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Getting back to business
First round of holidays is about over. A few weeks before the next ones. For some of us...

Winter is Coming
Time to think about wintering your Bolt.
(continued)

A good Tech Tip
WINTERIZING YOUR TRUCK
including a link back to the Forums for some new thoughts.

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#1346890 Mon Feb 17 2020 08:47 PM
Joined: Jul 2009
Posts: 370
5
'Bolter
Getting ready to change the oil on my 235 and with all the new stuff out there was wondering what everyone is using. its not driven much but I like to see some oil pressure at idle

59chevy36 #1346895 Mon Feb 17 2020 08:55 PM
Joined: Apr 2005
Posts: 11,310
Grease Monkey, Moderator General Truck Talk & Greasy Spoon and HiPo Forum
No synthetic.


Martin
'62 Chevy C-10 Stepside Shortbed (Restomod in progress)
'47 Chevy 3100 5 Window (long term project)
‘65 Chevy Biscayne 4dr 230 I-6 one owner (I’m #2) “Emily”
‘39 Dodge Businessmans Coupe “Clarence”



"I fought the law and the law won" now I are a retired one!
Support those brave men/women who stand the "Thin Blue Line"! Hug a cop!
USAF 1965-1969 Weather Observation Tech (I got paid to look at the clouds)

59chevy36 #1346903 Mon Feb 17 2020 09:47 PM
Joined: Dec 2017
Posts: 1,183
D
'Bolter
I have been using Brand Penn 10W30 (now called Penn Grade One) for 7 or 8 years now. Real Pennsylvania crude oil base, clings to the parts, especially the rockers over the winter, has a zinc package and a wear package compatible with our old motors, and seems to hold better pressure then the Pennzoil I use to use, at least from what I have experienced.

Last edited by Dragsix; Mon Feb 17 2020 09:47 PM.

Mike
59chevy36 #1346906 Mon Feb 17 2020 10:24 PM
Joined: Mar 2014
Posts: 3,147
J
'Bolter
Valvoline VR-1 30 weight is what I use. You won't have winter weather to worry about in S. Florida, so 30 weight should be your friend. VR-1 also has extra zinc and holds pressure well in hot climates.


Jon

1952 1/2 ton with 1959 235
T5 with 3.07 rear end
59chevy36 #1346934 Tue Feb 18 2020 01:52 AM
Joined: Nov 2014
Posts: 80
E
'Bolter
I use Delo 30w, any of the diesel oils still have enough zinc in them to protect the cam and lifters.


ESum
59chevy36 #1347406 Sat Feb 22 2020 02:18 AM
Joined: Jul 2009
Posts: 370
5
'Bolter
Thanks for the input. Think I will go with the VR1 oil, like the zinc additive. But it looks to be hard to find in a 30 wt wonderif 10w30 would be ok. and yes we have had a light winter here still haven't put on the tire chains

59chevy36 #1347417 Sat Feb 22 2020 03:03 AM
Joined: Oct 2006
Posts: 1,851
B
Shop Shark
The VR-1 if it is truly a RACING oil, it won't have detergent, and yes 10w-30 is fine, I can't even believe anyone uses a straight weight oil, even Caterpillar has relented. And if you have a tight engine that doesn't leak a lot of oil, synthetic is more than fine, it is by far a superior lubricant.

brokenhead #1347459 Sat Feb 22 2020 01:57 PM
Joined: Oct 2019
Posts: 332
W
'Bolter
Originally Posted by brokenhead
And if you have a tight engine that doesn't leak a lot of oil, synthetic is more than fine, it is by far a superior lubricant.


Is this a reflection on the viscosity of synthetic or the cost of it?

Thanks


Kevin
1965 Chevy C10 Longbed Fleetside
(Engine needed, originally 230)
59chevy36 #1347461 Sat Feb 22 2020 02:22 PM
Joined: Dec 2008
Posts: 1,785
P
'Bolter
The viscosity is not an index of load capacity, film strength, "slippery-ness", or bearing protection.
It's the thickness: how much can pass through a sized orifice per second at a given temperature. Paint, molten metal, and maple syrup may have the same viscosity.

59chevy36 #1347501 Sat Feb 22 2020 06:48 PM
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 6,264
Housekeeping (Moderator) Making a Stovebolt Bed & Paint and Body Shop Forums
Yep that's true.
Water works for bearings, but it can't stand the heat in an engine. In fact there are circulating pumps for heating systems that are lubricated by the pumped water.


Kevin
Newest Project - 51 Chevy 3100 work truck. Photos [flickr.com]
#2 - '29 Ford pickup restored from the ground up.
First car '29 Ford Special Coupe
Busting rust since the mid-60's
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