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Oil Pan Question
#1373642 Sun Aug 16 2020 08:35 PM
Joined: Sep 2009
Posts: 320
G
Shop Shark
Good afternoon.
I have a '55-'57 model 261 in my '53 1/2 ton, rebuilt last year, and ever since has had a pretty decent oil leak. This weekend, in an attempt to locate the leak, I cleaned the entire underside of the engine with simple green. While doing so, I noticed a very small pin-point size black dot that would re-appear when I would wipe over the area; about 2" from the oil pan drain plug. So I let it sit and after about 2 minutes, it accumulated enough oil to form a drip, and dropped. It's seeping through the pan!

So, my short term solution is to drain the oil, scuff the paint off that spot, and spread JB Weld, and re-paint after a day or two. I think, given that this pan is obviously corroded, I need to find a good replacement. (hopefully this provides a fix, and my fears of a rear main seal leak were inaccurate)

Question: Are all oil pans on 216/235/261 engines the same? If no, how do I know which one I have/need?


-Patrick
1953 Chevrolet 3100
261 / 4-speed / 4:11 / Commercial Red

Re: Oil Pan Question
Green_98 #1373694 Sun Aug 16 2020 11:46 PM
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 1,532
W
Shop Shark
I'm not recommending this at all, but old ranchers would drill a hole there and put in a sheet metal screw with rubber gasket. That's not something you'll want to do, though.


1948 3/4-Ton 5-Window Flatbed Chevrolet [sandeace.com]

28 Years of Daily Driving but now on hiatus. With a '61 261, 848 head, Rochester Monojet carb, SM420 4-speed, 4.10 rear, dual reservoir MC, Bendix up front, 235/85R16 tires, 12-volt w/alternator, electric wipers and a modern radio in the glove box.
Re: Oil Pan Question
Green_98 #1373699 Sun Aug 16 2020 11:56 PM
Joined: Sep 2010
Posts: 607
K
Shop Shark
Once you drain the oil you can scuff up the area were the pin hole is and see how bad it is ,I would think if corroded it would be on the outside .It may be able to be welded?


kevinski 1954 GMC 9300 Welcome to the virtual Garage
Re: Oil Pan Question
Green_98 #1373701 Mon Aug 17 2020 12:08 AM
Joined: Mar 2014
Posts: 1,665
J
Shop Shark
They are not all the same. The pans for passenger cars and trucks are different and some trucks also had a different design. I'll attach an image of a couple I have. I ended up using the 1956 pan on the 1959 235 because it fit the 1952 truck chassis better. In your case, I think your short term solution should work fine, but as somebody said, you can put a screw in there, too. It might help keep oil from seeping out so you could epoxy better. Just get the pan as clean as you possibly can. I've seen JB Weld fall off oil pans, auto transmission pans, etc that were repaired this way before. Good luck!

Attached Files
oil pans 1956 1959.JPG (39.29 KB, 152 downloads)

Jon

1952 1/2 ton with 1959 235
T5 with 3.07 rear end
Re: Oil Pan Question
Green_98 #1373703 Mon Aug 17 2020 12:16 AM
Joined: Feb 2004
Posts: 21,047
H
Boltergeist
Forget the JB weld- - - -use a product called "Marine-Tex". It's much better than JB where adhesion and leak sealing is concerned. Also, since rust holes are cone-shaped, you're seeing the tip of the iceberg. The hole on the inside is much larger than the pinhole that's visible. I'd suggest drilling a 1/8" or possibly a 3/16" hole where the leak is, and putting a pop rivet in the hole before applying sealer. Scuff up a radius of at least 2" around the rivet down to bare metal with coarse sandpaper- - - -80 grit or maybe even 40 grit, to give the metal some "tooth" for the sealer to grab. Drain the oil and jack up one side of the truck while you're cleaning and patching so you won't contaminate the repaired area with fresh oil while you're working on it.
Good Luck!
Jerry


The murder victim was drowned in a bathtub full of Rice Krispies and milk.
The coroner blamed the crime on a cereal killer!

Cringe and wail in fear, Eloi- - - - -we Morlocks are on the hunt!
Re: Oil Pan Question
Green_98 #1373772 Mon Aug 17 2020 03:18 PM
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 1,532
W
Shop Shark
Another thing. My pan has epoxy of some sort in a couple places. There is epoxy on the outside and inside in each place. I think doing it that way and the epoxy meeting in the middle helps to hold it in place. It can't simply flake off. Also, cleaning first to remove all oil would be important.

Last edited by Wally / Montana; Mon Aug 17 2020 03:18 PM.

1948 3/4-Ton 5-Window Flatbed Chevrolet [sandeace.com]

28 Years of Daily Driving but now on hiatus. With a '61 261, 848 head, Rochester Monojet carb, SM420 4-speed, 4.10 rear, dual reservoir MC, Bendix up front, 235/85R16 tires, 12-volt w/alternator, electric wipers and a modern radio in the glove box.
Re: Oil Pan Question
Green_98 #1373776 Mon Aug 17 2020 03:42 PM
Joined: Sep 2009
Posts: 320
G
Shop Shark
Yes i plan to scuff the paint off down to bare metal and clean very well with gasoline or carb cleaner. I'm hesitant to use anything on the inside of the oil pan, in the event a piece doesn't adhere well and flakes off. Same reason I really don't want to run a sheet metal screw with rubber washer up into the oil pan, in case a metal shaving gets into the oil.

Does anyone produce a reproduction oil pan?


-Patrick
1953 Chevrolet 3100
261 / 4-speed / 4:11 / Commercial Red

Re: Oil Pan Question
Green_98 #1373778 Mon Aug 17 2020 04:30 PM
Joined: Mar 2014
Posts: 1,665
J
Shop Shark
There used to be reproduction pans, but the problem was (as I mentioned) they didn't fit every vehicle and there wasn't a great demand. I haven't seen one for quite a while, however there could be some old stock kicking around, I suppose. I don't know if you've looked on eBay lately, but a used oil pan is going to sell for more than you can purchase an entire decent 235.

Let me pass on what I did with a gas tank for a log splitter we own in NM. The gas tank had held water before we got it and it had rusted badly...several (over 30) pin holes and some of those were about 1/8 inch or more. And the metal on the bottom part seemed thinner as a result of the rust. A new tank for the motor was $125 plus shipping, and the seller was careful to point out it wasn't an exact fit but he thought it would work with some modification. So I split the old tank at the mid-joint, cleaned it within an inch of its life, mixed JB Weld (regular, not the Kwik-Weld variety) and thinned it with acetone. The JB Weld people told me I could also use lacquer thinner, but I didn't have any handy that day. They told me to use no more than 1 teaspoon to 2 tubes of the JB Weld, but I didn't follow that advice. I added maybe twice that much, mixed it very well and then painted on a thick but uniform coat with a short hoghair brush. I did this on the top and bottom and over the lip of each part where it had been split. I let that dry/cure for a few days and then I epoxied the two halves of the tank back together and let that cure. Never have had a problem and that was over 3 years ago.

However, I think if I had to repair an oil pan, the best way would be to drain and remove it, clean it like crazy, inspect well and find all holes and use my oxy-acetylene torch to braze every one of them very nicely. You could also use silver bearing solder (buy the Harris StayBrite and be sure to get the flux with it...they sell a small pack in a plastic tube: https://www.harrisproductsgroup.com...ng/Lead-Free-Solders/Stay-Brite-Kit.aspx ) and a common MAPP torch. Either of those fixes isn't hard to do and will last about a week past forever if you do them right.


Jon

1952 1/2 ton with 1959 235
T5 with 3.07 rear end
Re: Oil Pan Question
Green_98 #1373879 Tue Aug 18 2020 03:08 AM
Joined: Jan 2003
Posts: 303
H
Shop Shark
Gasoline is a poor choice for leaving a clean surface. Gasoline is a complex mixture of low to high boiling hydrocarbons, the highest having boiling points of over 400 deg F. These higher boiling components are low in concentration but will leave a very slight oily residue. Acetone would be a much better choice. Lacquer thinner should be OK also.


Harold Wilson
41 Chevy 3/4 Ton
Re: Oil Pan Question
Green_98 #1373880 Tue Aug 18 2020 03:17 AM
Joined: May 2001
Posts: 1,532
W
Shop Shark
The best solvent that I use for cleaning off oil, fir pitch out of clothing, etc. is BBQ lighter fluid outdoors in a well-ventilated space. It doesn't much affect car paint, most plastic, clothing dyes, etc (test it first).

Old acetone can have reacted with itself (shame on you, acetone!) to produce a condensation product that is less volatile and might be a bit oily.

I use diesel fuel for crude cleaning but BBQ lighter fluid for the wipe off. A couple hours ago, I used it on the outside of my oil pan before painting. That was after Gunk degreaser.


1948 3/4-Ton 5-Window Flatbed Chevrolet [sandeace.com]

28 Years of Daily Driving but now on hiatus. With a '61 261, 848 head, Rochester Monojet carb, SM420 4-speed, 4.10 rear, dual reservoir MC, Bendix up front, 235/85R16 tires, 12-volt w/alternator, electric wipers and a modern radio in the glove box.
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