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Re: Short in lighting circuit
clrh2ofrank #1399540 Mon Mar 01 2021 06:14 PM
Joined: Mar 2010
Posts: 305
B
Curmudgeon
I just quickly scanned your previous post about converting to alternator.
Are you using a 6 volt light switch in a truck converted to 12 volt?

Re: Short in lighting circuit
buoymaker #1399563 Mon Mar 01 2021 08:31 PM
Joined: Sep 2011
Posts: 856
B
'Bolter
Originally Posted by buoymaker
I just quickly scanned your previous post about converting to alternator.
Are you using a 6 volt light switch in a truck converted to 12 volt?

Same thing I was getting at, question wasn't answered.


BC
1960 Chevy C10 driver 235 T5 3.73 dana 44
1949 GMC 250 project in waiting
1960 C60 pasture art
G.M dealer tech since 1980 & counting
Re: Short in lighting circuit
clrh2ofrank #1399572 Mon Mar 01 2021 09:39 PM
Joined: Feb 2004
Posts: 22,144
H
'Bolter
The 6 volt light switch circuit breaker carries more current than the 12 volt item- - - -it's a non-issue.
Jerry


The murder victim was drowned in a bathtub full of Rice Krispies and milk.
The coroner blamed the crime on a cereal killer!

Cringe and wail in fear, Eloi- - - - -we Morlocks are on the hunt!
Re: Short in lighting circuit
clrh2ofrank #1399601 Mon Mar 01 2021 11:27 PM
Joined: May 2005
Posts: 8,016
B
Sir Searchalot
I am with Gord. It can be a loose or half broken wire. Making and breaking due to vibration/shaking while driving. It can be a connector with corroded contacts and the vibration, again, causes intermittency, You would want to see if it does it sitting still with motor off. Then start motor and check. Then shake truck and it's wires.

If you think it's the dimmer switch, there are three terminals. Battery (B) terminal and the other two terminals are Lo beam and Hi beam. Does not make any difference which is which for those two. Just take off either the lo or hi wire off it's terminal and put it on the battery terminal. (Two on one terminal). Turn on lights and take it for a ride. Then put the wire back on it's location and try the other onto the battery terminal. Drive it again. This will bypass the switch and tell you good info. Logic will then solve it. Report results.

It's OK can to consider a short, but don't focus on that alone. May not be a short. I would also check those terminal blocks on the inner fender. I always recommend getting rid of those and splicing wires. (Solder wrap and heat shrink sleeving)

Do not dwell on the "interrupter" or the headlight switch.

I believe each headlight has it's own separate ground wire attached to the immediate chassis. So if both headlights are going out, it's not that particular ground. One will not affect the other. The only other grounds involved are the large frame to battery, body to battery, motor to battery ground combination you have.


Watch out for careful drivers!!!
I'm away on an ego trip. Will be back on Feb 30.
I'm not an Auto Mechanic, but I play one on TV.
I charge $0.02 for every opinion and I take Paypal.
Plan B is always better than plan A, by definition.
You can't teach a new dog old tricks.


Re: Short in lighting circuit
buoymaker #1399665 Tue Mar 02 2021 04:50 AM
Joined: Jan 2019
Posts: 95
C
'Bolter
I am 12 volt and have a 12 volt head light switch. Thanks for the suggestions. i have been getting power for the turnsignals from the down side of the brake fuse because it was always hot. Turn signals and flasher were itermittent with the head lights. Today was my birthday so the family thought they should keep me busy. i did take the turnsignal power wire off the brake fuse and drove it. did not see the problem.
Took the poitive cable loose from the battery and put a volt meter between the cable and the post. got 12+ volts with the everything off. Sure wish each of the circuits was fused individually. it would be easier to trouble shoot. Dimmer switch is new and wiring is clean and tight. thanks again for your help.

Re: Short in lighting circuit
clrh2ofrank #1399704 Tue Mar 02 2021 04:41 PM
Joined: Mar 2010
Posts: 305
B
Curmudgeon
**** Happy Birthday *****

Agree with Jerry on the 6V vs 12V light switch. Unfortunately it does not eliminate a possible over-current causing the bi-metallic 12V switch to open.

A shot in the dark here. Clrh2ofrank, when you converted your truck to 12V, did you happen to add relays to switch on your head lights?

Your statement:
Took the poitive cable loose from the battery and put a volt meter between the cable and the post. got 12+ volts with the everything off.

If everything is turned off, you pulled off the positive terminal cable and measured 12V between the cable and positive battery post then my poor brain says you should have read 0 volts. If you read any voltage at all then there has to be current flow through your meter. This means something is still connected or using power. You didn't mention anything about problems with your battery draining and having to recharge it.

Re: Short in lighting circuit
clrh2ofrank #1399719 Tue Mar 02 2021 06:11 PM
Joined: Feb 2004
Posts: 22,144
H
'Bolter
Using a voltmeter for that test is a waste of time. it's going to show battery terminal voltage regardless of whether current is flowing or not. Try using the "milliamp" scale on a digital multimeter, or an ice pick style test light. If the light glows, or the parasitic drain is over about 75 milliamps or so, you've got a leak to ground somewhere. Neither one will have anything whatsoever to do with the circuit breaker on the light switch cycling on and off.
Jerry


The murder victim was drowned in a bathtub full of Rice Krispies and milk.
The coroner blamed the crime on a cereal killer!

Cringe and wail in fear, Eloi- - - - -we Morlocks are on the hunt!
Re: Short in lighting circuit
buoymaker #1399720 Tue Mar 02 2021 06:12 PM
Joined: Jan 2019
Posts: 95
C
'Bolter
Did not add Relays to switch on head lights.
i was expecting to get zero also. since i go 12 volts led me to believe i had a short.
i returned on alternator thinking i had a diode failed. have not had the problem since. It would take a week or two to run battery down.
thanks for your help.

i just drove it again. Using the bright light inicator as my guide. drove 23 miles with bright lights on before the lights started cycling. Returned home about 10 miles and lights cycled all the way home. pulled in shop and the lights were still cycling. removed the wire from brake fuse to turnsignals no change. replaced wire to turnsignals. turned headlights off for about five minutes. when i turned them back on waited with engine running all this time the cycling did not start again.

Re: Short in lighting circuit
clrh2ofrank #1399721 Tue Mar 02 2021 06:13 PM
Joined: Jan 2019
Posts: 95
C
'Bolter
thanks for the heads up on the test light will go try a test light.

Re: Short in lighting circuit
clrh2ofrank #1399722 Tue Mar 02 2021 06:26 PM
Joined: Jan 2019
Posts: 95
C
'Bolter
Used an ice pick test light. No light. I did check the light across the battery to make sure the bulb was not burned out. I'm speculating that means i do not have a continous short and it is probably an open?

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