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Joined: Mar 2005
Posts: 1,467
C
'Bolter
I won’t comment on quality as that is more a personal choice but indicator style is worth considering when purchasing.
The indicator on the left is what Fox owns and is the most common general purpose style sold (2” dial face with 1” plunger travel)
The one on the right is referred to a dial TEST indicator. It is similar in cost to the first style but has far more versatility in that it can get inside pilot or dowel holes and the arm can be manipulated to see the dial face much more easily. This one has a range of .040” and I would bet in the 10 years Fox has owned his neither he nor his buddies had an application where more than .040” of dial travel was required. $117 on Amazon:

https://www.amazon.com/Mitutoyo-513-518T-Pocket-Indicator-0-20-0/dp/B0006J3YAI

more info:

https://www.practicalmachinist.com/inspection-and-measurement/top-dial-test-indicators/

https://www.practicalmachinist.com/...cting-a-magnetic-indicator-base-and-arm/

https://www.practicalmachinist.com/tips-and-tricks/choosing-the-right-dial-indicator/

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1952 1300 Canadian 1/2 ton restomod

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Joined: Nov 2004
Posts: 2,438
J
Workshop Owner
FYI: Very seldom do I ever use a travel style indicator. Only when I need more range (travel). Most often I prefer to use a test indicator. Interapid make the best test indicators (just my opinion) and mostly are all we use. I do have Starrett, Brown & Sharpe, Mitutoyo and Federal brands as well as a couple cheap imports in my toolbox at work. These I have accumulated over 40 years in the Tool & Die trade. They all work well. It's mostly a matter of personal preference.

For working on our old trucks, I wouldn't be afraid to use a cheap import (test or travel style) as long as it repeated well.

John


J Lucas



1941 Chevy 1/2-Ton
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Joined: Feb 2004
Posts: 25,002
H
Kettle Custodian (pot stirrer)
Try degreeing a camshaft with a .500"+ lift at the valve with a last word dial indicator. I'm debating between buying an indicator with a 2" stroke VS a 3" to use setting up the offset on my crankshaft grinder. Some of the cranks I work with have over a 4" stroke length, which requires offsetting the rotating heads more than 2 inches to get the rod journals to spin true. There's about a $75.00 difference in the cost of the dial indicators.
Jerry


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Joined: Nov 2004
Posts: 2,438
J
Workshop Owner
Originally Posted by Hotrod Lincoln
Try degreeing a camshaft with a .500"+ lift at the valve with a last word dial indicator. I'm debating between buying an indicator with a 2" stroke VS a 3" to use setting up the offset on my crankshaft grinder. Some of the cranks I work with have over a 4" stroke length, which requires offsetting the rotating heads more than 2 inches to get the rod journals to spin true. There's about a $75.00 difference in the cost of the dial indicators.
Jerry

Yep, personal preference of brand and length of required travel for what you're needs are. That's why and how I accumulated so many over the years.

John


J Lucas



1941 Chevy 1/2-Ton
1942 Chevy 1.5-Ton SWB
1959 Chevy Apache 31 Fleetside
1959 Chevy Apache 32 Fleetside
1969 Chevy C-50 Grain Truck

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Joined: Mar 2005
Posts: 1,467
C
'Bolter
Originally Posted by 2-Ton
My career depended on the quality of the precision tools I used and no one touched those tools but me.
Don

I can't count the number of times I've watched a journeyman machinist with complete confidence in both his measuring skills and his tools get shredded by a quality control department over non conforming parts due to his improperly calibrated tools or misuse of them. This is the very reason both API and ISO compliance now requires that ALL measuring tools in a shop are included in a quality management/calibration system. When a guy's tool comes back from calibration with a red tag what does he do? Sell it on Ebay and buy a quality replacement.

Fox,

My apologies for using you as an example. Let me offer to loan you any precision measuring tool you could possibly need for the cost of a drive to Acheson (and maybe a beer).

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2
Drafted Moderator!
Thanks Curt for the offer, but I also don't borrow any precision tools unless they are the company's tools and I can check them myself.
Been retired over 8 years now and don't need most of them any more.
Sold a bunch to Grigg a few years back, but kept the smaller stuff in case I want to help out in a local small shop. Or rebuilding an engine.

Really nice set you have there! An don't worry, use my name anytime.

Don


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F
Fox Offline
A teacher, but always an apprentice.
No worries, Curt. By no means am I an expert. I hope my tools are reading true! 😬 For what I’m doing I think it suffices. Oh, boy...is that doubt gnawing now? Bahaha!

That set you shared is beauty.


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1951 GMC 9430 1 ton dually—-Shiny!

1970 Chevrolet C10 - Grandpa’s- My first truck.—in progress to shiny
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1950 Chevrolet 1300- in progress to shiny.
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Joined: Jun 2010
Posts: 295
B
'Bolter
For the once in a blue moon I use my dial indicator I just went with Harbor Freight. Works fine for the light occasional use.


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1975 W-25 Hurst Olds
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