The Stovebolt.com Forums Home | FAQ | Forum | Swap Meet | Gallery | Tech Tips | Events | Features | Search | Hoo-Ya Shop
Helping out ...


EVENTS

Check in for status!

Jump over to the Events Forum, to post events -- new ones or the ones we have been enjoying for some time.
Look to see what's been cancelled or postponed.

Encourage one another!

Stovebolt Site Search
 
Old Truck Calendars
Months of truck photos!
Nothing like an old truck calendar

Stovebolt Calendars

Check for details!


Who's Online Now
2 members (Ga92009, agedhorse), 181 guests, and 2 robots.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Forum Statistics
Forums50
Topics121,365
Posts977,665
Members44,213
Most Online1,229
Jan 21st, 2020
Image Posting Policy
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
67 Suburban patch panel installation
#1383278 Tue Nov 03 2020 02:50 AM
Joined: Dec 2002
Posts: 3,919
Moderator - The Electrical Bay and Rocky Mountain Bolters
I know that patch panel welding has probably been discussed numerous times here. However, I have a 15 minute time limit with my searches! "Weld patch panel" comes up with a plethora of non-related issues. Frankly, I got tired of looking through the posts for my answer.

I finally broke down and ordered the lower rear quarter patch panels for my 67 Suburban. They have not come in yet, but I am trying to decide on how to install them.

Should I overlap the panels (with the new panel inside the existing panel)? My thoughts are to sheet metal screw them together, then weld and grind the seams, then smooth with bondo.

Should I try to get my cuts aligned and butt weld them?

Thanks for the assistance.


Another quality post.


Real Trucks Rattle

HELP! The Paranoids are after me!
Re: 67 Suburban patch panel installation
Rusty Rod #1383282 Tue Nov 03 2020 03:14 AM
Joined: Sep 2017
Posts: 105
D
Shop Shark
Hey Rusty, I’m a complete noob at welding but in what I’ve done so far I prefer by far is to have a tight joint and butt weld. It takes a lot more time to slowly sand away material to ensure your butt joint is tight but to me it’s much easier to weld than a lap joint and there is no gap for moisture to get in. I’m sure there’s people on here with far more experience than me that will guide you better, good luck!


1950 Chevrolet 1/2-Ton 3100
Re: 67 Suburban patch panel installation
Rusty Rod #1383284 Tue Nov 03 2020 03:34 AM
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 3,251
Housekeeping (Moderator) Making a Stovebolt Bed & Paint and Body Shop Forums
Rusty
Refine your search to posts by user MPandC (Robert). He won't lead you astray. I would agree with Dongray about using a butt weld. On a quarter panel that welds to a door pillar, it makes it relatively easy to line up and scribe the patch panel for cutting. Then trim it a tiny bit large and cut down to fit closely. As long as you can get a dolly behind the joint area, that's the way to go. Robert has posted an example of a "ghost line" that's visible in a finished panel that had a lap joint patch.
I'm definitely a disciple of Robert's procedures (although I'm nowhere as talented as he is.) I've tried to take pictures of fitting and welding patches. You're welcome to scan through the photos linked in my signature to see what I've done.


Kevin
First car '29 Ford Special Coupe
#2 - '29 Ford pickup restored from the ground up.
Newest Project - 51 Chevy 3100 work truck. Photos [flickr.com]
Busting rust since the mid-60's
Re: 67 Suburban patch panel installation
Rusty Rod #1383300 Tue Nov 03 2020 11:33 AM
Joined: Jul 2011
Posts: 704
M
Shop Shark
Check out the sticky at the top of the page.... no searching needed!



https://www.stovebolt.com/ubbthread...-tricks-for-sheet-metal.html#Post1023791




…...and to show the effects of a ghost line that Kevin spoke of, this video shows a ghost line in the rear tailgate of a wagon that had been repaired using a step flange to attach the patch panel at the bottom.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OGhFEfVqxb0


This occurs because you have two thicknesses of metal to one side of the weld seam, and one to the other side. A single thickness will expand and contract more quickly than two thicknesses. Given enough heating/cooling cycles, this differing expansion/contraction rates will cause a ghost line to appear in your paint finish showing EXACTLY where the repair was made. Using butt welds will help to eliminate this .. Planishing, grinding welds flush, as discussed in the sticky thread help to eliminate it further.


.

Re: 67 Suburban patch panel installation
Rusty Rod #1383337 Tue Nov 03 2020 04:32 PM
Joined: Dec 2002
Posts: 3,919
Moderator - The Electrical Bay and Rocky Mountain Bolters
Thanks MPandC... it's the LAST place I'd think about looking!!!


Another quality post.


Real Trucks Rattle

HELP! The Paranoids are after me!

Moderated by  HandyAndy, klhansen 

Link Copied to Clipboard
Home | FAQ | Forum | Swap Meet | Gallery | Tech Tips | Events | Features | Search | Hoo-Ya Shop
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.4