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Rear shock angle 1950 chev truck with 56 differential
#1435925 Mon Jan 03 2022 11:54 PM
Joined: Aug 2019
Posts: 103
R
'Bolter
I am wondering what appropriate angle should my rear shocks be at. I am using the rear axle conversion kit to install 1956 different on my 1950 truck . I am putting the leafs below the axle to keep stock height, I have not secured top shock mount yet but looks like if I put close to stock it would be 62 degrees. I read on previous forums 45 would be probably the best?

Attached Files
6FD597E1-EB12-4700-9A23-9FC265988B46.jpeg (273.37 KB, 137 downloads)
Re: Rear shock angle 1950 chev truck with 56 differential
Rick Brown #1435929 Tue Jan 04 2022 12:22 AM
Joined: Mar 2007
Posts: 1,616
T
Crusty Old Sarge
Rick, do a search for shock mount angle. I asked the a similar question early last year and it led to several responses. The stock mounting angle should work well, shocks are only there to dampen the spring rebound.


Craig

Come, Bleed or Blister something has got to give!!!
59' Apache 31, 327 V8 (0.030 over), Muncie M20 4 Speed, GM 10 Bolt Rear... long term project (30 years and counting)
Re: Rear shock angle 1950 chev truck with 56 differential
Rick Brown #1435930 Tue Jan 04 2022 12:42 AM
Joined: Mar 2010
Posts: 1,107
B
Curmudgeon
Yes it was a hot debate. Feathers were ruffled. I think the final statement was:

The shock at 45 degrees, the travel is less and the dampening is less.
The shock at 90 degrees, the travel is more and the dampening is more.

As long as the shock doesn't bottom-out or extend past it's maximum limit.


"Adding CFM to a truck will only help at engine speeds you don't want to use."
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Re: Rear shock angle 1950 chev truck with 56 differential
Rick Brown #1435980 Tue Jan 04 2022 05:17 AM
Joined: Aug 2019
Posts: 103
R
'Bolter
Well then maybe 67.5 is the way to go

Re: Rear shock angle 1950 chev truck with 56 differential
Rick Brown #1436014 Tue Jan 04 2022 05:00 PM
Joined: Feb 2004
Posts: 24,297
H
Kettle Custodian (pot stirrer)
Some people don't understand geometry. Somewhere between 45 and 60 degrees gives the longest shock travel, which equates to more dampening, not less. Be aware that the angle is constantly changing as the rear end moves through its range of motion.
Jerry


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Re: Rear shock angle 1950 chev truck with 56 differential
Rick Brown #1436103 Wed Jan 05 2022 01:40 AM
Joined: Mar 2014
Posts: 2,777
J
'Bolter
After owning/driving AD trucks for 50+ years I'll add the rear axle when coupled with the stock leaf spring scheme (what it appears you have) in normal driving does not move up/down nearly as much or as freely as you might think. Very stiff, actually.

Now a 1965 pickup I owned for a summer was a completely different thing. In ways it rode more like a car. The rear moved up/down much more easily within the first 2 inches of spring travel. Driving through curves, you could actually feel and see it wallow in the rear. If two guys stood in the back and jumped up and down, the rear would bounce easily. When you hit the brakes, the front would stay pretty well level, but the back would elevate on you, giving an odd feeling of loss of control at any speed over 50. But if you loaded the bed (say with firewood), once it compressed past about 2 inches, you got into the "meat" of those rear coils and then it actually rode like a truck.


Jon

1952 1/2 ton with 1959 235
T5 with 3.07 rear end
Re: Rear shock angle 1950 chev truck with 56 differential
Rick Brown #1436158 Wed Jan 05 2022 03:30 PM
Joined: Feb 2000
Posts: 4,445
J
'Bolter
Buoymaker, you were right the first time, the farther away from 90*, the less effective the the shock is. This is a chart more then one of the aftermarket suspension companies use.

Attached Files
Shocks angle effeciency.jpg (121.53 KB, 67 downloads)
Last edited by Joe H; Wed Jan 05 2022 03:35 PM.
Re: Rear shock angle 1950 chev truck with 56 differential
Rick Brown #1436188 Wed Jan 05 2022 07:36 PM
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 5,349
Housekeeping (Moderator) Making a Stovebolt Bed & Paint and Body Shop Forums
That figure isn't correct. For the same amount of suspension travel (vertically), a vertically mounted shock travels exactly the same amount. If that same shock is mounted at 45 degrees, the shock compresses ~1.4 times farther than the vertically mounted one. And 1.4 times faster. Since shocks work on a compression velocity principle the shock mounted at 45 degrees will have more resistance.
45 degrees is the sweet spot, and the compression distance decreases if mounted closer to horizontal. In the extreme, if a shock is mounted horizontally, it will have zero compression as the suspension compresses.


Kevin
Newest Project - 51 Chevy 3100 work truck. Photos [flickr.com]
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Re: Rear shock angle 1950 chev truck with 56 differential
Rick Brown #1436211 Wed Jan 05 2022 10:57 PM
Joined: Mar 2007
Posts: 162
A
'Bolter
I think the key is the word efficiency in the graph - and I'd posit another alternate, effectiveness. A shock cannot be designed and engineered at an angle other than vertical (it could but, since all shock mounting situations are different what angle would they pick) Most OEMs and shock manufacturers thus assuming the shock was designed to be most effective at vertical and so everyone works around those assumptions. However this rational only exists in my mind to justify the above graph and understanding - shocks are best installed as close to vertical as possible.

Plus there are other factors to the shocks performance besides it cycling velocity. As it moves farther from vertical it takes less force to compress it.

The angle, velocity, travel amount, force and spring rate are all variables a particular shock has to contend with in addition to similar size shocks (length and diameter) with different valving characteristics. You could mount a shock at 45 degrees and have it perform acceptably as long as it is sized and valved accordingly.

Note the suspension travel vs. shock travel in the chart. If the suspension compresses x amount but the shock only compress a portion of that, then only a portion of the potential amount of fluid is flowing through the valving to dampen the motion (regardless of the velocity with which it does it).

In this specific instance, the amount of travel is already determined by the springs and bump stops. You would want to mount the shock at a "reasonable" angle so that the shock is essentially nearly fully extended when at full droop and nearly completely compressed when on the bump stops. I would recommend somewhere close to factory, unless you want to do a bunch of trial and error with different mounting angles, shock sizes and valve characteristics.

Last edited by asilverblazer; Wed Jan 05 2022 11:07 PM.
Re: Rear shock angle 1950 chev truck with 56 differential
Rick Brown #1436249 Thu Jan 06 2022 03:26 AM
Joined: Jul 2000
Posts: 1,458
G
Insomniac
Use the KISS principle. When I bought my Camaro rear axle, I grabbed the shock mounts along with other parts. The shock mounts have the angle set. I just followed that angle when I set up the shocks. IOW, the angle is the same as the factory Camaro. You have to trust the GM engineers. This does mean that I have 1 shock leaning forward and 1 shock leaning backward.


Gord
----
1954 1/2 ton 235 4 speed
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