 3100 work truck. Photos [flickr.com]
#2 - '29 Ford pickup restored from the ground up.
First car '29 Ford Special Coupe
Busting rust since the mid-60's
Joined: Mar 2010
Posts: 290
L
'Bolter
Thanks for replying wasn’t sure if had to add or change some


This is no longer fun
Joined: Mar 2014
Posts: 3,147
J
'Bolter
There are LEDs made especially to use with 12v and they will have a tiny resistor either built in the LED or in the wiring. An LED will have a + wire and a - wire. If you ground the - wire and touch the + wire to 12v + for just a bit you can tell. If it glows very brightly (too brightly) it isn't a 12v LED and if kept connected will burn out rapidly. If it is a 12v LED, it will glow at a nice even level. I used leds in the GPS and the programmable (pulse output) electronic speedometers I made for the AD. I used green for the directional indicators and red for the hi-beam. Good luck!

Attached Images
IMG_9606.JPG (195.72 KB, 56 downloads)
IMG_8870.JPG (120.96 KB, 56 downloads)

Jon

1952 1/2 ton with 1959 235
T5 with 3.07 rear end
Joined: Mar 2014
Posts: 3,147
J
'Bolter
Afterthought...if you have regular LEDs (not made for 12v) you can determine the amount of resistance needed to operate them on 12v by connecting a variable resistor (also known as a potentiometer) with a value of 5K ohms between the LED lead (either + or -) and either ground or the positive 12v source. Usually 1K ohm resistor is good, but if you don't know how your LED was built, you can figure it out with the variable resistor. Simply start at 5K of resistance (all the way to the right or left, depending on which way you connected the variable resistor) and turn slowly until you reach the desired degree of "glow" you want. Use a handheld meter to measure the variable resistor and also to know which resistor value to use when you get your desired brightness. Standard LEDs are not expensive at all (often you can buy 300 for $10 or so) and come in many colors so you could use yellow, orange, red, green, blue, white, purple...lots to choose from here.


Jon

1952 1/2 ton with 1959 235
T5 with 3.07 rear end

Moderated by  Rusty Rod 

Link Copied to Clipboard
Home | FAQ | Gallery | Tech Tips | Events | Features | Search | Hoo-Ya Shop
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.5