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#1345939 Tue Feb 11 2020 01:27 PM
Joined: Sep 2019
Posts: 221
R
'Bolter
What method have you used for cutting the bed sides to allow for wider wheels and tires? I'm assuming a jig saw? I don't want the bed sides to look "hacked up"...nice symmetrical arches if you will.

Rocket man #1346066 Wed Feb 12 2020 02:03 AM
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 5,464
Housekeeping (Moderator) Making a Stovebolt Bed & Paint and Body Shop Forums
I've got a sheet metal nibbler attachment for a drill motor. A guy could set up a jig to guide it in a perfect circle arc. That might do the job for you. It cost me all of $25 and is two ended, so when the first side wears out, just swap to the other end and keep on going. You'd generate quite a pile of little sheet metal crescents with it for sure. Or a jig saw with a similar guide would do the trick.

This one comes with accessories for a bit more money. Amazon link


Kevin
Newest Project - 51 Chevy 3100 work truck. Photos [flickr.com]
#2 - '29 Ford pickup restored from the ground up.
First car '29 Ford Special Coupe
Busting rust since the mid-60's
Rocket man #1346069 Wed Feb 12 2020 02:32 AM
Joined: Jul 2011
Posts: 747
M
'Bolter
Pay attention to the part about 1/4" width...


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qAOQfUaRZyw



The above instructional video shows the same methods I used to cut a 15" hole in a car hood. After I cut the hole, I ran my pinched thumb and index finger around the perimeter of the cut hole to show someone in the shop that you can indeed cut sheet metal using snips without leaving all those "metal splinters". See here:


http://www.spiuserforum.com/index.php?threads/plymouth-arrow-hood.6922/



.

MPandC #1346073 Wed Feb 12 2020 03:15 AM
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 5,464
Housekeeping (Moderator) Making a Stovebolt Bed & Paint and Body Shop Forums
Originally Posted by MPandC
After I cut the hole, I ran my pinched thumb and index finger around the perimeter of the cut hole to show someone in the shop that you can indeed cut sheet metal using snips without leaving all those "metal splinters".

Robert, looking at Bill's aviation snip video (again, review is always good), I notice that he wasn't so fortunate, indicated by the bandage on his right index finger. wink

Anyway, my grip isn't what it used to be, and cutting a 16 gauge bedside with snips is a lot of work. That's why I recommended the nibbler. As Tim the tool man would say, "More Power" grin


Kevin
Newest Project - 51 Chevy 3100 work truck. Photos [flickr.com]
#2 - '29 Ford pickup restored from the ground up.
First car '29 Ford Special Coupe
Busting rust since the mid-60's
Rocket man #1346084 Wed Feb 12 2020 04:02 AM
Joined: Mar 2010
Posts: 10,105
5
'Bolter
Dude! You need to find a way to make it to Homecoming this year! We surely would appreciate every minute of what you have to say about your knowledge with metal working. I am 61 years old and am now embarrassed that I have never known how to use tin snips, having just now watched your video above.
Embarrassed is not a strong enough word. Ashamed isn't either. There must be a word the Germans use for this expression.

Rocket man #1346136 Wed Feb 12 2020 02:51 PM
Joined: Mar 2019
Posts: 1,379
G
'Bolter
Awesome video. Very informative. Thanks for sharing. Will help me and im sure many others in the future. thumbs_up

Rocket man #1346226 Wed Feb 12 2020 07:09 PM
Joined: Jul 2000
Posts: 1,500
G
Insomniac
I did a lot of work on the bed sides and front panel. For the long straight cuts, I took the sheets to the local HVAC contractor who charged me a nominal amount to make the cuts with the big shear. Rest of the cuts were made using saber saw with fine metal cutting blades. Cleaned up the cuts with file and sandpaper.


Gord
----
1954 1/2 ton 235 4 speed
Rocket man #1346532 Fri Feb 14 2020 08:31 PM
Joined: Nov 2008
Posts: 557
A
Shop Shark
personally, I'd avoid a jigsaw if at all possible. my experience is the blade walks around too much to make a smooth, consistent cut. Even the nibblers walk. but i think nibblers, plasma torch, or even a pneumatic cut-off wheel would be better than a jigsaw.. aviation snips may work if it isn't too thick, but man you will have popeye arms when its all done.

aggie jon #1346538 Fri Feb 14 2020 10:04 PM
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 5,464
Housekeeping (Moderator) Making a Stovebolt Bed & Paint and Body Shop Forums
Originally Posted by aggie jon
personally, I'd avoid a jigsaw if at all possible. my experience is the blade walks around too much to make a smooth, consistent cut. Even the nibblers walk. but i think nibblers, plasma torch, or even a pneumatic cut-off wheel would be better than a jigsaw.. aviation snips may work if it isn't too thick, but man you will have popeye arms when its all done.

I agree with most of what you said. But a nibbler would do a fine job if you want a perfect circle cut using a radius guide. Without a guide, the cut would be a bit uneven.
What I'd do is rough out the cut with a nibbler if a radius guide isn't available and go back in with aviation snips for cleanup to the final line. There's no way you could cut a 16 gauge bedside with aviation snips in one pass, because the waste has to be bent out of the way, and more than about 1/2" waste would be impossible to roll unless you're doing a straight cut, and even then I'd have my doubts. For straight cuts a jump shear or hiring it out for long cuts would be the way to go.
I agree about the popeye arms. grin
[on edit] That part that Robert said about the 1/4" waste (view Bill's how to video) is important. If you have more than that, go to something besides aviation snips.

Last edited by klhansen; Fri Feb 14 2020 10:14 PM.

Kevin
Newest Project - 51 Chevy 3100 work truck. Photos [flickr.com]
#2 - '29 Ford pickup restored from the ground up.
First car '29 Ford Special Coupe
Busting rust since the mid-60's

Moderated by  HandyAndy, klhansen 

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