Hello everyone, welcome to The Engine Shop area of Stovebolt.com

We are here to have fun with old Chevy/GMC trucks and help people keep them running by sharing knowledge about troubleshooting problems and fixing engines up.

Your current Moderator(s) are: Woogeroo

The Engine Shop is the area for: The place to discuss engine items, rebuilding, updating, swapping engines.

It is also the area for discussing stock engines as well as the mostly stock setups and assorted bits and pieces. The modification, "go faster stuff" for engines is generally in The Hi-Po Shop, though of course there is always some overlap back and forth from time to time between the two areas.

Stovebolt.com as a whole is a resource and forum for pre-1973 Chevrolet/GMC Trucks and their associated bits, parts and issues in keeping them running, maintained, rebuilt and/or restored.

NOTE of Interest: The Engine Shop forum was originally called The Engine & Driveline Shop, so buried back in the old posts and threads in this forum are posts about transmissions and rear ends, etc.. Lots of golden nuggets of information in those old threads about the Driveline components. The Driveline was spun off into it's own forum in early 2005, so there are informative threads before that time relating to drive line issues here in the Engine Shop. I mention this here so you will know to search here in the Engine shop, before that time for some good information.

Be sure to peruse the Tech Tips area of Stovebolt.com, scroll down to the Engine section for how to articles about many things relating to engines.

The best way to get a response to your question/topic, is to write a good and clear question/topic! Stovebolt.com covers many decades of old Chevy/GMC trucks, so if you are asking a question about an engine, the type might get someone's attention. The year will help out as well, if you know it. The topic is the sentence in the forum that everyone will see when you go to make a new post.

"When starting a new thread/topic, be sure to state the make, year, series/model of truck, and any modifications (if they affect the question/topic)."


a few examples:

GMC 228 / shows it's a GMC and the cubic inch of the engine, so the people who have worked on GMCs and 228s will weigh in

1957 235 / shows the year and the cubic inch of the engine, also, changes were made in the 1950s to the engines, that may be relevant

1965 283 fuel pump / shows the year and the cubic inch, which in this case also means it's a v8, they have a question about the fuel pump

1959 distributor / year of truck and engine if it's the same, plus you have a question about the distributor specifically


Some of the members of Stovebolt.com are retired mechanics and thus have a lot of experience with many years of trucks and engine types. The rest of us have limited experience based on the few old trucks we have actually wrenched on and researched. Writing a good topic will get the attention of the people who have knowledge about your question.

The Founders and Owners of Stovebolt.com are aware that a lot of parts in the drive line in our old trucks interchange with the Chevy cars of similar eras. Some of the Stovebolt Members have old Chevy cars and trucks, so when a question of how to fix these interchangeable parts and components occurs, as long as it stays on topic; no harm, no foul. However, occasionally someone wants to start a whole thread on their car project, but cars are not why we are here. So if you have questions about your Chevy cars driveline and parts, please stay on topic and someone will try to help you out. If you wander off topic or try to start a thread about your whole car project, your post may be moved to the Greasy Spoon the first time or two and merely deleted thereafter.

If you see a post that needs to be reported because of spam, way off topic, people behaving badly; the way to do that has been changed by the folks who do create the software that the forums run on. Below is a screenshot showing the steps to take, if needed:

[img]https://www.stovebolt.com/ubbthreads/ubbthreads.php/ubb/download/Number/17293/filename/combined.jpg[/img]
(click on the link ^^^^ to see the image)


If you are looking for engine parts or have engine parts to sell, visit the Swap Meet here on Stovebolt.com. That is the classifieds area of our forum where all sorts of parts are listed. Do not make "parts for sale" or "parts wanted" posts here in the Engine Shop, they will be moved or deleted.


If you are curious about the back story and history of the Stovebolt page, go read about it, here.

If you would like to contribute financially to the Stovebolt page, please visit here to find out how to donate.

If you are new to the Stovebolt page, please visit the Welcome Centre and introduce yourself and your project.

To learn how to do a better search within the forum, please read:
how to search the stovebolt page forums - .pdf file by down2sea.

Adobe Reader - free program for reading .PDF files. [get.adobe.com]


If you need more help with car specific Chevy stuff or even newer Chevy truck stuff, we recommend:


ChevyTalk [chevytalk.org] - the place to discuss anything and everything Chevy, old or new, cars or trucks, or just the Chevy engines, if it's a Chevy, this is the place:


The Vintage Chevrolet Club of America [vccachat.org], is an actual car club for the preservation of old Chevy cars and Trucks, tho' mostly they seem to focus on cars. They do have a friendly section on their forum for trucks, but it is small and nowhere as comprehensive as the 'bolt here. Good place to find out information about specific parts and pieces.


Inliners International [inlinersinternational.org] - devoted to all Inline Engines, all makes, all years. Friendly & knowledgeable folks there on the forum.


Antique Automobile Club of America [aaca.org] is an actual car club for all makes and models of antique vehicles.


We hope you enjoy your time here in the Engine Shop learning and sharing information to keep all of our old rigs running.

-Woogeroo, your friendly Engine Shop Moderator.

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Originally written by Woogeroo, April 2020 (Happy Quarantine)