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Re: Any home electrician out there????
WE b OLD #1373404 Fri Aug 14 2020 11:31 PM
Joined: Mar 2010
Posts: 125
B
Curmudgeon
Ditto on the aluminum wiring. All the outlets, switches etc. must be rated for AL or AL/CU. Once a year I had to check tightness of the connections.

Re: Any home electrician out there????
WE b OLD #1373598 Sun Aug 16 2020 03:08 PM
Joined: Mar 2008
Posts: 1,988
W
Shop Shark
Sounds like a Neutral problem to me. I'll also second the Aluminum wiring issue. They could've shared neutrals for more than one circuit. The Aluminum wire will corrode under wire nuts, switches, receptacles, if not properly rated for AL wire. Not to mention, just fatigue/heat over time.


1954 3600 Chevy Truck
"The Fake Truck"
In the Stovebolt Gallery
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Re: Any home electrician out there????
WE b OLD #1373605 Sun Aug 16 2020 03:51 PM
Joined: Mar 2014
Posts: 1,645
J
Shop Shark
It isn't common to wire ceiling lights on the same circuit with electric plugs, but I've seen some do it. In many areas, that won't pass a code inspection, but some allow it.
The reasoning is you don't want a room to go dark because somebody is running a hair dryer, fry pan, etc and knocks out a circuit breaker. But as I said some states/counties/municipalities allow it.

I would check the switch first. Get a handheld meter, remove the plate and the screws holding the switch. Pull the switch out enough to expose the wires (or the 2 screws on the side of the switch in case the electrician just pushed the wires into the quick-connect holes of the switch), set the handheld meter for A/C and the proper voltage and test by putting one lead on the ground wire (uninsulated...should be connected to the green colored screw on the switch but may just be sitting idle in the switch box) and the other lead to the screws on the side of the switch...important to mention you don't need to turn the switch on to test it. You should see A/C current from one of those screws when it is connected to ground. If you don't, it means you've lost power before that switch or possibly (and this would not have passed any code requirement I've ever seen), the contractor wired your switch through the neutral wire. If you've lost power before the switch, check (using a plug-in table lamp) all the plugs on that side of the house. If you start finding bad ones, check each one by removing the plate, removing the screws, pulling the switch out and looking at both the switch and the wires leading to it. Are they fried looking? Does it look like they've gotten too hot? Are any loose or broken? Be careful and don't touch any loose or broken wires. You'll get a shock. And don't let them touch the white wires. Black, red or blue wires will be "hot". White wires will be neutral...unless you are checking a 2-way switch. Those will be wired differently if the electrical contractor was too cheap or lazy to buy the proper wire. If you have aluminum wire, this can be a problem (as somebody already mentioned). Aluminum wiring gets loose and here is how: it expands like crazy when hot and contracts when cool and this big/small action causes the screws over time to loosen a bit or the push-in connections to simply fail from arcing. Common solution was to "pig-tail" copper wire to the aluminum wire (using any of three or four types of connectors), and this helps but copper and aluminum when joined with electricity can oxidize and that can also cause problems...worse in humid environments. My guess is you have some lights and some outlets on the same run (electrical run) and one of your plug receptacles has failed or has lost connection. That will cause everything downstream from it to stop working. The only trick is to find it. If that isn't the case and if you have aluminum wiring which has been pigtailed with copper, then one of your pigtail connections may have failed. You will see black usually on the wiring insulation or the pigtail connector (which could be a simple twist-on piece). Look closely on the hot wires...remember they'll be black (usually).


Jon

1952 1/2 ton with 1959 235
T5 with 3.07 rear end
Re: Any home electrician out there????
WE b OLD #1373655 Sun Aug 16 2020 09:29 PM
Joined: Feb 2001
Posts: 6,845
W
Master Gabster
It is copper wiring throughout. There is a bare ground wire cut short and not touching anything. . It just seems to be the 2 spare bedrooms the master bedroom and the hall. The electrician sent me a text that he will not be here until Wed noon. No problem for me. I do have lights in the master bedroom because it is wired up to the Bathrooms. The strange thing is the master bath is right behind the switch that controls the south end of the house but not the other bathroom. The bare copper wire in the switch box is very short. Oh well, Thanks all, I will just wait until he comes back. Jon, I think you maybe have hit it on the head. Just before this happened I was moving some nightlights around the bedrooms.


Ron, The Computer Greek
I love therefore I am.

1960 MGA Roadster Sold 7/18/2017
1954 3100 Chevy truck in the Gallery
2017 Buick Encore
Pix on Photobucket
Re: Any home electrician out there????
WE b OLD #1373669 Sun Aug 16 2020 10:28 PM
Joined: Mar 2014
Posts: 1,645
J
Shop Shark
Ron it is very common to see a short bare copper wire in the box (any box). That just tells us the electrician didn't bother to hook up the ground connection. And in fairness, some electricians will not do this on a switch. Like everything else you will hear pros and cons as to whether you need switches grounded, and my experience has been the electricians usually will stick up for each other rather than say anything bad about somebody else's work. Usually they'll ground plugs, though. Since around 1970, anyhow. The problem could also be a failed plug receptacle. We changed to the newer style switches and receptacles a few years ago (the stylish rectangular ones) and my wife's hair dryer within 6 months had caused a plug to internally fail. I replaced it and got her a dryer which uses less amperage and all has been well since, but the new receptacles just aren't as well made as the older ones unless you pay a lot more for some very heavy duty ones. Good luck.


Jon

1952 1/2 ton with 1959 235
T5 with 3.07 rear end
Re: Any home electrician out there????
WE b OLD #1373676 Sun Aug 16 2020 10:52 PM
Joined: Feb 2001
Posts: 6,845
W
Master Gabster
thumbs_up


Ron, The Computer Greek
I love therefore I am.

1960 MGA Roadster Sold 7/18/2017
1954 3100 Chevy truck in the Gallery
2017 Buick Encore
Pix on Photobucket
Re: Any home electrician out there????
WE b OLD #1374189 Thu Aug 20 2020 08:42 PM
Joined: Feb 2001
Posts: 6,845
W
Master Gabster
Update on my electrical problem. The electrician as never shown up and when I called he said he was very sick and waiting for the results of his COVID test. dang nono


Ron, The Computer Greek
I love therefore I am.

1960 MGA Roadster Sold 7/18/2017
1954 3100 Chevy truck in the Gallery
2017 Buick Encore
Pix on Photobucket
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