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a couple of '54 235 mysteries
#1379566 Mon Oct 05 2020 01:16 AM
Joined: Mar 2010
Posts: 9,449
5
52Carl Offline OP
Master Gabster
I tore down a '54 235 truck engine today and found a couple of mysteries.
#1. The main bearing cap bolts had heavy split lock washes under them? Do they belong there?
#2. The oddball head bolt with the groove in the head and the hole drilled in the end of it was on this engine. I have included pics of the block and head #s indicating that they are '54 parts.

Attached Files
head casting.JPG (300.6 KB, 236 downloads)
bloock casting.JPG (252.88 KB, 230 downloads)
Re: a couple of '54 235 mysteries
52Carl #1379568 Mon Oct 05 2020 01:33 AM
Joined: Feb 2004
Posts: 21,206
H
Boltergeist
A split lock washer under a main bearing bolt is a really bad idea, as they usually spread out at the split and let the bolt lose its torque. If a washer is used at all, it would need to be a hardened Grade 8 SAE flat washer, never a lock washer of any kind. The head bolt with the slot across the top is one with a 1/16" hole drilled through the center, and another hole at right angles intersecting it above the threaded part of the bolt. It's there to adapt the oil circuit to the rocker arms on certain cylinder head/rocker arm combinations. That bolt is supposed to be located at the center of the head on the passenger's side, and if there's a piece of 3/16" tubing from the pushrod valley to the oil connector in the center of the rocket arms, that bolt isn't needed.
Jerry


The murder victim was drowned in a bathtub full of Rice Krispies and milk.
The coroner blamed the crime on a cereal killer!

Cringe and wail in fear, Eloi- - - - -we Morlocks are on the hunt!
Re: a couple of '54 235 mysteries
52Carl #1379569 Mon Oct 05 2020 01:39 AM
Joined: Sep 2001
Posts: 30,561
ace skiver


Tim
1954Advance-Design.com [1954advance-design.com]
1954 3106 Carryall Suburban [stovebolt.com] - part of the family for 49 years
1954 3104 5-window pickup w/Hydra-Matic [1954advance-design.com] - part of the family for 15 years
- If you have to stomp on your foot-pedal starter, either you, or your starter, or your engine, has a problem.
- The 216 and early 235 engines are not "splash oilers" - this is a splash oiler. [chevy.oldcarmanualproject.com]
Re: a couple of '54 235 mysteries
52Carl #1379620 Mon Oct 05 2020 02:07 PM
Joined: Jan 2001
Posts: 5,029
P
Master Gabster
Split washers were used on 216’s and early 235’s. If you try to leave them out, the bolts will likely bottom out before they tighten against the cap. Thats been my experience.


See the USA in your vintage Chevrolet!
My Blog
Re: a couple of '54 235 mysteries
52Carl #1379629 Mon Oct 05 2020 03:23 PM
Joined: Dec 2017
Posts: 824
D
Shop Shark
What the presence of those washers and bolt tell you is that someone who may or may not have known what they were doing was into that motor at one time or another and you should pay attention to every detail as who knows what other "tricks" were used on this motor.


Mike
Re: a couple of '54 235 mysteries
52Carl #1379673 Mon Oct 05 2020 09:44 PM
Joined: Jan 2001
Posts: 5,029
P
Master Gabster
Nothing seems amiss here. Split washers were used from the factory up until 1954 (see parts book listings), and 1955 1st truck.

Attached Files
47665CD6-1387-4DD5-A1D6-F81EFC42AD1C.jpeg (259.75 KB, 163 downloads)
0DED8B26-6482-4FDE-BCBF-B058E5EBF06C.jpeg (342.01 KB, 161 downloads)

See the USA in your vintage Chevrolet!
My Blog
Re: a couple of '54 235 mysteries
52Carl #1379685 Mon Oct 05 2020 11:48 PM
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 1,551
W
Shop Shark
Dave,

Did the use of split washers continue to the '61 261? Mine had front cap bolts with no washers but was that something the rebuilder did on his own?


1948 3/4-Ton 5-Window Flatbed Chevrolet [sandeace.com]

28 Years of Daily Driving but now on hiatus. With a '61 261, 848 head, Rochester Monojet carb, SM420 4-speed, 4.10 rear, dual reservoir MC, Bendix up front, 235/85R16 tires, 12-volt w/alternator, electric wipers and a modern radio in the glove box.
Re: a couple of '54 235 mysteries
52Carl #1379693 Tue Oct 06 2020 12:25 AM
Joined: Jan 2001
Posts: 5,029
P
Master Gabster
261’s follow a slightly different time line for changes, but I am sure they dropped the split washers close to 1955 1st series.


See the USA in your vintage Chevrolet!
My Blog
Re: a couple of '54 235 mysteries
52Carl #1379694 Tue Oct 06 2020 12:28 AM
Joined: Aug 2012
Posts: 120
1
Shop Shark
The major downside of the split washer that I recently encountered, also on a 54 235, was that when when loosening the bolt to check bearing clearances, the split washer would rotate some and cut chips off the bearing cap. Of course they fall into the engine and then you get to re-clean everything.

Re: a couple of '54 235 mysteries
52Carl #1379759 Tue Oct 06 2020 05:23 PM
Joined: May 2005
Posts: 66
A
Wrench Fetcher
Split lock washers have long been considered marginal at best for securing a robust threaded joint. When a split lockwasher is fully compressed flat it has no retaining "bite" at the split and actually becomes a flat washer with a crack. The tensile spring force created by the compression of the washer contributes only around 10% of the torque preload. The rest is covered by bolt stretch.
For the washer to bite and provide a lock the bolt will need to back off a bit but then the clamp load is lessened and you're joint has failed.
The best lockwasher for high preloads is a conical washer with serrated faces.
For the most part though using the tensile bolt stretch to clamp the load is the best approach and is the norm.


1951 Chevy 1/2 ton
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