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#1351971 Fri Mar 27 2020 07:52 PM
Joined: Jun 2019
Posts: 31
G
Geo55 Offline OP
'Bolter
After trying 2 different gaskets and sealer with one, I still couldn't eliminate the spitting sound and stumble at idle I got with an exhaust leak between the head and intake/exhaust manifold. Decided to try one more time and use a Remflex gasket this time. I did notice that the gasket surfaces on the head were pitted badly in spots. Can anyone advise me on whether I should use any kind of sealer on this gasket? 53 Chevy truck with 216 George

Geo55 #1351975 Fri Mar 27 2020 08:35 PM
Joined: Feb 2004
Posts: 24,733
H
Kettle Custodian (pot stirrer)
In 60+ years of doing professional mechanic work, I've never been able to find a sealer that will stand up to exhaust gas temperature. Now, in about 3-2-1 seconds, somebody who has read three copies of Hot Rod Magazine and found at least five internet references will tell you I don't know what I'm talking about. It's up to you to choose who to believe. The only cure for pitted gasket surfaces is a milling machine and a fly cutter.
Jerry


"Freedom's just another word for nothing left to lose"
Kris Kristofferson

Cringe and wail in fear, Eloi- - - - -we Morlocks are on the hunt!

There is nothing noble in being superior to your fellow man; true nobility is being superior to your former self.
Ernest Hemingway

WAG MORE- - - - - -BARK LESS!
Geo55 #1352159 Sat Mar 28 2020 10:48 PM
Joined: Oct 2006
Posts: 1,851
B
Shop Shark
I agree with Jerry, but if you were to get a gasket to take up the pitting it would be the remflex, however no guarantees.

Geo55 #1352163 Sat Mar 28 2020 11:53 PM
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 5,615
Housekeeping (Moderator) Making a Stovebolt Bed & Paint and Body Shop Forums
Weren't exhaust manifold gaskets back in the old days made out of asbestos? (OMG, did I actually say that word? eeeek)
They probably had enough resiliency to seal without any sealant, which like Jerry says, can't stand the heat. Even JB weld won't work above about 250F.


Kevin
Newest Project - 51 Chevy 3100 work truck. Photos [flickr.com]
#2 - '29 Ford pickup restored from the ground up.
First car '29 Ford Special Coupe
Busting rust since the mid-60's
klhansen #1352170 Sun Mar 29 2020 12:54 AM
Joined: Sep 2001
Posts: 31,610
Bubba - Curmudgeon
J-B Weld can withstand a constant temperature of 500 °F (260 °C), [en.wikipedia.org] and the maximum temperature threshold is approximately 600 °F (316 °C) for 10 minutes.[9]


Tim
1954Advance-Design.com [1954advance-design.com]
1954 3106 Carryall Suburban [stovebolt.com] - part of the family for 49 years
1954 3104 5-window pickup w/Hydra-Matic [1954advance-design.com] - part of the family for 15 years
- If you have to stomp on your foot-pedal starter, either you, or your starter, or your engine, has a problem.
- The 216 and early 235 engines are not "splash oilers" - this is a splash oiler. [chevy.oldcarmanualproject.com]
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 5,615
Housekeeping (Moderator) Making a Stovebolt Bed & Paint and Body Shop Forums
Originally Posted by tclederman
J-B Weld can withstand a constant temperature of 500 °F (260 °C), [en.wikipedia.org] and the maximum temperature threshold is approximately 600 °F (316 °C) for 10 minutes.[9]
OK, but still not high enough for exhaust temps. ohwell

From J-B Weld's Site [jbweld.com]

Will J-B Weld work on an automotive exhaust?

Because of the extreme temperatures of exhaust systems, we do not recommend J-B Weld for use on exhaust manifolds and catalytic converters. Nor do we recommend the product for repairs within the combustion chamber. However, in areas where the continuous temperature is less than 450º F, we do recommend our HighHeat epoxy putty stick.


Kevin
Newest Project - 51 Chevy 3100 work truck. Photos [flickr.com]
#2 - '29 Ford pickup restored from the ground up.
First car '29 Ford Special Coupe
Busting rust since the mid-60's
Geo55 #1352176 Sun Mar 29 2020 01:29 AM
Joined: Feb 2004
Posts: 24,733
H
Kettle Custodian (pot stirrer)
I've seen exhaust port temperatures in the neighborhood of 2000 degrees F. on dyno runs of race engines at full throttle. The headers were translucent enough we could flames dancing arouind inside the pipes!
Jerry


"Freedom's just another word for nothing left to lose"
Kris Kristofferson

Cringe and wail in fear, Eloi- - - - -we Morlocks are on the hunt!

There is nothing noble in being superior to your fellow man; true nobility is being superior to your former self.
Ernest Hemingway

WAG MORE- - - - - -BARK LESS!
Geo55 #1352177 Sun Mar 29 2020 01:33 AM
Joined: Sep 2001
Posts: 31,610
Bubba - Curmudgeon
The is the Engine Shop not the HiPo Shop.

Would normal Stovebolt engines have those 2000 degrees temperatures?


Tim
1954Advance-Design.com [1954advance-design.com]
1954 3106 Carryall Suburban [stovebolt.com] - part of the family for 49 years
1954 3104 5-window pickup w/Hydra-Matic [1954advance-design.com] - part of the family for 15 years
- If you have to stomp on your foot-pedal starter, either you, or your starter, or your engine, has a problem.
- The 216 and early 235 engines are not "splash oilers" - this is a splash oiler. [chevy.oldcarmanualproject.com]
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 5,615
Housekeeping (Moderator) Making a Stovebolt Bed & Paint and Body Shop Forums
Originally Posted by tclederman
The is the Engine Shop not the HiPo Shop.

Would normal Stovebolt engines have those 2000 degrees temperatures?
Probably would on heavy load. My Diesel runs around 300F at idle, and will hit 1200F. The pyrometer is at the outlet of the exhaust manifold. Gas engines typically run hotter than diesels. We had a Model A exhaust manifold cherry red once when the timing was too retarded.

Last edited by klhansen; Sun Mar 29 2020 01:37 AM.

Kevin
Newest Project - 51 Chevy 3100 work truck. Photos [flickr.com]
#2 - '29 Ford pickup restored from the ground up.
First car '29 Ford Special Coupe
Busting rust since the mid-60's
Geo55 #1352182 Sun Mar 29 2020 01:48 AM
Joined: Feb 2004
Posts: 24,733
H
Kettle Custodian (pot stirrer)
Watch the exhaust manifolds on a 454 Chevy engine in a motorhome on a long uphill pull. They get red hot, and those are cast iron, not thinwall steel tubing. That's well over 1000 degrees, probably closer to 1500. I've made several test runs with different motorhomes with the engine cover off, trying to diagnose detonation noises that were causing cracked spark plug insulators and burned valves. A stovebolt engine will probably do something similar pulling a hill at close to maximum gross weight. A Cowboy Cadillac that never does anything more stressful than hauling an iced-down Yeti cooler full of beer to a tailgate party, not so much!
Jerry


"Freedom's just another word for nothing left to lose"
Kris Kristofferson

Cringe and wail in fear, Eloi- - - - -we Morlocks are on the hunt!

There is nothing noble in being superior to your fellow man; true nobility is being superior to your former self.
Ernest Hemingway

WAG MORE- - - - - -BARK LESS!
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