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Re: Brake questions: modified '57 3600
oldbolter #1382990 Sat Oct 31 2020 09:39 PM
Joined: Mar 2007
Posts: 924
T
Crusty Old Sarge
That was my thoughts... I have never seen one mounted in the rear brake line. I was just assuming (probably wrong) that it had work prior to this.


Craig

Come,Bleed or Blister somethings got to give!!!
59' Apache 31, 327 V8, Muncie M20 4 Speed, GM 10 Bolt Rear... long term project (30 years and counting)
Re: Brake questions: modified '57 3600
oldbolter #1383134 Mon Nov 02 2020 03:52 AM
Joined: Feb 2004
Posts: 21,586
H
Boltergeist
A RPV is designed to maintain a slight amount of pressure in the brake lines at all times. On rear drum brakes with strong return springs that retract the shoes when the brake pedal is released, and relatively small diameter wheel cylinder cups, a 10 PSI valve is needed to keep the wheel cylinder cups expanded against the walls of the cylinder to avoid air getting past the cups and a spongy pedal developing. Since the only thing that tries to retract a disc brake caliper piston is the distortion of the square O ring as the piston pushes against the pad, and the large diameter of the piston, a 2 pound valve is all that can be used without causing the disc brake to drag. Most of the hydraulic brake light switches I've seen were either located at the master cylinder outlet fitting on single-line brake systems, or in the rear brake line like 1950's MOPAR vehicles. Virtually all auto manufacturers went to pedal-mounted brake switches in the late 1950's or early 60's, mostly because of the proximity to the steering column, and the necessity to incorporate a discriminator circuit to the brake lights on vehicles factory equipped with turn signals.
Jerry


The murder victim was drowned in a bathtub full of Rice Krispies and milk.
The coroner blamed the crime on a cereal killer!

Cringe and wail in fear, Eloi- - - - -we Morlocks are on the hunt!
Re: Brake questions: modified '57 3600
oldbolter #1385975 Thu Nov 26 2020 04:02 AM
Joined: Aug 2009
Posts: 142
O
Shop Shark
It just dawned on me that I didn't let everyone know what finally fixed my problem with the brake lights. The solution was simple: I replaced the brake light pressure switch. Apparently the old switch had gone bad and wasn't shutting off completely when the brakes were released. Thanks to everyone for the help.


Oldbolter
1959 Apache 3800 dually flat bed/dump with 261

1956 3800 dually flat bed/dump with 235

1957 3600 flat bed, 350 engine, 700R4, PS, disc brakes, 14 bolt rear with 4.11 gears
Re: Brake questions: modified '57 3600
oldbolter #1386004 Thu Nov 26 2020 02:23 PM
Joined: Mar 2007
Posts: 924
T
Crusty Old Sarge
Sometimes we make the BIGGEST problems out of the smallest solutions. My Auto Shop teacher was a firm believer in the " KISS" method (Keep It Simple Stupid), from time to time I have to relearn that. Glad you worked it out.


Craig

Come,Bleed or Blister somethings got to give!!!
59' Apache 31, 327 V8, Muncie M20 4 Speed, GM 10 Bolt Rear... long term project (30 years and counting)
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