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#1434072 Sun Dec 19 2021 02:01 PM
Joined: Nov 2021
Posts: 199
W
'Bolter
I recently purchased a 1949 3600 and there are some areas of the cab that definitely need repair (see photos attached).

I am aware of patch panels for the rear lower corners but not sure what I need for the floor near the firewall and front lower corners. The cab mounts appear to be okay but sometime in its previous life it appears the cab mount hardware (and maybe more) has been removed. It is not clear what is actually retaining the cab at this time other than it weight.

I was anticipating removing the cab to allow complete cleaning and painting of the frame but I don't have a rotisserie or other means to manipulate the cab so I am having second thoughts.

At this point I am developing my project plan and would appreciate any insight that members could provide.

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1949/50 3600 Project
WICruiser #1434117 Sun Dec 19 2021 09:23 PM
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 5,451
Housekeeping (Moderator) Making a Stovebolt Bed & Paint and Body Shop Forums
There are patch panels available for everything you need to do.
Floor panels from the front of the seat riser up to the toe board are available right and left side. You may not need the complete panels, but there will be the material you need there.
Inner, outer, and the infamous inner-to-outer cowl panels are also available, either short height or full height. You'll be swearing at the inner-to-outer cowl panel as you try to fit it in place. Just cut it where needed and weld it back together.

Your cab seems to be solid enough that you may not need a rotisserie. Some guys have laid the cab on it's back on appropriate padding to work on the floor. Be sure that you put temporary bracing in place before cutting out too much rusty metal so the cab doesn't get distorted. There are checking dimensions in the Factory Assembly Manual that can help you keep it correct.

You'll know more once you get it cleaned up.

Be sure to ask if you have more questions. I've been thru that effort (and more) and pics are in my signature link.


Kevin
Newest Project - 51 Chevy 3100 work truck. Photos [flickr.com]
#2 - '29 Ford pickup restored from the ground up.
First car '29 Ford Special Coupe
Busting rust since the mid-60's
WICruiser #1434179 Mon Dec 20 2021 01:05 PM
Joined: Nov 2021
Posts: 199
W
'Bolter
Kevin,

Thanks for the information and pointing me to your great photo gallery, definitely a lot of time and effort to not only do what you did but to document it all with pictures.


1949/50 3600 Project
WICruiser #1434203 Mon Dec 20 2021 04:15 PM
Joined: Apr 2007
Posts: 936
L
'Bolter
Having done two off frame restorations (my '50 COE and '37) I would recommend removing the cab. You will discover some things that you will want to fix early enough in the process to make it easier. A totally stripped cab only weighs about 370 lbs, so you and 3 of your friends can easily lift it off; or use straps and an engine cherry picker. Get a decent wooden pallet and buy some cheap swivel caster wheels at a big box store and make yourself a cab dolly. The cab can also be rolled on its back with some padding to work on the underside. Follow Kevin's advice and you will be fine.
Kent


1937 Chevy 1/2 ton
1942 Chevy 1/2 ton
1947 Diamond T Model 509
1951 Chevy 1/2 ton
1950 Chevy COE Model 5700 ~ "Barney" ~ And more pix
WICruiser #1434206 Mon Dec 20 2021 04:45 PM
Joined: Nov 2021
Posts: 199
W
'Bolter
Thanks Kent
I am was envisioning leaving the doors installed to help secure the cab shape during the removal and handling process but I suspect they will be in the way for a lot of work so that may not be a good plan.


1949/50 3600 Project
WICruiser #1434246 Tue Dec 21 2021 12:50 AM
Joined: Mar 2010
Posts: 10,103
5
'Bolter
The best platform upon which to make the repairs I see on your cab would be your frame.
The first thing you need to do is re-establish the front and rear cab mounts and measure and set the gaps, as per The Manual, between the cab and the frame at all four corners. This will give you a stable platform to keep everything from moving around as you cut and replace each of your rusty panels one at a time.

WICruiser #1434286 Tue Dec 21 2021 02:27 PM
Joined: Nov 2021
Posts: 199
W
'Bolter
Thanks Carl, that makes a lot of sense. I have not reviewed the rear cab mounts but it seems clear that the front mounts were removed at some point.

The good news is that the frame appears to be solid in all the visible areas so hopefully also solid under cab.


1949/50 3600 Project
WICruiser #1434312 Tue Dec 21 2021 06:45 PM
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 5,451
Housekeeping (Moderator) Making a Stovebolt Bed & Paint and Body Shop Forums
I'd agree with Carl except for a few things.
1. The rear cab mounts are flexible, so it would be possible to get things off.
2. I hate working on my back, especially welding overhead.
3. The frame will be in the way of some places you need to get at.

My preference (and what I've done) is to remove the cab. It wasn't assembled on the frame at the factory.


Kevin
Newest Project - 51 Chevy 3100 work truck. Photos [flickr.com]
#2 - '29 Ford pickup restored from the ground up.
First car '29 Ford Special Coupe
Busting rust since the mid-60's
klhansen #1434314 Tue Dec 21 2021 07:14 PM
Joined: Mar 2010
Posts: 10,103
5
'Bolter
Originally Posted by klhansen
I'd agree with Carl except for a few things.
1. The rear cab mounts are flexible, so it would be possible to get things off.
2. I hate working on my back, especially welding overhead.
3. The frame will be in the way of some places you need to get at.

My preference (and what I've done) is to remove the cab. It wasn't assembled on the frame at the factory.
1) The rear mounts are pretty much stationary if the front mounts are tight. I never notice my cab rolling around when I climb in my daily driver. Those rear mounts are designed merely so that the cab does not get crushed when the frame flexes, such as when driven off road.
2 &3) I hate working on my back also. Once I make all of the rust repairs from inside of the cab, the cab becomes a very rigid unit, giving me the confidence that nothing will get torqued out of shape once I remove it from the frame and stand it on the firewall so that I can easily get to the underside of the floor and the cab corners.

WICruiser #1434318 Tue Dec 21 2021 07:49 PM
Joined: May 2005
Posts: 8,800
B
Sir Searchalot
Agree with Carl to leave on the frame. I also don't see "welding on your back" a problem in this case. Welding thick stiff with stringer and weave is not fun, but this kind of welding is stacked spots. So it's just Zap welding one at a time. The issues associated with upside down welding don't exist. Removing the cab seems just an option if you have the wherewithal.
Removing the cab is not so simple, lots of things to remove and it's real heavy. Plus it's nice a shady under there.

WIcruiser: Do your top side patching, then decide on how to do the under later. A whole lot can be done with out laying on your back or removal. After trying on your back or side, you will know if it's OK or not. Be sure to jack the truck up so you can sit in a chair for the initial top side welding/fitting/measuring. I have four of those old 50's office chairs as my creepers.


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