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Positive thinking ...
We are still asking:
What did you
get done on
your Bolt today
????


The question, initially posted May 23, 2005, was:
"Whatcha do on your Bolt
this weekend?"

After 51,906,997 views, 7378 replies over 185 pages, this thread in General Truck Talk is a happening! And it's not just weekends anymore.


Now with pictures
and No BOTS.


So ...


What did you get done on your Bolt today????


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Re: Restoring the basketcase
Gray_Ghost #1430920 Sun Nov 21 2021 10:53 PM
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 5,313
Housekeeping (Moderator) Making a Stovebolt Bed & Paint and Body Shop Forums
Know that the plug welds will compromise the JB Weld in the vicinity of the welds. Epoxy will loose it's strength at 300 degrees F or so. If you can live with that, then proceed.


Kevin
Newest Project - 51 Chevy 3100 work truck. Photos [flickr.com]
#2 - '29 Ford pickup restored from the ground up.
First car '29 Ford Special Coupe
Busting rust since the mid-60's
Re: Restoring the basketcase
Gray_Ghost #1430931 Sun Nov 21 2021 11:54 PM
Joined: Sep 2010
Posts: 261
G
'Bolter
Hey Kevin,

I am concerned about the heat of welding damaging the epoxy bond. The JB Weld package claims that the product, once fully cured, can withstand 550 degrees. To try to avoid damaging the bond, I tried to make the area covered in weld through primer a little larger than the weld itself would require, to create a buffer between the weld and epoxy. The other thing that I'm planning on doing is to do the plug welds one dot at a time. I'm hopeful that by going that slow, I don't heat the surrounding metal to too high a temp. Having a cold garage may help dissipate heat a little quicker, too. All combined, I hope that it holds sufficiently. If I screw it up...I guess I'll have to try a different approach. Can you think of any other techniques that I could try to help avoid compromising the epoxy? Thanks for the heads up!


Mike

1953 3100
1994 Chevy 1500 (Donated to charity 2016)
2002 Chevy S10 ZR2

My Restoration Adventure Blog [grayghost53.blogspot.com]
Re: Restoring the basketcase
Gray_Ghost #1430934 Mon Nov 22 2021 12:17 AM
Joined: Sep 2010
Posts: 1,786
W
back yard wrench turner
I have found these items to help me when I weld flat panels together.
Keep your air gun close, and use it to cool each weld as soon as you weld it.
Move around, stay as far away from the last weld as possible.
Go slow, If the metal is too hot to touch, it's too hot to weld.


Wayne

When I die, I hope she doesn't sell everything for what I told her I paid for it!

1938 1-Ton Farm Truck
-30-Stovebolt Gallery
Re: Restoring the basketcase
Wayne67vert #1430935 Mon Nov 22 2021 12:24 AM
Joined: Sep 2010
Posts: 261
G
'Bolter
Wayne,

Thanks! Great tips!


Mike

1953 3100
1994 Chevy 1500 (Donated to charity 2016)
2002 Chevy S10 ZR2

My Restoration Adventure Blog [grayghost53.blogspot.com]
Re: Restoring the basketcase
Gray_Ghost #1430953 Mon Nov 22 2021 07:03 AM
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 5,313
Housekeeping (Moderator) Making a Stovebolt Bed & Paint and Body Shop Forums
If you have some putty, some of that stuck around each of the plug welds before welding. That would act as a heat sink to keep the weld heat from going too far afield. I think there's specific putty for that use, not something that is oil based, which might ignite.


Kevin
Newest Project - 51 Chevy 3100 work truck. Photos [flickr.com]
#2 - '29 Ford pickup restored from the ground up.
First car '29 Ford Special Coupe
Busting rust since the mid-60's
Re: Restoring the basketcase
Gray_Ghost #1430964 Mon Nov 22 2021 12:48 PM
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 2,384
P
AD Addict
Although presently out of stock, Eastwood carries it so you know what you are looking for. https://www.eastwood.com/ew-anti-heat-compound-1-qt.html

I would think any autobody supply would carry similar products.

Last edited by Phak1; Tue Nov 23 2021 01:13 AM.

Phil

1952 Chevrolet 3100
Project Journals
Stovebolt Gallery

‘59 235 w/hydraulic lifters
“Three on the Tree” & 4:11 torque tube
12v w/ Alternator
Re: Restoring the basketcase
Gray_Ghost #1430982 Mon Nov 22 2021 03:44 PM
Joined: Sep 2010
Posts: 261
G
'Bolter
I've never heard of the anti heat compound before. That stuff looks like it would be very handy!


Mike

1953 3100
1994 Chevy 1500 (Donated to charity 2016)
2002 Chevy S10 ZR2

My Restoration Adventure Blog [grayghost53.blogspot.com]
Re: Restoring the basketcase
Gray_Ghost #1433546 Tue Dec 14 2021 07:30 PM
Joined: Sep 2010
Posts: 261
G
'Bolter
Hi Everyone,

It's been a couple of weeks since my last update. During that time I've been hard at it, welding up a storm. It's been an interesting experience. The weather turned colder here and the garage temps dropped below 50 degrees. That definitely had an impact on the penetration of my welds. To deal with the issue I did a couple of things. First, I moved a small space heater into the cab of the truck to warm the metal up. It's not hot, but certainly warmer than 50 degrees. Additionally, I increased the power setting from "low" to "high" and increased the wire feed slightly. All combined, I think the problem was solved.

As you may recall, I decided to use epoxy to bond the remnants of the original floor pan to the new pan and keep the replacement part whole. I had a few fit issues when I went to bond the two panels together. I'm not sure what went wrong. My only guess is the space that the epoxy took up, but that's only a guess. The fitment issues were not bad enough to cause major problems, just more of an inconvenience for me to work around. In the first pic, you can see that I've been welding the seam between the new panel and the old panels, making a series of weld dots, until it is almost a complete weld across the entire seam. Additionally, I've been removing the sheet metal screws, drilling out the top panel to simulate a drilled out spot weld and making a plug weld, while filling the sheet metal screw hole. I'm not 100% done, yet, but over the hump. It's been a ton of work. The other day, I decided to climb into the cab and test my work by placing my body weight onto the new floor. I sat on the seat riser and there was one pop from a weld breaking. I was quickly able to figure out which dot broke and fixed it. Definitely not a lengthy test, but it made me feel better about my welds. The good welds produce a sharp tone when lightly struck with my slag hammer. The bad welds produce a dull thud. The dull thuds get redone until a sharp, crisp tone is produced. The sound and how the penetration looks on the back side are my factors in accepting the weld dots or redoing them.

In the second pic you can see the outside of the inner cowl (being test fit) and the inner to outer cowl piece being test fit. What a poorly made piece the inner to outer cowl piece is! To deal with the poorly shaped piece, I'm thinking that I will cut out two pie shaped sections in the sides. One will be near the top where the arc begins and the second will be further down with the exact location tbd. The thought is that I'll be able to correct the bend in the back piece to match the arc on the outer cowl. Once the arc is correct, I'll make patches to fit in the pie shapes that I cut out. Kinda hard to describe and it will be easier when pics are attached. However, before I go there, I need to fix the hinge reinforcement part while I have access from both inside and outside of the cab. Then I'll address the bottom of the hinge pillar. Then onto final fitment of the inner cowl piece. Then the inner to outer cowl piece. Oy!

A ton of work still to go, but a ton behind me. Definite progress being made, but I grossly over estimated the speed at which I would be able to work. Meh, that's life. Onwards and upwards! As always, comments and suggestions are welcome.

Attached Files
20211214_115125.jpg (368.99 KB, 108 downloads)
20211214_114955.jpg (385.17 KB, 107 downloads)

Mike

1953 3100
1994 Chevy 1500 (Donated to charity 2016)
2002 Chevy S10 ZR2

My Restoration Adventure Blog [grayghost53.blogspot.com]
Re: Restoring the basketcase
Gray_Ghost #1433549 Tue Dec 14 2021 07:47 PM
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 5,313
Housekeeping (Moderator) Making a Stovebolt Bed & Paint and Body Shop Forums
Looks like you're making good progress.
Welcome to the world of ill fitting replacement panels. That cowl panel has to be one of the worst, just behind the inner-to-outer cowl piece. Sometimes pie cuts are the only way to get them to fit.


Kevin
Newest Project - 51 Chevy 3100 work truck. Photos [flickr.com]
#2 - '29 Ford pickup restored from the ground up.
First car '29 Ford Special Coupe
Busting rust since the mid-60's
Re: Restoring the basketcase
Gray_Ghost #1438935 Wed Jan 26 2022 08:56 PM
Joined: Sep 2010
Posts: 261
G
'Bolter
Hey Everyone,

Been quite a while since my last update. Truthfully, I've had a hard time getting into the garage lately. Basically since right before Christmas, through the snowstorm and subsequent downed tree cleanup until today, lots of other things that needed to be done. In between, I did get some time in the garage. In the last update, I showed a pic with the floor almost completed. In the interim time, I did get the passenger side floor done. I intentionally left the very center incomplete with the thought that I'd do the center of both sides at the same time. So, with the floor done and a coat of primer and paint down to keep things from rusting, I moved on to a task that most don't have to deal with. Specifically, the lower hinge reinforcement. Earlier posts detailed my thoughts on how to build a new reinforcement. After really digging into it, I decided to keep what I already had and reinforce the reinforcement. What does that mean? I added a second layer around the first...a doubler. What was wrong with the original reinforcer? The top weld nuts were incomplete. The bottom of both nuts were rusted away. The bottom weld nut was still there, but barely attached, with almost all of the reinforcement in that area gone. Pics of the weld nuts are attached. When I cut off the remnants of the weld nuts, it struck me that I could double up on the reinforcement while I was replacing the bottom portion that the weld nut is attached to. A bit unconventional, I understand, but its on the back side of the reinforcement, so it won't get in the way of the hinge (I tested it and the pic is attached). The cross portion that is welded to the sides of the hinge pillar were mostly intact, with one side rusted away. I'll add doublers to that, once I get the new hinge pillar piece installed. All during this effort, I was learning my new HF welder.... Yes, I broke down and bought the new version that they sell, that corrects the major deficiencies of my old one. Mainly, it changes from AC/electrode positive to DC/electrode negative. I really had my doubts that it would make much of a difference, but boy was I wrong! Night and day different. There's good and bad in that, though. Yes my welds will be better and I think that I'll have fewer welds to redo, but there is still a learning curve associated with the new equipment. What better place to practice and learn than in an area that no one will ever see, unless they unearth this journal! Anyway, I'm now satisfied with the reinforcement work and have added a quick coat of paint to protect the bare steel. I did a bare minimum of grinding on the welds, since they will be hidden away. Now, it's time for me to focus on the bottom of the hinge pillar. To be honest, I've had a really difficult time focusing on the reinforcement repair work. Not sure why, maybe its the cold, who knows. I'm hopeful that I can get my motivation back and knock this part out quickly. Sadly, I've still got a mess on my property that needs cleaning and that will have to be dealt with. The last thing I need is my HOA giving me grief! Enjoy the pics. As always, comments and suggestions are welcome.

PS, While lacking motivation to work on the current project, I took the time to do an off-topic task that I'll need in the not too distant future. I've always hated the way that the heater switches look like an afterthought. In fact, my truck didn't have a rotary switch, it had a simple toggle switch that was wired with old extension cord! Anyway, to prepare for when the cab welding is done, I knew I needed something for my heater switch. I also want to add a momentary switch for the intended electric fuel pump. The thought here is that the momentary switch will be used to prime the carb bowl before cranking the engine. I also plan to have an oil pressure switch that will work the fuel pump when the engine is running. So, I rooted around and found a good solution. It is a small panel that came from a 1940s F**d. I took out the old heater switch, cleaned off the rust and painted it to match the dashboard. I added both the momentary switch and the new rotary heater switch that everyone sells. I think it looks pretty good! The holes in the original panel exactly match up to factory holes on the underside of the dash, to the left of the steering column. It's like it was meant to be! Several years ago, I did a restoration of the original heater. It's been sitting in my basement waiting for me to get the cab work done. Hopefully it doesn't have to wait much longer. Let me know if you want to see a pic/writeup on the heater. It turned out pretty nice, if I do say so....

Attached Files
20211217_085032.jpg (254.38 KB, 74 downloads)
20220126_083636.jpg (905.52 KB, 73 downloads)
20220124_111351.jpg (271.99 KB, 74 downloads)
20220126_094516.jpg (206.01 KB, 71 downloads)
20211231_083343.jpg (365.92 KB, 72 downloads)

Mike

1953 3100
1994 Chevy 1500 (Donated to charity 2016)
2002 Chevy S10 ZR2

My Restoration Adventure Blog [grayghost53.blogspot.com]
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