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Phak1 #1452139 Thu May 19 2022 05:48 PM
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 5,647
Housekeeping (Moderator) Making a Stovebolt Bed & Paint and Body Shop Forums
Originally Posted by Phak1
Your progressing nicely! I like your rotisserie! 👍
Me too.
I think I've seen that concept before. wink


Kevin
Newest Project - 51 Chevy 3100 work truck. Photos [flickr.com]
#2 - '29 Ford pickup restored from the ground up.
First car '29 Ford Special Coupe
Busting rust since the mid-60's
Joined: Jun 2019
Posts: 151
B
'Bolter
With progress on my cab moving along, I decided I'd better get some of the interior things rehabbed and ready to be installed someday. I brought home my gauges and ordered a number of restoration parts from a local vendor. Now, my truck is a '51 and as such it had an 80 mph speedo in it. The truck came with another pair of gauges that were not in the best shape, but I took both speedos apart so I could pick the best pieces to use. As it turned out, the decal set I bought (which was advertised for 1947-1953 Chevy trucks) came with a 90 mph speedo decal. This situation seems to be an issue with the various vendors I look at. At any rate, I went ahead with what I had. I plan to rehab the pieces I have for the 80 mph speedo, too, once I get a proper decal for the face plate.

I had a lot of fun with the odometer. I don't wish that little project on anybody that doesn't have the patience of Job. The decal instructions say to apply them directly over the old painted numbers on the wheels. That would ensure the numbers all line up properly. In my case, one of the odometers had teeth missing from the gear on the end, and the other odometer's wheels were stuck on the shaft. Also, the old painted numbers were flaking off the wheels so I had to scrape them all clean before applying the new numbers.

Since I wanted to reset my odo to zero, I jumped in with both feet and took them both apart. I always wanted to know how they worked anyway. For the uninitiated, each wheel has a dimple on one side that indicates the "0" position. Between each wheel is a thin metal plate with a small gear. The teeth on those little gears are different on each side so getting them installed in the correct way is critical. The wheels are held on the center shaft with washer-shaped keepers that are pressed onto each end. Only remove one of them so that the wheels stay in the same position on the shaft. I removed the keeper on the right (gear) end as it is much closer to the end of the shaft. Getting that keeper back onto the shaft in such a way that it is not too tight or too loose is challenging to say the least.

The end result is less than perfect as the zeroes don't line up just right. This is due to my application of the decals (not getting them in exactly the same spot on each wheel) and not the wheels themselves. I'm going to live with it until something better comes along.

The steel body of the speedo was prepped inside and out for repaint. On the outside I used Dupli-Color #SS100 "Stainless Steel" to replicate the galvanized look. The inside was repainted with Krylon #2437 "Satin Almond" which I found in my wife's stash of spray paint. The pressed ring that fits between the gauge body and the glass was originally painted in Chevy's "Champagne" color (I think that's what it's called). My son found a reference to Rust-Oleum #7272830 "Dark Metallic Bronze" right here in the Stovebolt forum. I found it to be a wonderful match to the original color.

I used a new chrome bezel and found that the bronze painted inner ring would not fit inside it as it should. The inner ring's flange was too wide across about 45% of its circumference. A short time with a good file took care of the problem. Next, the replacement gaskets that I got are not the same shape as the originals. The originals were round in cross section so they sat down inside the bezel. The new gaskets are square in cross section so they sit proud in the bezel. With the glass and inner ring in place, you can't push the gauge body down far enough to seat it all together and crimp the bezel. My solution was to take a razor blade and shave one the outer corner of the gasket to a 45 degree angle so that it sat down inside the bezel.

The speedo is done and I'm most of the way through doing the other gauge now so more on that soon.

Attached Images
Gauges_001.jpg (70.26 KB, 83 downloads)
Speedo_002.jpg (90.61 KB, 83 downloads)
Speedo_003.jpg (86.66 KB, 83 downloads)
Speedo_005.jpg (128.88 KB, 83 downloads)
Speedo_004.jpg (98.56 KB, 83 downloads)
Last edited by Brian Wise; Sat Jun 04 2022 03:28 PM. Reason: spelling error

Brian

'51 Chevy 3604 Project
'28 Chevy LO basket case
'83 GMC Sierra 4x4
Joined: Jun 2019
Posts: 151
B
'Bolter
Here's a photo showing the two odometers all taken apart. You can see the thin metal divider plates with their little gears. The wheels have a full "ring gear" on one side, and a very short section of teeth between "9" and "0" on the other side. The little gears have "extended" teeth on one side that engage that short section of teeth on the wheel to advance the next wheel one place. It's a very clever design.

Attached Images
Speedo_001.jpg (128 KB, 83 downloads)

Brian

'51 Chevy 3604 Project
'28 Chevy LO basket case
'83 GMC Sierra 4x4
Joined: Jun 2019
Posts: 151
B
'Bolter
Today was a big day for the project. With my son's help I got the cab re-installed on the chassis. Prior to putting it on, we installed the cab-to-running board seals on both sides and I finished coating the bottom of the cab with truck bed liner. After removing the steering column and a few other items installed during last summer's test drive, the cab went on without any hitches. Now I need to shim it to the proper height. I'm very excited about getting the front end all put together soon!

Attached Images
Cab 06-12-2022_001c.jpg (359.11 KB, 69 downloads)

Brian

'51 Chevy 3604 Project
'28 Chevy LO basket case
'83 GMC Sierra 4x4
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 2,654
P
AD Addict
That is a big day and it’s starting to look like a truck again. I think the best part is your not going backwards repairing every part you touch but moving forward toward a completed project. Congrats! chug


Phil
Moderator, The Engine Shop & Interiors

1952 Chevrolet 3100
Project Journals
Stovebolt Gallery

‘59 235 w/hydraulic lifters
“Three on the Tree” & 4:11 torque tube
12v w/ Alternator
Joined: Jun 2019
Posts: 151
B
'Bolter
Last weekend my folks were visiting from out-of-state for my dad's birthday. He's been a big supporter of my truck project so I figured I needed to have the truck in a condition to give him a ride while he was here. My list of to-do's was fairly long.

Previously I had painted the interior of the cab. I then painted the upper cowl area where the hood lays. I figured this was as good a place as any to spray the urethane sample I had mixed to match the "Gloss Regal Blue" I used inside the cab. After letting it cure a number of days, and being satisfied with the result, I installed new rubber grommets in the firewall, and the reconditioned fuse holder and voltage regulator (just for looks, it's not in use). I needed to get some of my new wiring loom installed, too, but first I had to purchase a new rubber mat (with the jute backing) for the inner firewall and get that installed. The new mat had die-cut holes for the various penetrations, some of which didn't match up at all. In hind sight, I should not have punched out the holes before installing the mat. Instead, I should have test fit the mat and marked it with a pen through the holes in the firewall, then cut the mat myself. It is what it is at this point, so I moved on. The new wiring loom my dad purchased over a year ago went in along with a new brake light switch and headlight dimmer switch.

To finish up inside the cab, I installed the brake and clutch pedals, the accelerator pedal and its rod, the starter pedal, and the choke and throttle cables. I also installed a new speedometer cable and the speedo I rebuilt. Next went in the re-conditioned seat adjusters, the cleaned (but not yet painted) seat frame along with the original cushions, and finally the steering wheel.

Moving to the outside of the cab, I re-installed the steering box and column (removed when I installed the cab). Then came the radiator, the inner fenders and their support rods.

After installing a temporary temperature gauge that I zip tied to the passenger side A pillar, I filled the cooling system with water. I also installed a temporary oil pressure gauge in the tee fitting at the block. Lastly, I ran fuel hose back to a temporary gas tank mounted on a piece of plywood on the frame behind the cab.

After a brief hiccup involving the distributor timing (quickly rectified by my son) the motor fired right up and idled smoothly. My son and I took a quick spin around the shop area to make sure everything was ok then it was my dad's turn. It was incredibly rewarding to be able to drive him around in my truck!

The first two photos don't do show the blue paint properly. The third photo better represents the dark gloss blue that I had matched to one of my porcelain enamel "Union 76" signs from the 1950's. My son reconditioned the air cleaner (a swap meet purchase) and added the decal which he made from a scan of an advertisement on a 1950's Union Oil road map.

I haven't had any luck uploading video files to this forum, so I plan to upload some video to my YouTube account then post a link.

Attached Images
07-18-2022c.jpg (71.06 KB, 37 downloads)
07-19-2022_001c.jpg (78.22 KB, 38 downloads)
IMG_5376c.jpg (276.83 KB, 38 downloads)
IMG_5391c.jpg (82.62 KB, 38 downloads)
Last edited by Brian Wise; Sun Jul 31 2022 05:12 PM. Reason: added info

Brian

'51 Chevy 3604 Project
'28 Chevy LO basket case
'83 GMC Sierra 4x4
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 2,654
P
AD Addict
Congrats on your first drive. Won’t be long before you take your first spin on the road!


Phil
Moderator, The Engine Shop & Interiors

1952 Chevrolet 3100
Project Journals
Stovebolt Gallery

‘59 235 w/hydraulic lifters
“Three on the Tree” & 4:11 torque tube
12v w/ Alternator
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