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Things from the internet I can’t unsee (oil filtration)
#1410638 Thu May 20 2021 04:18 PM
Joined: Jan 2014
Posts: 1,623
J
JW51 Offline OP
'Bolter
(Mods can move this as they see fit...it’s oil related but not gonna hurt my feelings if it doesn’t belong in the engine forum)

So I had a random thought the other day. “I wonder what it would take to convert my old messy cartridge bypass filter into a modern spin on bypass system.” I knew you could buy a simple bypass spin on adapter, the rest is surely simple enough.

Searching for any oil related topic is likely to lead you to the “bobistheoilguy” forums and it’s not the first time I’ve been there but.....

Holy cow. You wanna see a nerdy vehicle related sub-culture that’s nerdiness level 11 compared to the nerdy (I mean that in a good way) discussions we have here?

There are some guys (or gals for all i know) that treat the subject of bypass filtration as a near religion: Ex. This filter sucks because it has a nominal micron rating of ___ but a 95% efficiency rating of _____. Guys doing really in depth analysis of their oil lab results on very scheduled intervals. And on. And on.

Sounds like a lot of modern spin on “bypass” filters aren’t much, if any, more efficient than their full flow brethren. They just happen to have a small orifice so they can function as a bypass.

I got sucked in too deep for a while. Almost created an account over there. But I think I’m gonna let it lie and not chase THAT rabbit down THAT hole.

Re: Things from the internet I can’t unsee (oil filtration)
JW51 #1410653 Thu May 20 2021 05:53 PM
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 4,183
Housekeeping (Moderator) Making a Stovebolt Bed & Paint and Body Shop Forums
I'll join in on the "nerdiness". grin Yeah, those BITOG forum guys really get down in the weeds.

A bypass filter can filter tiny particles out of the oil, but they only filter PART of the oil. As long as there's enough oil pressure to push the oil thru the filter, it could remove down to single digit micron size particles.
A full flow filter on the other hand, has to have larger passages because ALL of the oil has to go thru it and have enough pressure left so there's still some oil flow to lubricate the engine. If you put a small micron size filter element in a full flow housing, you'd starve the engine for oil as the filter plugs.

What you're considering is entirely do-able. And there are lots of filter elements to chose from. Smaller micron size elements would filter out more stuff, but are limited by what percentage of the oil goes thru it, and would plug sooner. I'd pick a reasonable micron size element (maybe in the 10-20 range as a WAG) for reasonably good particle removal and life.


Kevin
First car '29 Ford Special Coupe
#2 - '29 Ford pickup restored from the ground up.
Newest Project - 51 Chevy 3100 work truck. Photos [flickr.com]
Busting rust since the mid-60's
Re: Things from the internet I can’t unsee (oil filtration)
JW51 #1410664 Thu May 20 2021 07:30 PM
Joined: Feb 2004
Posts: 23,004
H
'Bolter
For a good compromise between micron size, flow rate, and availability at the local FLAPS, try filtering oil with a spin-on Diesel fuel filter for a Cummins or Detroit big rig engine. The micron rating is much finer than any engine oil filter I know of, and the filter media isn't going to care what kind of fluid it's straining the crud out of. You'll still need a pressure control orfice. I've got a few dozen Holley carburetor jets from my round track racing days that do the job nicely.
Jerry


The murder victim was drowned in a bathtub full of Rice Krispies and milk.
The coroner blamed the crime on a cereal killer!

Cringe and wail in fear, Eloi- - - - -we Morlocks are on the hunt!
Re: Things from the internet I can’t unsee (oil filtration)
JW51 #1410667 Thu May 20 2021 07:46 PM
Joined: Sep 2009
Posts: 356
G
'Bolter
I don't understand this "only filters part of the oil" thing.

I think a better way to say it is "it filters a small portion of the oil very slowly".

Am I correct? There's no possible way to say that it only filters part of the oil in the engine. Eventually, all of the oil will get cycled through the filter, just not at the same speed or repetition as newer cars with higher pressure oil pumps.

Last edited by Green_98; Thu May 20 2021 07:48 PM.

-Patrick
1953 Chevrolet 3100
261 / 4-speed / 4:11 / Commercial Red

Re: Things from the internet I can’t unsee (oil filtration)
Green_98 #1410710 Fri May 21 2021 01:52 AM
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 4,183
Housekeeping (Moderator) Making a Stovebolt Bed & Paint and Body Shop Forums
Originally Posted by Green_98
I don't understand this "only filters part of the oil" thing.

I think a better way to say it is "it filters a small portion of the oil very slowly".

Am I correct? There's no possible way to say that it only filters part of the oil in the engine. Eventually, all of the oil will get cycled through the filter, just not at the same speed or repetition as newer cars with higher pressure oil pumps.
You are correct. But in a given time interval, it only filters part of the oil. Given enough time, (a LOOOOOOONG time), all of the oil will pass thru the filter.
Say that 10% of the pump flow goes thru the bypass, that part will mix back with the oil in the pan, so it will be 10% cleaner. Then that oil goes thru again, and it will be 10% of 90% cleaner. If you do the math it'll never get 100% filtered, but close enough for horseshoes or hand grenades. grin


Kevin
First car '29 Ford Special Coupe
#2 - '29 Ford pickup restored from the ground up.
Newest Project - 51 Chevy 3100 work truck. Photos [flickr.com]
Busting rust since the mid-60's
Re: Things from the internet I can’t unsee (oil filtration)
JW51 #1410711 Fri May 21 2021 02:04 AM
Joined: Feb 2004
Posts: 23,004
H
'Bolter
The ideal filtering situation would be like older Cummins big rig engines used, with two filters- - - -one full flow to strain out the big chunks that might damage rod and main bearings and other soft metal parts like wrist pin bushings, etc., and a bypass filter with very fine mesh to trap the small debris that the full flow can't catch. Back when Carter used to sell a fuel filter with a porous ceramic element, they claimed the brass mesh inlet screen that some carburetors used was for "rocks, marbles, and bowling balls"- - - - -the same might be said for a full flow oil filter!
Jerry


The murder victim was drowned in a bathtub full of Rice Krispies and milk.
The coroner blamed the crime on a cereal killer!

Cringe and wail in fear, Eloi- - - - -we Morlocks are on the hunt!
Re: Things from the internet I can’t unsee (oil filtration)
JW51 #1410771 Fri May 21 2021 03:53 PM
Joined: Sep 2009
Posts: 356
G
'Bolter
Interesting, thanks for the input. I have the bypass flow on my 261, and I change the the oil every 500-1,000 miles or so. It's mostly a garage queen and the odometer doesn't work, so I basically just change it two or three times per year.


-Patrick
1953 Chevrolet 3100
261 / 4-speed / 4:11 / Commercial Red

Re: Things from the internet I can’t unsee (oil filtration)
JW51 #1410908 Sat May 22 2021 03:04 PM
Joined: Jan 2020
Posts: 695
D
'Bolter
Yup, I got it, I think maybe.....uh no but, what! Still change every 1000 to 1200 miles with the basket filter, does that sound right? Doc.


Currently making 1954 3100 better than new and Genetics
Re: Things from the internet I can’t unsee (oil filtration)
JW51 #1410911 Sat May 22 2021 03:30 PM
Joined: Feb 2004
Posts: 23,004
H
'Bolter
Oil changes on a trailer queen or a weekend cruiser probably need to be done on about a 6 month interval, regardless of mileage just to minimize the amount of condensation that's trapped in the crankcase. If the engine gets up to full operating temperature a couple of times a week during a 30 minute drive, a 2K mile oil and filter change interval sounds about right. My 04 Ram 1500 gets an oil and filter every 5K miles or so, but it spends most of its time on the highway at 70 MPH, about 1500 miles a week. That makes oil changes happen every month or two.
Jerry


The murder victim was drowned in a bathtub full of Rice Krispies and milk.
The coroner blamed the crime on a cereal killer!

Cringe and wail in fear, Eloi- - - - -we Morlocks are on the hunt!

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