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#1415309 Tue Jun 29 2021 04:41 PM
Joined: Jan 2014
Posts: 2,080
J
JW51 Online OP
'Bolter
This is an item on the “when I get around to it” list that I probably need to “get around to.” Never added a proper drain tube or puke tank to my replacement radiator. I now see some evidence that the radiator has, in fact, puked.

Thinking I will do something that looks like a “period” owner modification. An antique milk bottle, large soda bottle, etc.

Curious what various trucks here are running , and some of the mounting and routing detail.

The nipple of the neck of my radiator just has a little flared ridge. I guess for just clamping a rubber hose onto. I’m OK at sweating copper pipe for household plumbing. Can I affix some copper line via solder to the overflow nipple on the radiator? It’s a copper brass radiator.

Joined: Mar 2014
Posts: 2,901
J
'Bolter
Sure...you could do that. Just be careful not to get things too hot. You don't want to upset any of the other solder joints there. Period correct? Hmm, let's think a bit. Ideally you'll need something that can have an outlet at the bottom, so a can might be best (unless you're good at drilling holes in glass). 1951...coffee came in cans, tobacco did also, Dr. Pepper came in cone top cans with a common soda bottle cap and some beer did also (Blatz Old Heidelberg I think), Or pancake syrup. Some pancake syrup came in old cans like that. Good luck!


Jon

1952 1/2 ton with 1959 235
T5 with 3.07 rear end
Joined: Jan 2014
Posts: 2,080
J
JW51 Online OP
'Bolter
Good point. I might skip the soldering exercise.

I might be a bit confused on the plumbing. I was just thinking a single line in the top of whatever container I choose. What is it that you are describing?

Joined: Jul 2000
Posts: 1,503
G
Insomniac
Slip a rubber hose with a clamp on to the overflow nipple and you are good to go. Not a lot of pressure to worry about.


Gord
----
1954 1/2 ton 235 4 speed
Joined: Aug 2018
Posts: 373
D
'Bolter
JW, I think Jon is recommending the bottom hole in the container, so that as the engine/cooling system cools, the excess fluid will be pulled back into the radiator. You may accomplish the same thing from the top, if the hose goes all the way to the bottom of the container, as a dip tube. Add a second hole in the top to act as a vent (or leave unsealed. Jon will correct me if I'm off target.

Doug

Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 3,847
B
'Bolter

Joined: Mar 2010
Posts: 1,224
B
Curmudgeon
Mine was missing. I topped off the coolant below the overflow hole. Covered the area with a damp towel.
Just like a water piper, solder and heat. I used the wrong black paint but it's not a show truck.

You probably know this but there is an original overflow recovery option but parts are hard to find.

Attached Images
Rad Overflow 01.jpg (74.81 KB, 189 downloads)
Rad Overflow 02.jpg (110.13 KB, 195 downloads)
Rad Overflow 03.jpg (86.87 KB, 185 downloads)

"Adding CFM to a truck will only help at engine speeds you don't want to use."
"I found there was nothing to gain beyond 400 CFM."
Joined: Sep 2010
Posts: 1,802
W
back yard wrench turner
I use a mason jar for my overflow.

My radiator is a non pressure and I don't think it has ever pushed any antifreeze into the overflow.


Wayne

When I die, I hope she doesn't sell everything for what I told her I paid for it!

1938 1-Ton Farm Truck
-30-Stovebolt Gallery
Joined: Mar 2014
Posts: 2,901
J
'Bolter
You're on target, Doug. I've seen the two hose in the top types, but I prefer the one with the bottom connection. I have one I bought from J.C. Whitney around 1980. I figured it would last about a year and it is still going strong. Sort of a milky white plastic bottle and a holder frame that connects to the back side of the radiator support. If these are set up right, you never have to mess with your coolant until you think you want to change it or something. I've seen some really elaborate ones with cooling fins and such, but I figure if GM, Toyota, Subaru, Honda, etc use the milky white plastic bottles that's fine with me and probably all I need. They sell the same exact one I got on Amazon. Here it is:

https://tinyurl.com/xwcma5we


Jon

1952 1/2 ton with 1959 235
T5 with 3.07 rear end
Joined: Jul 2000
Posts: 1,503
G
Insomniac
Some of us have used stainless recovery tanks as mentioned in this thread.
https://www.stovebolt.com/ubbthread...ator-questions-what-are-these-holes.html


Gord
----
1954 1/2 ton 235 4 speed
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