The Stovebolt.com Forums Home | FAQ | Forum | Swap Meet | Gallery | Tech Tips | Events | Features | Search | Hoo-Ya Shop
Thinking again ...
We are still asking:
What did you
get done on
your Bolt today
????


The question, initially posted May 23, 2005, was:
"Whatcha do on your Bolt
this weekend?"

After 51,906,997 views, 7378 replies over 185 pages, this thread in General Truck Talk is a happening! And it's not just weekends anymore.


Now with pictures
and No BOTS.


So ...


What did you get done on your Bolt today????


Stovebolt Site Search
'
Oh Lord, I just gotta find it....

A pdf guide to help you search the Site


Old Truck Calendars
Months of truck photos!
Nothing like an old truck calendar

Stovebolt Calendars

Check for details!


Who's Online Now
7 members (53 green 1- ton, Bill Trotter, Ricster, Bill Marlow, joe apple, 1 invisible), 66 guests, and 3 robots.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Forum Statistics
Forums60
Topics127,583
Posts1,032,707
Members45,812
Most Online1,229
Jan 21st, 2020
Image Posting Policy
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Air filters/dryers
#1426594 Tue Oct 12 2021 04:13 AM
Joined: Nov 2005
Posts: 1,422
H
homer52 Offline OP
'Bolter
I am coming closer to getting my paintbooth ready for painting and was wanting advice on what to use for filter/drying of my compressed air. I was thinking of plumbing my shop air over to the booth where I would have a filter/dryer. I was thinking of punching through the wall and putting a quick disconnect on the inside then using a very flexible whip for easy maneuvering inside the booth. I guess the question is how much is enough? I also saw there is a small filter/dryer that could be put just ahead of the spray gun. Should I use one or both? All advice is appreciated!

By the way yesterday I picked up my car from the blaster which was also green primed, some acid wash prep. It looks beautiful, can't wait to get after it. Dave


Pictures [s300.photobucket.com]
41 Chevy
41 GMC resting peacefully
46/7 Chevy
45 GMC panel truck in line for restoration
41 Plymouth in the restoration process
41 Chevy coe in line for restoration
Re: Air filters/dryers
homer52 #1426596 Tue Oct 12 2021 05:02 AM
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 5,349
Housekeeping (Moderator) Making a Stovebolt Bed & Paint and Body Shop Forums
I use a small in-line throwaway filter just in front of my gun. That's all I have other than a filter separator right at the compressor discharge. I haven't gotten to finish paint yet, so haven't worried about having perfectly dry air. I may add air dryer capacity when I get to finsh paint.
A friend built an air dryer using fintube like what is used on baseboard heating. He ran about 20 feet of the stuff in-line right after the compressor with a drain trap at the bottom of the rack. The idea behind that is to cool the air as much as possible, then drain the water out. The colder the air gets, the more water can be wrung out of it. Another important thing is to have the piping sloped to points where moisture it can be drained.


Kevin
Newest Project - 51 Chevy 3100 work truck. Photos [flickr.com]
#2 - '29 Ford pickup restored from the ground up.
First car '29 Ford Special Coupe
Busting rust since the mid-60's
Re: Air filters/dryers
homer52 #1426607 Tue Oct 12 2021 12:44 PM
Joined: Sep 2010
Posts: 1,789
W
back yard wrench turner
I made a water seperator for my shop. The theory is making the air bend helps remove the moisture. Dead end traps with valves gives a place for the moisture to accumulate and then get drained out of the system.
This setup has the inlet at the bottom and works it's way to the top. The final loop has a trap and a drain then goes high before coming down to the air filters.

Attached Files
water seperator.jpg (53.52 KB, 130 downloads)
Last edited by Wayne67vert; Tue Oct 12 2021 12:46 PM.

Wayne

When I die, I hope she doesn't sell everything for what I told her I paid for it!

1938 1-Ton Farm Truck
-30-Stovebolt Gallery
Re: Air filters/dryers
homer52 #1426660 Tue Oct 12 2021 06:15 PM
Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 3,522
"Hey! I sound like Darth Vader!!
I have a trap at the compressor, then 30' past, a long coil of hose with a drain on the last loop. Cools at those loops. Then I run about 75' of hose to the other side of my house where I have my "booth" tent. At that point, one more trap, then my dry hose that I spray with. On my gun(s), I have a fisheye filter, sometimes. Haven't had water contamination issues for some time now.

Re: Air filters/dryers
homer52 #1426664 Tue Oct 12 2021 07:10 PM
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 5,349
Housekeeping (Moderator) Making a Stovebolt Bed & Paint and Body Shop Forums
My friend's setup is similar to Wayne's, except his has vertical runs. If the runs were made out of fintube it would cool the air quicker.

Also, sloping the horizontal runs in the direction of airflow would help direct the condensed water to the traps, so compressor connected at the top would be a bit more efficient. Then the takeoff for the hose would be above the final water trap. An auto drain trap for the water at the bottom of your drip leg would be the icing on the cake, so you wouldn't have to remember to drain the drip leg.

Here's a pic of my friend's setup.

Attached Files
Air Dryer.jpg (239.98 KB, 113 downloads)

Kevin
Newest Project - 51 Chevy 3100 work truck. Photos [flickr.com]
#2 - '29 Ford pickup restored from the ground up.
First car '29 Ford Special Coupe
Busting rust since the mid-60's
Re: Air filters/dryers
homer52 #1428841 Tue Nov 02 2021 12:06 AM
Joined: Nov 2014
Posts: 82
C
'Bolter
I made one of these. look up "The Copper Coil Air Dryer/Compressor Aftercooler DIY " on Youtube. It worked well, you fill it with ice. - painted my truck in the September Florida humidity with no issues. I did have a the desiccant snake after it just in case and 30 ft of hose before it.

Attached Files
coil air dryer.JPG (26.48 KB, 76 downloads)

1953 3100
Re: Air filters/dryers
homer52 #1429308 Fri Nov 05 2021 06:26 PM
Joined: Oct 2007
Posts: 46
J
'Bolter
Clever solutions! I live in Oregon where it rains occasionally so I also had trouble with water in my air lines, especially when painting. I discovered that when the compressed air leaves the gun nozzle that it expands and gets colder resulting in condensation. My solution was to fill about 3' of schedule 40 PVC pipe with reusable desiccant that I can remove by removing the pipe caps on the PVC. The desiccant can then be rejuvenated by placing on a cookie sheet in an oven at 175 degrees F for approximately 30 minutes. I also use a HF "final filter" at the gun just in case.

Attached Files
Silica Gel.jpg (117.89 KB, 53 downloads)
Air Dryer.jpg (122 KB, 53 downloads)

Finally '54
Re: Air filters/dryers
homer52 #1429314 Fri Nov 05 2021 06:56 PM
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 5,349
Housekeeping (Moderator) Making a Stovebolt Bed & Paint and Body Shop Forums
Good idea.

Being lazy, I'd probably build something like that with the air line coming in from the side down low, and out the side up high with screw caps on top and bottom. Then Just unscrew the caps to replace the dessicant without having to disturb the piping. If you built it out of clear tubing, you could tell when the dessicant needed to be changed, also. I don't know if clear tubing is rated for compressed air though. Most recommendations are to avoid any type of plastic pipe for compressed air, although there are some that are specifically rated for it. There's a danger of rupture, and with all that stored energy that could be dangerous.


Kevin
Newest Project - 51 Chevy 3100 work truck. Photos [flickr.com]
#2 - '29 Ford pickup restored from the ground up.
First car '29 Ford Special Coupe
Busting rust since the mid-60's
Re: Air filters/dryers
homer52 #1429324 Fri Nov 05 2021 07:21 PM
Joined: Oct 2007
Posts: 46
J
'Bolter
I've also read that PVC should not be used for compressed air so I chose to put it after the regulator to limit any potential damage. This also allows the air to expand and cool lowering its temperature and making the desiccant work better. You could also place the dryer behind the tank or some other large object to minimize potential damage or place it in a section of 4" stove pipe. I have the regulator set to 60PSI (my compressor tops out at 125 PSI) and I use another regulator at the gun. As you suggested, the air enters the bottom of the dryer and exits out the top. I also installed small screens at the input and output to keep the desiccant out of the air lines.


Finally '54

Moderated by  HandyAndy, klhansen 

Link Copied to Clipboard
Home | FAQ | Forum | Swap Meet | Gallery | Tech Tips | Events | Features | Search | Hoo-Ya Shop
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.4