The Stovebolt.com Forums Home | FAQ | Forum | Swap Meet | Gallery | Tech Tips | Events | Features | Search | Hoo-Ya Shop
Positive thinking ...
We are still asking:
What did you
get done on
your Bolt today
????


The question, initially posted May 23, 2005, was:
"Whatcha do on your Bolt
this weekend?"

After 51,906,997 views, 7378 replies over 185 pages, this thread in General Truck Talk is a happening! And it's not just weekends anymore.


Now with pictures
and No BOTS.


So ...


What did you get done on your Bolt today????


Stovebolt Site Search
'
Oh Lord, I just gotta find it....

A pdf guide to help you search the Site


Old Truck Calendars
Months of truck photos!
Nothing like an old truck calendar

Stovebolt Calendars

Check for details!


Who's Online Now
7 members (Goach2, Rsqwhite, Lightholder's Dad, ndkid275, Harold46, DavidBraley), 106 guests, and 3 robots.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Forum Statistics
Forums60
Topics127,470
Posts1,031,723
Members45,787
Most Online1,229
Jan 21st, 2020
Image Posting Policy
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Help ID my radio
#1433237 Sun Dec 12 2021 01:53 AM
Joined: Jul 2021
Posts: 6
C
ckhd Offline OP
'Bolter
My daughter bought a '48 Chevy, and not knowing that much about them, I assumed this was an original radio. However, I can't find any pictures of ones like it, so I think it's from something else. Do you recognize it?

Attached Files
20210713_084942.jpg (226.94 KB, 78 downloads)
Re: Help ID my radio
ckhd #1433244 Sun Dec 12 2021 03:10 AM
Joined: Mar 2010
Posts: 1,066
B
Curmudgeon
In 1948, the Chevrolet truck radio was expensive. Trucks were used for work so not many radios were purchased.
That's one reason why original truck radios today bring a 10X higher price.
Certain year Buick and Pontiac radios will fit in the Chevrolet truck dash (1947-53) opening quite nicely.
Back in the day a truck owner could wait a few years and eventually pick up a used car radio, in the wreck yard, a lot cheaper.
I think what you have is a "period or era" correct part for your truck. A part of history.

It is a Delco "Master" model 984170 used on 1946, 1947, 1948 Pontiacs
Not to be confused with the "Deluxe" model which had pushbuttons.
The original model number may be found underneath the radio cover.
I could not find another picture of the faceplate.

Info:
https://www.radiomuseum.org/r/united_1_984170_pontiac.html
Photofact:
https://www.ebay.com/itm/363338655380

This will be an expensive radio to repair.


"Adding CFM to a truck will only help at engine speeds you don't want to use."
"I found there was nothing to gain beyond 400 CFM."
Re: Help ID my radio
buoymaker #1433269 Sun Dec 12 2021 01:16 PM
Joined: Jul 2021
Posts: 6
C
ckhd Offline OP
'Bolter
Thank you for the information. I probably wouldn't have ever found it myself! Is the fancy bezel from the Pontiac as well?

Re: Help ID my radio
ckhd #1433319 Sun Dec 12 2021 08:31 PM
Joined: Mar 2010
Posts: 1,066
B
Curmudgeon
The faceplate covers the gaps between dash and the tuner face as well as the volume and bass/treble controls.
Without the faceplate, it would not be pretty to look at but it would be functional.
If I was going through the trouble to remove the radio assembly, I would definitely take the faceplate as well.

Something else. Automobile production stopped (WW2) in 1942 then resumed in 1946.
No one had time to retool for new models so the 1946 models (sometimes 47 & 48) were basically the same as 1942.
Your radio could be a 1941 or 1942 model as well.
If you want to know more, I would find a 40's Pontiac forum or Pontiac section of forums.aaca.org.

FYI, the 1948 6400 cab and hood will fit a 1947-53 1/2 ton frame quite nicely but the fenders, inner-fenders and grille are just too big.
At one time black fenders and running boards were standard (all cab colors). Color was optional.
You have the option to do a 1/2 ton and make good use of the patina cab and buy 1/2 ton fenders and grille.
It's all a matter of taste, the size of your wallet and more importantly your daughter's approval of her gift to you.

Here in NC, there are several classic big trucks that make their way onto a modern diesel truck chassis.
The big fenders will work well with the big tires that the young guys run....in the mud. Yuck.
Again, it's a matter of taste.


"Adding CFM to a truck will only help at engine speeds you don't want to use."
"I found there was nothing to gain beyond 400 CFM."

Moderated by  truckernix 

Link Copied to Clipboard
Home | FAQ | Forum | Swap Meet | Gallery | Tech Tips | Events | Features | Search | Hoo-Ya Shop
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.4