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Transmission mount pad
#1392263 Mon Jan 11 2021 07:38 PM
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 4,020
Housekeeping (Moderator) Making a Stovebolt Bed & Paint and Body Shop Forums
Drug my transmission mount ('51 3-speed) out to do a little clean up on it. The rubber between the two riveted plates is still there, but in pretty sad shape. I also discovered that one of the mount ears had been welded back in place, which might account for why part of the rubber is missing.

Has anyone tried using pourable polyurethane to restore the pad? I looked at some of the material available and have some questions about it.
Anyone know what hardness the pad should be if I attempt it? I'm thinking about 65 Shore. I think it would be easy enough to clean out the old stuff (basically burn it out) and make a form to keep the parts in position till it cures. I know that replacements are available, but ~$75 for a repop or ~120 for revulcanization is a bit steep. Besides, I like to try fixing things myself.


Kevin
First car '29 Ford Special Coupe
#2 - '29 Ford pickup restored from the ground up.
Newest Project - 51 Chevy 3100 work truck. Photos [flickr.com]
Busting rust since the mid-60's
Re: Transmission mount pad
klhansen #1392264 Mon Jan 11 2021 08:18 PM
Joined: Jun 2011
Posts: 4,119
E
'Bolter
Kevin,

I get snowplow neoprene grader blade mat’l for such jobs, comes in rolls 1” thick by 4” wide, of course cannot vulcanize it, but has lots of uses, relatively cheap. Ought to be some where you live.

Ed


'37 GMC T-18 w/ DD 4-53T, RTO-610, 6231 aux., '95 GMC running gear, full disc brakes, power steering, 22.5 wheels and tires.
'47 GMC 1 ton w/ 302, NP-540, 4wd, full width Blazer front axle.
'54 GMC 630 w/ 503 gasser, 5 speed, ex fire truck, shortened WB 4', install 8' bed.
'55 GMC 370 w/270, 420 4 speed, grain, dump bed truck from ND. Works OK.
Re: Transmission mount pad
klhansen #1392272 Mon Jan 11 2021 09:26 PM
Joined: Aug 2018
Posts: 559
2
'Bolter
I would humbly suggest to consider the operating environment for a bit before choosing a material
I’m not sure where exactly this mount is
But if it’s like my trucks that whole area is messy and hot with trace amounts of everything found in the engine bay


If the part will be exposed to motor oil or traces of gasoline then perhaps neoprene is not considered a suitable material as it score at the bottom of chemical compatibility charts for both of those items (unacceptable for use in contact with/)

Heat and incompatible chemicals is going to lead to premature failure
Sure it might last a while but it won’t be anything like using a compatible material while going though the effort of rebuilding it.

What I do in cases like this,
Look up chemical compatibility charts online
Make a list of the best few materials for your application
hunt sources for those materials while considering how you would mold or machine them for your application
-s

Re: Transmission mount pad
klhansen #1392278 Mon Jan 11 2021 11:06 PM
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 4,020
Housekeeping (Moderator) Making a Stovebolt Bed & Paint and Body Shop Forums
The transmission mount is right under the u-joint ball of the torque tube. Can be oily (especially when a bolt is left out - which was the case on mine), but not hot. I think Polyurethane would stand up to oil pretty well. It will have to be a pourable substance that sets up, because there are two plates riveted together and a center plate with larger holes in it so the mount "floats" without metal-to-metal contact.

Attached Files
IMG_3637.JPG (364.59 KB, 189 downloads)

Kevin
First car '29 Ford Special Coupe
#2 - '29 Ford pickup restored from the ground up.
Newest Project - 51 Chevy 3100 work truck. Photos [flickr.com]
Busting rust since the mid-60's
Re: Transmission mount pad
klhansen #1392282 Mon Jan 11 2021 11:29 PM
Joined: Apr 2009
Posts: 560
H
'Bolter
I purchased one of the reproduction mount many of the vendors sell. The metal parts are okay but the rubber part is thinner than stock and it is all held together with bolts. You could cut or grind the rivets out of your stock unit and just bolt it back together with a suitable piece of rubber between. The stall mats used for horses might work, maybe a little too thick but would hold up to oil. I put my stock mount back in last time I had everything apart. If you would like to try the aftermarket mount I will send it to you for the price of shipping.

Last edited by Hookalatch; Mon Jan 11 2021 11:30 PM.
Re: Transmission mount pad
klhansen #1392291 Tue Jan 12 2021 12:47 AM
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 1,968
P
AD Addict
I installed one that I purchased from Classic Parts [classicparts.com] that was riveted and not bolted. It was missing when I bought my truck so when I reinstalled the engine and tranny after a recent rebuild, I also installed the new rear tranny mount. I personally was impressed with the quality and it was one of the only aftermarket parts I bought that did not have to be tweaked.

Last edited by Phak1; Tue Jan 12 2021 12:47 AM.

Phil

1952 Chevrolet 3100
Project Journals
‘59 235 & hydraulic lifters
“Three on the Tree” & 4:11 torque tube
12v w/ Alternator
Re: Transmission mount pad
klhansen #1392292 Tue Jan 12 2021 12:53 AM
Joined: Feb 2004
Posts: 22,578
H
'Bolter
Try using pieces of sidewall material cut from a worn out 18-wheeler tire. The stuff is as tough as woodpecker lips, and layers can be stacked if a thicker cushion is required.
Jerry


The murder victim was drowned in a bathtub full of Rice Krispies and milk.
The coroner blamed the crime on a cereal killer!

Cringe and wail in fear, Eloi- - - - -we Morlocks are on the hunt!
Re: Transmission mount pad
Hotrod Lincoln #1392294 Tue Jan 12 2021 01:04 AM
Joined: Mar 2019
Posts: 1,274
G
'Bolter
Originally Posted by Hotrod Lincoln
Try using pieces of sidewall material cut from a worn out 18-wheeler tire. The stuff is as tough as woodpecker lips, and layers can be stacked if a thicker cushion is required.
Jerry

You do have a way with words. 😆

Re: Transmission mount pad
klhansen #1392296 Tue Jan 12 2021 01:13 AM
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 1,968
P
AD Addict
The thickness of the rubber I believe is critical. Once you install the front and rear engine mounts, the rear of the transmission where the mount is attached, does not have allot of movement. If you change the thickness one direction or the other too much, I believe you would put undue stress on the other mounts.


Phil

1952 Chevrolet 3100
Project Journals
‘59 235 & hydraulic lifters
“Three on the Tree” & 4:11 torque tube
12v w/ Alternator
Re: Transmission mount pad
klhansen #1392309 Tue Jan 12 2021 01:42 AM
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 4,020
Housekeeping (Moderator) Making a Stovebolt Bed & Paint and Body Shop Forums
Cutting the rivets is an option that I may use, but the issue is that sandwiching flat rubber between the plates wouldn't deal with the horizontal positioning that having the space between the rivets/bolts filled with material would. It's possible that it could slip and make metal-to-metal contact.
Chuck, I will keep that in mind.
Phil, I agree that it should be in the same position as original, which wouldn't be that hard to do with pourable polyurethane.
I'm not sure if tire sidewall would be the right softness/hardness to cushion things properly. I think tires are around 70 Shore hardness, which might be too hard. No-one knows what the hardness of the original rubber is? That's probably lost to time. The rubber in my existing mount is pretty soft, but may have been affected by the oil soaking it.

Last edited by klhansen; Tue Jan 12 2021 01:48 AM.

Kevin
First car '29 Ford Special Coupe
#2 - '29 Ford pickup restored from the ground up.
Newest Project - 51 Chevy 3100 work truck. Photos [flickr.com]
Busting rust since the mid-60's
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