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Positive thinking ...
We are still asking:
What did you
get done on
your Bolt today
????


The question, initially posted May 23, 2005, was:
"Whatcha do on your Bolt
this weekend?"

After 51,906,997 views, 7378 replies over 185 pages, this thread in General Truck Talk is a happening! And it's not just weekends anymore.


Now with pictures
and No BOTS.


So ...


What did you get done on your Bolt today????


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Re: What have you done on your (Big Bolt) today
NH46COE #1431490 Sat Nov 27 2021 01:16 AM
Joined: Oct 2018
Posts: 92
C
'Bolter
What a coincidence.... Actually, just finished up installing two new tires on a couple of those two-piece wheels (lock ring type - not RH-5) yesterday.

When inflating that type of wheel, I use a clip-on chuck, and a remote valve & gauge. I install the wheel to be inflated on the truck, with the ring facing inward - toward the inner wheel. Inflate in 10 psi increments, with a release to zero in between - just to make sure the tube settles in. Check for proper ring seating using an inspection mirror.

If the ring were to come off, it is trapped between the two wheels, but I still stand back 25 or 30 feet just in case. (Note: The tire being inflated in the attached pic is the one on the truck, NOT the one laying on the floor.)

Best Regards...

Attached Files
Tire Repl 05 Lo.jpg (47.2 KB, 256 downloads)
Tire Repl 08 Lo.jpg (69.96 KB, 257 downloads)
Tire Repl 09 Lo.jpg (48.58 KB, 252 downloads)
Re: What have you done on your (Big Bolt) today
NH46COE #1431494 Sat Nov 27 2021 01:29 AM
Joined: Mar 2007
Posts: 162
A
'Bolter
Rebuilt the horn relay and new horns. Inner rear wheel seal to keep the diff fluid out of the rear drum.

Re: What have you done on your (Big Bolt) today
NH46COE #1431840 Tue Nov 30 2021 05:47 PM
Joined: Sep 2021
Posts: 16
O
'Bolter
Crowbar and Fixite, I got those same wheels here. Is there any thing special I need to know about removing the solid rings from them or should I say any wrong way to do it? Dont want to damage the wheels Or myself?

Re: What have you done on your (Big Bolt) today
fixite7 #1431904 Wed Dec 01 2021 02:11 AM
Joined: Dec 2020
Posts: 16
N
NH46COE Offline OP
'Bolter
Thanks for the heads up. It was cut the day before it was milled and they did a really nice job so it is amazingly straight for rough cut. I’ve screwed it down to the cross members and just going to let it dry out over the winter & probably seal it in the spring. Then add some racks to it and see how it looks !

Re: What have you done on your (Big Bolt) today
CrowbarBob #1431906 Wed Dec 01 2021 02:31 AM
Joined: Dec 2020
Posts: 16
N
NH46COE Offline OP
'Bolter
Nice ! Really clean looking wheel..

Re: What have you done on your (Big Bolt) today
NH46COE #1432166 Fri Dec 03 2021 07:58 AM
Joined: Oct 2018
Posts: 92
C
'Bolter
Hi Oilyrider,

As long as the tire is deflated, it is pretty difficult to hurt oneself working on these wheels.

Once the air is out, lay the wheel flat on the ground and break the bead loose. I do this by stepping on it at various places around the rim. It usually will break free if the wheel is not too rusty. Sometimes, I have to pour tire lube or dishwashing soap around the perimeter of the rim, and let it soak in along the bead. If you keep working the tire, it will eventually unseat. Sometimes, a little prying with a tire iron is also needed.

Professional tire and wheel shops use a big hammer with almost a chisel end on it, to break the bead. I don't have one, and would probably not be confident enough in my aim even if I did. My rims and lock rings are full of dents & dings - presumably from someone who had used this method sometime in the past, but had definitely not mastered it.

Once the beads are broken loose, the lock ring is removed. There is a notch in the ring to engage either a tire iron, or a large screw driver. As you pry on the lock ring to push it away from the rim, the opposite side of the ring needs to go down and into the slot cut around the circumference of the rim. I use a good sized (approx 2 lb.) dead blow hammer for this, hitting the ring down and into the rim slot, as I simultaneously pry on the opposite side with a tire iron. The ring should tilt enough to get another screw driver between the lip of the lock ring and the rim. You can then work your way around the ring continuing to whack on it with the dead blow hammer. It will usually pop off when you get a quarter to a third of the way around. (Note: While the lock ring is fairly robust, too much pressure can bend it, so don't go crazy trying to pry it off.)

You will see that the lock ring has a retaining lip, that holds it on the rim. If you look closely at the first pic in the post above, you will notice that there are two cutouts in this lip, which assist in sliding the lock ring over the rim.

Once the ring is off, with the tire still lying flat on the ground, put a few of 4x4 pieces of wood under the tire, basically suspending the rim. Then, push or stand on the rim to work it out of the tire. The tire lube, or dish soap works well here too, in order to help get the tire to slide over the rim. The tire, tube, and flap all come off as an assembly.

All of my rims have been rusty inside, so their first stop is at the sandblaster whenever I pull a tire off for the first time. I also try to do a little cleanup on the more pitted areas with sandpaper. This is also a good time to inspect for cracks, or serious rust. Inspect the area where the rim connects to the center hub very closely. Fortunately, although some of my wheels and rings have shown some pitting, they are still serviceable. Note, it is also good practice to keep the lock ring with the wheel it came off of. Do not mix them. If all is well, prime and paint as desired.

After the paint cures, it's time for reassembly. First, the tube is slightly aired up, just until it starts to look round. It is coated with tire lube, and pushed into the tire. Next, the flap is lubed, and installed. I like to slide my hand into the tire/flap interface, all around both beads, to make sure the flap is centered, and sitting flat. You don't want any edges rolled up in between the tire and tube.

I put a little more air into the tube, just a shot or two, to ensure that it's captured in the tire, and won't shift around. Lay the rim on the ground with the lock ring side up. Tilt the rim up from the side opposite the valve stem slot. Then tilt the tire onto the rim starting with the valve stem side, tilting and pushing the valve stem thru the slot in the rim. If the tire bead is lubed, the rest of the tire should easily slide onto the rim.

To install the lock ring, push it onto the rim at the cutout areas. Using the dead blow hammer, start on the side opposite the notch, and try to tilt and tap the ring into the slot in the rim. It helps to stand on the rim, with your feet over the lock ring to keep it from popping off. Once the lock ring starts to engage the rim, you can usually work it back on by whacking it with the dead blow hammer. Sometimes, it needs a little help. In this case, I stick a piece of 2x2 into one of the hand holes and push down on the lock ring while hitting it with the dead blow hammer until it pops back on. I know "real" tire shops often use a big steel hammer for this, but I prefer the dead blow as it is less likely to knock off the fresh paint.

Lastly, follow the inflation procedure as described above. It is HIGHLY recommended to use a safety cage for this - especially if this is your first time, and may be unsure of proper lock ring seating. If not, the above procedure is pretty safe. I know others have used nylon straps, logging chains, or other heavy duty retention methods to contain the ring in the event it comes off during inflation.

Best Regards.....

Attached Files
Tire Repl 01 Lo.jpg (13.63 KB, 191 downloads)
Tire Repl 02 Lo.jpg (14.97 KB, 191 downloads)
Tire Repl 12 Lo.jpg (25.46 KB, 193 downloads)
Tire Repl 06 Lo.jpg (57.89 KB, 191 downloads)
Tire Repl 11 Lo.jpg (35.1 KB, 193 downloads)
Last edited by CrowbarBob; Fri Dec 03 2021 08:14 AM. Reason: Typo
Re: What have you done on your (Big Bolt) today
NH46COE #1432198 Fri Dec 03 2021 06:06 PM
Joined: Sep 2021
Posts: 16
O
'Bolter
Thanks Crowbar,that info is a great explanation of what I am needing to do here.I really appreciate all the help. Having never done any work on the big trucks I really enjoy all the detailed info. I much rather ask lots of questions than screw up things.

Re: What have you done on your (Big Bolt) today
NH46COE #1434667 Fri Dec 24 2021 10:10 PM
Joined: Feb 2016
Posts: 667
7
'Bolter
I have been slowly working on wheels and tires for my 5700. I removed three old tires by hand, had the wheels sandblasted, then I epoxy primed and painted them. I was still looking for 4 more tires for the drives and I found a shop that had just brought some in from a school fleet. So I bought 4 Firestone virgin 10R-22.5 steers that are in nice shape, had him mount and balance 2 of my Michelin 235/85/22.5 for my steers. He said he could have my other 4 wheels blasted and powder coated for $38 each so that was a no-brainer. Now waiting on three to come back BUT I was able to test drive now with 4 good tires, with the 10R-22.5's on the rear I gained 5 mph at governed speed, I cleaned and adjusted the governor and at 4000 RPM no load it runs at 3700-3800 RPM on the road at 51-52 mph. I only have $560 into 8 real nice tires, $545 into blasting, primer, paint, powder coat and a little for labor for mounting 7 wheels. I'm happy as a clam

Last edited by 78buckshot; Fri Dec 24 2021 10:11 PM.

1957 Chevrolet 5700 LCF 283 SM420 single speed rear, 1955 IH 300U T/A, 1978 Corvette 350 auto
Re: What have you done on your (Big Bolt) today
CrowbarBob #1434683 Sat Dec 25 2021 03:59 AM
Joined: Dec 2018
Posts: 1,444
F
'Bolter
Crowbar Bob You mentioned the safety cage,a tire shop guy hired a new young guy who seemed to understand split rims. He had him working on some and told him to use the cage,owner went to the bank. When he returned the new helper was in the cage reaching out to pump up one of the split rims !! I guess that will work--right ??

Re: What have you done on your (Big Bolt) today
asilverblazer #1434686 Sat Dec 25 2021 04:28 AM
Joined: Dec 2018
Posts: 1,444
F
'Bolter
asilverblazer You better give that booster a chance,both of them,thay like a dose {2 oz.) of hydraulic jack oil to lube a big leather cup in there. The big truck service book tells how to do this,my two are 71 yrs. old work good !! Always big fun to climb on the brakes and know you can stop !! they worry about disc brakes all the time, my 51 6400 made into a 98 inch wheelbase pickup has plenty of brakes. It is pretty happy at 50 MPH on good roads has 8.25x 20 with 4 and 2 speed axle.

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