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1934-36 Chevy fuel pump
#1378595 Sat Sep 26 2020 11:18 PM
Joined: Mar 2010
Posts: 926
Y
yar Offline OP
Shop Shark
Have any of you figured out a way to straighten the part of the fuel pump casting bent down by over tightening the bail wire that secures the glass bowl without breaking the casting? The casting of one fuel pump I saved for internal parts is already irreparably cracked so just to see what would happen I tried bending a part of the casting cold and it broke like a piece of glass. Ferrous metals go through color changes with increasing heat so there are no surprises when heating it to form or weld it. Aluminum, however, forms an oxide when heated that has a higher melting temperature than the aluminum itself, concealing what the aluminum under the oxide is doing. The metallurgy of a fuel pump is a mystery to me so I don't know if it will become malleable when heated or what.

An option is leaving it bent and truing the inner surface that the glass bowl seats on using the milling machine and rotary table.

I've figured out a simple modification to strengthen the bail attachment area of the casting to prevent further bending. It's a barely noticeable, simple piece of aluminum flat bar bridging across the casting giving solid support to the bail attachment areas. With that piece of flat bar in place tightening the bail will not bend the casting.

If any of you amateur engineers/machinists/welders out there have any suggestions I would appreciate hearing them,

Ray W


Ray
Re: 1934-36 Chevy fuel pump
yar #1378603 Sun Sep 27 2020 12:21 AM
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 3,658
Housekeeping (Moderator) Making a Stovebolt Bed & Paint and Body Shop Forums
I haven't done it, but I think it was Carbking who figured out a method to straighten Rochester Carbs buy heating them in an oven with a fixture. I'll bet a similar method could be used for your fuel pump, being pot metal, just like the carbs.


Kevin
First car '29 Ford Special Coupe
#2 - '29 Ford pickup restored from the ground up.
Newest Project - 51 Chevy 3100 work truck. Photos [flickr.com]
Busting rust since the mid-60's
Re: 1934-36 Chevy fuel pump
yar #1378606 Sun Sep 27 2020 12:29 AM
Joined: Aug 2018
Posts: 319
D
Shop Shark
The fuel pump casting is a zinc alloy, probably one of the ZAMAK alloys, in particular. Similar, if not the same as what is used in the carburetors. With heat, a jig, and patience, the castings can be straightened. There are threads in the forum on straightening the warped airhorn of Rochester B/BC carbs. Same principles should apply.

While I was typing this, Kevin's post appeared. LOL.

I believe Jon G is one of the forum experts. Here's one of his threads on straightening a Rochester carb airhorn that may help.

Doug

Last edited by drdoug; Sun Sep 27 2020 01:00 AM.
Re: 1934-36 Chevy fuel pump
yar #1378633 Sun Sep 27 2020 03:50 AM
Joined: Mar 2010
Posts: 926
Y
yar Offline OP
Shop Shark
Kevin & Doug.

Thank you so much for steering me towards Jon's method. That is great information. My computer skills are lousy but I'm going to see if my wife will help me make a print version of both Jon's text and photos.

400 degrees seems to be the target temperature. I wonder what the most practical way is to know the temperature inside my table top propane BBQ?

Thanks again guys!

Ray W


Ray
Re: 1934-36 Chevy fuel pump
yar #1378635 Sun Sep 27 2020 04:01 AM
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 3,658
Housekeeping (Moderator) Making a Stovebolt Bed & Paint and Body Shop Forums
I knew, I'd seen that thread somewhere. Doug is the guy for tracking it down. thumbs_up
And it was the other Jon that posted it. blush

Might be a bit hard to regulate temp inside a BBQ, but you could check temp with a digital infrared thermometer.
Or you could just use your wife's oven when she's off somewhere. eeeek


Kevin
First car '29 Ford Special Coupe
#2 - '29 Ford pickup restored from the ground up.
Newest Project - 51 Chevy 3100 work truck. Photos [flickr.com]
Busting rust since the mid-60's
Re: 1934-36 Chevy fuel pump
klhansen #1378836 Mon Sep 28 2020 10:02 PM
Joined: Aug 2018
Posts: 319
D
Shop Shark
Thanks, Kevin.

Not wanting to risk the aftermath of using the kitchen oven, I picked up locally a mid-sized, used Blue-M lab oven a couple years ago. Not pretty, but it works. Interior shelves are 11" x 16" and the useable height is about 16". The temperature controller isn't calibrated, but set with a simple liquid-filled thermometer (the oven has a thermometer mounting clamp and hole in the top), it holds a stable temperature, up to 200 deg C (392 deg F). Good enough for casting work, but I mostly use it at 80 deg C to bake small to mid-size painted parts. Model SW-17TA. Very simple construction, and with some luck, can be found for $25-$50 from industrial surplus sellers. Mine needed the power cord replaced.

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Last edited by drdoug; Tue Sep 29 2020 05:49 PM.

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