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Joined: Nov 1995
Posts: 5,429
J
Unrepentant VW Lover
I found the overflow tank Buoymaker shows in his post at a swapmeet table at the Winchester show a few years ago. NOS and still in its original box with the instructions. They are out there.

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John
Cisgendered heteronormative aggressor perpetrating problematic toxic ideas of Chevrolet normativity smile

'49 Chevrolet 3804




Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 3,847
B
'Bolter

Joined: Nov 2011
Posts: 2,712
P
'Bolter
Here is what I made for my 1941 truck. Bottle is 1930's vintage.

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Joined: Jul 2000
Posts: 61
R
'Bolter
I used an antique fire extinguisher as the overflow tank for my 1928 AB Canopy Express (Justin). I cut up an old electric motor mount to use as the overflow tank's brackets.

The inlet tube is clamped to the radiator overflow tube and goes into the tank from the bottom. There is also an overflow tube for the overflow tank ;-) that comes out the back side and is around 1 1/2 inches from the top. That tube is open to the ground, but has never 'puked'. Even driving at high elevation (7900 feet) in 98 degree heat.

What's not in the pic is the sheet metal heat shield that I put over the exhaust pipe so the radiant heat would not affect the overflow tank. That was added later based on a hunch, not clear evidence that it was needed.

See the attached pic.

Cheers, Dean

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Dean 'Rustoholic' Meltz

Lurch: 1927 1-Ton Chevy Cattle Truck
In the Stovebolt Gallery [stovebolt.com]
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More fun with Lurch [stovebolt.com]

Justin: 1928 Chevrolet AB Canopy Express
In the Stovebolt Gallery [stovebolt.com]
Joined: Jun 2011
Posts: 4,498
E
'Bolter
Dodge makes handy tank that mounts vertically, uses tapered mounts that are easy to copy. Comes on Some Cummins Dodges, Dakota, probably others.

Ed

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'37 GMC T-18 w/ DD 4-53T, RTO-610, 6231 aux., '95 GMC running gear, full disc brakes, power steering, 22.5 wheels and tires.
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Joined: Mar 2010
Posts: 1,224
B
Curmudgeon
A "puke" bottle can be made out of most anything. You still have to periodically check coolant levels and refill as needed. You fill the radiator with enough coolant to cover the core plus a little bit more. As the coolant heats up and expands it fills the tank. If you add too much, it comes out the overflow pipe while you are driving.

The original coolant overflow option has a tank (picture) where the coolant is pulled back into the radiator, after the engine is shut off and the radiator cools down. A gasket was added between the radiator neck and the original cap to keep the system from leaking vacuum. This is similar to what is used on today's cars and trucks except the coolant system is pressurized and the radiator cap has two valves.

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"Adding CFM to a truck will only help at engine speeds you don't want to use."
"I found there was nothing to gain beyond 400 CFM."
Joined: Jan 2014
Posts: 2,080
J
JW51 Online OP
'Bolter
For the coolant to siphon back to the radiator, must the container have a vent of some sort?

Joined: Mar 2010
Posts: 1,224
B
Curmudgeon
The vent is the tank connection that says System Overflow in the diagram.
The original tank may say "outlet".
The instruction says connect the 20 inch small diameter hose to the outlet/overflow.
The other end of the hose simply hangs down with no connection (open to atmosphere).


"Adding CFM to a truck will only help at engine speeds you don't want to use."
"I found there was nothing to gain beyond 400 CFM."
Joined: Jan 2014
Posts: 2,080
J
JW51 Online OP
'Bolter
Originally Posted by buoymaker
The vent is the tank connection that says System Overflow in the diagram.
The original tank may say "outlet".
The instruction says connect the 20 inch small diameter hose to the outlet/overflow.
The other end of the hose simply hangs down with no connection (open to atmosphere).

Yep...got it.

Just trying to understand the physics of I’m engineering my own tank.

Joined: Aug 2017
Posts: 618
S
'Bolter
I made my holder out of extra truck seat pieces.
Used a new but old type of original oil glass bottle.
Todd

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