The Stovebolt Page Forums Home | FAQ | Forum | Swap Meet | Gallery | Tech Tips | Events | Features | Search | Hoo-Ya Shop
Helping out ...


EVENTS

Check in for status!

Jump over to the Events Forum, to post events -- new ones or the ones we have been enjoying for some time.
Look to see what's been cancelled or postponed.

Encourage one another!

Stovebolt Site Search
 
Old Truck Calendars
Months of truck photos!
Nothing like an old truck calendar

Stovebolt Calendars

Check for details!


Who's Online Now
6 members (Fox, 46paneltruck, Mickey3100, MT53, 3B, dands), 193 guests, and 3 robots.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Forum Statistics
Forums50
Topics121,036
Posts970,293
Members43,817
Most Online1,229
Jan 21st, 2020
Image Posting Policy
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Page 2 of 2 1 2
Re: Oil Pan Question
Green_98 #1373886 Tue Aug 18 2020 04:51 AM
Joined: Feb 2004
Posts: 21,047
H
Boltergeist
There's a simple way to enlarge a hole in the oil pan to make it big enough to insert a rivet without drilling- - - - -use an ice pick, an awl, or a tapered punch. No shavings, and no danger of bearing damage. Pop a steel river into the hole, clean up and sand the outside, and lay on a layer of sealer.
Jerry


The murder victim was drowned in a bathtub full of Rice Krispies and milk.
The coroner blamed the crime on a cereal killer!

Cringe and wail in fear, Eloi- - - - -we Morlocks are on the hunt!
Re: Oil Pan Question
Wally / Montana #1373910 Tue Aug 18 2020 01:39 PM
Joined: Mar 2014
Posts: 1,665
J
Shop Shark
Originally Posted by Wally / Montana
The best solvent that I use for cleaning off oil, fir pitch out of clothing, etc. is BBQ lighter fluid outdoors in a well-ventilated space. It doesn't much affect car paint, most plastic, clothing dyes, etc (test it first).

Old acetone can have reacted with itself (shame on you, acetone!) to produce a condensation product that is less volatile and might be a bit oily.

I use diesel fuel for crude cleaning but BBQ lighter fluid for the wipe off. A couple hours ago, I used it on the outside of my oil pan before painting. That was after Gunk degreaser.

Don't know if it still is, but that stuff used to be simple naphtha in a special can with a higher price tag.


Jon

1952 1/2 ton with 1959 235
T5 with 3.07 rear end
Re: Oil Pan Question
Green_98 #1373926 Tue Aug 18 2020 02:35 PM
Joined: Feb 2004
Posts: 21,047
H
Boltergeist
Methanol (wood alcohol) is one of the best solvents to use when you want a residue-free cleaner. There's been a lot of hype about how toxic it is when used as hand sanitizer, but generations of wood workers have used it as shellac thinner and for general cleanup without dropping dead in their tracks, as have dirt track racers with their alcohol-fueled hotrods.
Jerry


The murder victim was drowned in a bathtub full of Rice Krispies and milk.
The coroner blamed the crime on a cereal killer!

Cringe and wail in fear, Eloi- - - - -we Morlocks are on the hunt!
Re: Oil Pan Question
Green_98 #1373940 Tue Aug 18 2020 05:09 PM
Joined: Jun 2011
Posts: 3,631
E
Shop Shark
Acetone works fine, too, also a can be used as a thinner for epoxy if necessary.

Ed


'37 GMC T-18 w/ DD 4-53T, RTO-610, 6231 aux., '95 GMC running gear, full disc brakes, power steering, 22.5 wheels and tires.
'47 GMC 1 ton w/ 302, NP-540, 4wd, full width Blazer front axle.
'54 GMC 630 w/ 503 gasser, 5 speed, ex fire truck, shortened WB 4', install 8' bed.
'55 GMC 370 w/270, 420 4 speed, grain, dump bed truck from ND. Works OK.
Re: Oil Pan Question
Green_98 #1373961 Tue Aug 18 2020 09:21 PM
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 1,532
W
Shop Shark
Correction to my previous post. When the pan was cruddy and crusty, those repairs looked like epoxy. Upon cleaning, I see they have been brazed inside and out.

Last edited by Wally / Montana; Tue Aug 18 2020 09:22 PM.

1948 3/4-Ton 5-Window Flatbed Chevrolet [sandeace.com]

28 Years of Daily Driving but now on hiatus. With a '61 261, 848 head, Rochester Monojet carb, SM420 4-speed, 4.10 rear, dual reservoir MC, Bendix up front, 235/85R16 tires, 12-volt w/alternator, electric wipers and a modern radio in the glove box.
Re: Oil Pan Question
Green_98 #1374273 Fri Aug 21 2020 02:13 PM
Joined: Nov 2000
Posts: 1,969
F
Shop Shark
I don't think this part of your question was answered: 216 pans will not work on 235s.


Professional Novice
Re: Oil Pan Question
Frank50 #1374285 Fri Aug 21 2020 03:19 PM
Joined: Sep 2001
Posts: 30,471
ace skiver
Originally Posted by Frank50
I don't think this part of your question was answered: 216 pans will not work on 235s.

That is not correct for 1940-1952 216 and 235 oil pans - they were all the same pan.

Some 1953 pans and all 1954 and later pans were different.

1929-1954 Chevrolet Master Parts & Accessories Catalog [chevy.oldcarmanualproject.com]


Tim
1954Advance-Design.com [1954advance-design.com]
1954 3106 Carryall Suburban [stovebolt.com] - part of the family for 49 years
1954 3104 5-window pickup w/Hydra-Matic [1954advance-design.com] - part of the family for 15 years
- If you have to stomp on your foot-pedal starter, either you, or your starter, or your engine, has a problem.
- The 216 and early 235 engines are not "splash oilers" - this is a splash oiler. [chevy.oldcarmanualproject.com]
Re: Oil Pan Question
Green_98 #1374356 Sat Aug 22 2020 12:49 AM
Joined: Feb 2004
Posts: 21,047
H
Boltergeist
The height of the oil troughs had to be adjusted on the 235 pans to accommodate the longer stroke crankshaft. Replacement pans for the 235 engine had "235" embossed into the pan in numbers about 2" tall.
Jerry


The murder victim was drowned in a bathtub full of Rice Krispies and milk.
The coroner blamed the crime on a cereal killer!

Cringe and wail in fear, Eloi- - - - -we Morlocks are on the hunt!
Page 2 of 2 1 2

Moderated by  Woogeroo 

Link Copied to Clipboard
Home | FAQ | Forum | Swap Meet | Gallery | Tech Tips | Events | Features | Search | Hoo-Ya Shop
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.4