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Stock front seat relocation.
#1413287 Wed Jun 09 2021 12:23 PM
Joined: Mar 2021
Posts: 19
N
'Bolter
So I have my stock front seat mocked up to see how everything will fit, and I must say it is really close to the steering wheel.

I am 5'9" tall and would really like to move my seat back to make it more comfortable to drive.

I know I can just drill another set of holes but can anyone post pics, tips or tricks on relocating their stock front suburban seat.... Thanx!

Attached Files
A439B9F5-E758-49AE-98A3-1693919A9AF9.jpeg (116.92 KB, 199 downloads)
Last edited by NorCal52Suburban; Wed Jun 09 2021 11:48 PM.
Re: Stock front seat relocation.
NorCal52Suburban #1417384 Mon Jul 19 2021 07:38 AM
Joined: Dec 2014
Posts: 815
M
'Bolter
I used nutserts (aka rivnuts) to relocate the mounting holes.


1951 Chevy Panel Truck
Re: Stock front seat relocation.
MiraclePieCo #1417387 Mon Jul 19 2021 11:53 AM
Joined: Mar 2021
Posts: 19
N
'Bolter
Originally Posted by MiraclePieCo
I used nutserts (aka rivnuts) to relocate the mounting holes.

Thank you, never even thought about "Nutserts"

Re: Stock front seat relocation.
NorCal52Suburban #1417410 Mon Jul 19 2021 05:42 PM
Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 3,300
"Hey! I sound like Darth Vader!!
Hopefully with some reinforcement? Asking a nutsert to hold a seat in plain ol' sheet metal is asking a lot.

Re: Stock front seat relocation.
MNSmith #1419928 Mon Aug 09 2021 03:11 AM
Joined: Dec 2014
Posts: 815
M
'Bolter
Originally Posted by MNSmith
Hopefully with some reinforcement? Asking a nutsert to hold a seat in plain ol' sheet metal is asking a lot.

Not sure how to respond to that slightly veiled challenge to my engineering abilities, other than to say that although the nutserts have been holding perfectly for three years now, if they ever fail I'll make sure you're the first to know.


1951 Chevy Panel Truck
Re: Stock front seat relocation.
NorCal52Suburban #1419981 Mon Aug 09 2021 05:55 PM
Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 3,300
"Hey! I sound like Darth Vader!!
Not a challenge at all. They are designed for a specific purpose. Light duty fastening. I don't believe holding a seat to the floor would be considered light duty. I've seen plenty used in the wrong application and seen them fail. And the friction from bolt to nutsert corrosion will 99% of the time overcome the compression friction applied when installing these things. No matter if the "light duty" nutsert version or the serrated "heavy duty" version. But I'm not here to tell you how to build your truck. Just sharing my experience.

Re: Stock front seat relocation.
MNSmith #1420237 Wed Aug 11 2021 09:20 AM
Joined: Dec 2014
Posts: 815
M
'Bolter
Light duty? TCI uses nutserts for body mounts on their high-performance aftermarket chassis. They've been holding my Model A body on its TCI frame for over 20 years now.


1951 Chevy Panel Truck
Re: Stock front seat relocation.
NorCal52Suburban #1420281 Wed Aug 11 2021 06:34 PM
Joined: Jan 2019
Posts: 93
F
'Bolter
Nutserts into a 5/16" thick structural member are a completely different animal than ones going into sheetmetal.

If you look at the test strength from Rivnut (in my experience the best nutserts), the sheetmetal tests are done on a panel that is supported on both sides 1/2" from the centerline of the hole. It is not until they get to 0.125" plate that they test the strength against just the mounting surface.

A fully compressed nutsert will have a loading surface that is an annular ring that is a percentage of the diameter of the bolt. It usually ends up being slightly smaller than a standard diameter washer (as opposed to a fender washer). I have not seen your specific setup, so I cannot comment on its structural stability.

As a generic recommendation to someone looking to move a mount, I would say to look at how the stock mount is supported and at least duplicate that. On my truck, the underside of cab where the seat bolts go in is a much thicker section of metal around the bolt. This could be replicated in another location by putting in a backing plate. The purpose of the backing plate is to spread the load out across a larger surface area. The strength of the metal is correctly measured in lb/in2, so increasing the area where the load is applied will reduce the likelihood of structural failure under load.

Last edited by Fibonachu; Wed Aug 11 2021 06:45 PM. Reason: to add more detail on backing plates

58 Apache, long bed fleetside, V8 w/SM420
Drivable but the rear axle needs work.

59 Apache, long bed fleetside, half of an L6, 3 on the tree
Bought by my dad out of a field for $100 to build with my brother. He never touched it, so now it is mine if I can figure out how to get it down from Alaska.
Re: Stock front seat relocation.
NorCal52Suburban #1420327 Thu Aug 12 2021 02:22 AM
Joined: Dec 2002
Posts: 4,208
Moderator - The Electrical Bay and Rocky Mountain Bolters
Lets not let this conversation get too cheeky. The real test of whether or not a nutsert will hold or fail is a hard collision that I hope never happens to anyone. I use a 3/16 steel strap and 2" washers when I relocate seat mounts on sheetmetal.


Another quality post.


Real Trucks Rattle

HELP! The Paranoids are after me!
Re: Stock front seat relocation.
Rusty Rod #1420341 Thu Aug 12 2021 04:15 AM
Joined: Dec 2014
Posts: 815
M
'Bolter
Originally Posted by Rusty Rod
I use a 3/16 steel strap and 2" washers when I relocate seat mounts on sheetmetal.

That won't work for panel truck seats; depending on where you locate the seat, due to baffles inside the pedestal the inside is inaccessible with one's hands to install nuts/washers. I know because I tried it first before I resorted to nutserts.

A wreck would not pull my seat mounts out because my seatbelts are mounted to the floor behind the seat, not the seat itself. And simple math will tell you that the cumulative strength of eight 3/16" nutserts is greater than two 1/2" seat belt bolts.

Originally Posted by Fibonachu
Nutserts into a 5/16" thick structural member are a completely different animal than ones going into sheetmetal.

The original bolts are in sheet metal.

TCI Model A frames are only 1/8" wall, nowhere near 5/16. TCI was originally criticized for using nutserts too, but time has proven them secure.

This is another case of guys warning against something they have never actually done themselves. I've done it, it's worked flawlessly for three years with two-up in the seat and a bunch of horsepower shoving us against the back. Yeah, were both lightweights; maybe those with heavy loads might not want to try it ;-)


1951 Chevy Panel Truck
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Moderated by  MNSmith, Rusty Rod 

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