The Stovebolt Page Forums Home | FAQ | Forum | Swap Meet | Gallery | Tech Tips | Events | Features | Search | Hoo-Ya Shop
Helping out ...


EVENTS

Check in for status!

Jump over to the Events Forum, to post events -- new ones or the ones we have been enjoying for some time.
Look to see what's been cancelled or postponed.

Encourage one another!

Stovebolt Site Search
 
Old Truck Calendars
Months of truck photos!
Nothing like an old truck calendar

Stovebolt Calendars

Check for details!


Who's Online Now
3 members (Organbuilder, Retired71Blazer, tclederman), 172 guests, and 1 robot.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Forum Statistics
Forums50
Topics119,951
Posts960,604
Members43,521
Most Online1,229
Jan 21st, 2020
Image Posting Policy
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Page 1 of 3 1 2 3
Filling in firewall
#1368485 Fri Jul 10 2020 12:02 PM
Joined: Sep 2019
Posts: 158
R
Shop Shark
Short of replacing the firewall on an AD truck with a "smoothie", what have some of you other bolters done to close or cover the shotgun blast firewall?

Re: Filling in firewall
Rocket man #1368553 Fri Jul 10 2020 06:59 PM
Joined: Mar 2010
Posts: 903
Y
yar Offline
Shop Shark
Hello Rocky. Happy Friday.

When I restored my '36 Chevy PU in the early 1970s I counted over 50 holes in the firewall. They varied in size from sheet metal screw size to big ones left by others who passed heater hoses through the firewall and mounted a brake master cylinder and other objects long removed before I got the '36.

I regard substances like bondo and fiber glass as crutches that cover body damage, not actual repairs of body damage. So I repaired my firewall by filling small holes under about 1/4" with oxy-acetylene welding rod deposits and welding patches into the larger holes, also with oxy-acetylene. The attached photos show what the results look like 45 years later.

Only very simple tools were required, an oxy-acetylene welding torch. a body repair hammer, flat dolly and slapping file, a sanding disc on an angle grinder and some scrap sheet metal. This is why I've suggested to you in the past that welding is an essential skill in vehicle restoration and/or fabrication. After all the non-original holes were repaired and the welds ground smooth the heat-induced warping was corrected by shrinking metal in warped areas to eliminate the local "oil can" swelling of the metal.

Ray W

Attached Files
DSCN9563.JPG (182.41 KB, 160 downloads)
DSCN9564.JPG (201.23 KB, 159 downloads)
Last edited by yar; Fri Jul 10 2020 10:58 PM.

Ray
Re: Filling in firewall
Rocket man #1368591 Fri Jul 10 2020 11:06 PM
Joined: Nov 2018
Posts: 91
C
Shop Shark
Rocket Man - like Ray W, I chose to weld/patch the numerous holes. Speedway Motors, Paul Horton's Welder Series, and others sell the correct gauge, various diameter circle patch plug kits, or unholes as they also call them. I plug welded holes smaller than 1/4" and welded in the unholes for those 1/4" and above. I never counted all the holes, but there definitely was a lot, but being retired, I was in no hurry. Good luck!

Attached Files
June 29 2019 (1).jpg (170.02 KB, 151 downloads)
June 29 2019 (2).jpg (178.91 KB, 150 downloads)
July 5 2019 (2).JPG (269.07 KB, 145 downloads)

Charlie

'51 3100 5-Window (Restomod in progress)
Re: Filling in firewall
Rocket man #1368606 Sat Jul 11 2020 12:24 AM
Joined: Mar 2010
Posts: 9,295
5
Master Gabster
I guess I'm a kook. I like to keep all of the unused holes in place whether I am building a truck as it came, or modernizing it significantly. I use adhesive backed heat/sound deadener on the inside to cover all of the unused holes. I do this after the fire wall has been painted. This is how they were done on the assembly line, and I like that look.

Re: Filling in firewall
Rocket man #1368639 Sat Jul 11 2020 04:18 AM
Joined: Sep 2019
Posts: 158
R
Shop Shark
Ray and Clarsen3100...I kept my dad's oxy-acetylene welder when he moved into a nursing home. What rod did you use or was it just wire? I assume a small tip...just like brazing? Clarsen3100...did your vehicle ever get over the measles?
I'll check with Speedway for the unholes...I have them on speed dial!

Re: Filling in firewall
Rocket man #1368640 Sat Jul 11 2020 04:31 AM
Joined: Sep 2019
Posts: 158
R
Shop Shark
What gauge is the firewall on a '50 3100?

Re: Filling in firewall
Rocket man #1368642 Sat Jul 11 2020 06:03 AM
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 2,477
K
Housekeeping (Moderator) Making a Stovebolt Bed & Paint and Body Shop Forums
Originally Posted by Rocket man
What gauge is the firewall on a '50 3100?
Should be 18 or 19 gauge. 19 gauge isn't readily available as sheet metal stock, but 18 gauge is, slightly thicker.
If you're doing any other patching, just buy a larger piece and cut your plugs out of that.
Use a '0' tip on your OA torch and buy some real welding rod 1/16 inch diameter. People have used coat hangers or bailing wire, but there's no QC on those.
[on edit] Just measured mine. 0.052" including primer on both sides. 18 gauge is 0.048"
Also, some of the holes are oval, not round, so you'd have to cut your own patches anyway.

Last edited by klhansen; Sat Jul 11 2020 06:16 AM.

Kevin
First car '29 Ford Special Coupe
#2 - '29 Ford pickup restored from the ground up.
Newest Project - 51 Chevy 3100 work truck. Photos [flickr.com]
Busting rust since the mid-60's
Re: Filling in firewall
Rocket man #1368683 Sat Jul 11 2020 04:35 PM
Joined: Mar 2010
Posts: 903
Y
yar Offline
Shop Shark
"Ray and Clarsen3100...I kept my dad's oxy-acetylene welder when he moved into a nursing home. What rod did you use or was it just wire? I assume a small tip...just like brazing?"

Good morning Rocky.

In 1967 when I was a college kid I had a summer job welding headers at Doug's Headers, now known as Doug Thorley Headers. There I got to see the equipment and techniques the pros use. This is the style torch handle they use:

https://store.cyberweld.com/vitohaj28lid.html

It is small and light weight so you can weld all day without any strain, and importantly for body work, the knobs are at the top, not the bottom. That makes it easy to turn off the torch instantly with one hand when doing things like metal shrinking that requires putting down the torch and picking up the shrinking tools while the metal is still red hot. Even though this torch handle is small it takes a wide range of tips as well as a cutting attachment. I have tips down to size 000 but as I recall I used tip 00 for welding on body panels. That's not a reliable recollection because that work was done so long ago, about 50 years.

Most oxy-acetylene welding rigs have big, bulky "manly man" torch handles with the knobs at the bottom, near where the hoses connect. That heavy construction is strictly for appearance and would give a welder a pretty sore wrist if it were used continuously for an 8 hour shift.

If you're going to weld on your vehicle body panels I'd suggest practicing on scraps first until you have total control over the weld puddle and can add rod seamlessly. That comes with practice, especially on vertical surfaces. That 3500 degree F flame can do a lot of damage in a big hurry if you don't have it totally under control.

I know some people weld with stuff like coat hangers but actual welding rods are inexpensive and available in a variety if sizes. For body panels and exhaust tubing I use 1/16".

Have fun!

Ray W


Ray
Re: Filling in firewall
52Carl #1368711 Sat Jul 11 2020 08:03 PM
Joined: Sep 2001
Posts: 30,131
ace skiver
Originally Posted by 52Carl
I guess I'm a kook. I like to keep all of the unused holes in place whether I am building a truck as it came, or modernizing it significantly. I use adhesive backed heat/sound deadener on the inside to cover all of the unused holes. I do this after the fire wall has been painted. This is how they were done on the assembly line, and I like that look.

I belong to these same “kook klub”. Carl

Those unused holes allow us to discuss “what went there”.


Tim
1954Advance-Design.com [1954advance-design.com]
1954 3106 Carryall Suburban [stovebolt.com] - part of the family for 49 years
1954 3104 5-window pickup w/Hydra-Matic [1954advance-design.com] - part of the family for 15 years
- If you have to stomp on your foot-pedal starter, either you, or your starter, or your engine, has a problem.
- The 216 and early 235 engines are not "splash oilers" - this is a splash oiler. [chevy.oldcarmanualproject.com]
Re: Filling in firewall
Rocket man #1368716 Sat Jul 11 2020 08:58 PM
Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 2,924
"Hey! I sound like Darth Vader!!
Me three!

Page 1 of 3 1 2 3

Moderated by  HandyAndy, klhansen 

Link Copied to Clipboard
Home | FAQ | Forum | Swap Meet | Gallery | Tech Tips | Events | Features | Search | Hoo-Ya Shop
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.4