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Bench Grinder #1332208 Fri Nov 01 2019 09:36 PM
Joined: Dec 2013
Posts: 714
HandyAndy Offline OP
Shop Shark
I've noticed that my bench grinder is getting a little weak with light pressure. It's a cheapo that lasted a lot longer than I would have expected. Anyone have a recommendation for a 6" or 8" bench grinder? Pedestal or bench top?

Thanks,


Andy

His: 1947 Chevrolet 3100
Hers: 2008 American Saddlebred

"A Jack of all trades is a master of none, but oftentimes better than a master of one." - Benjamin Franklin
Re: Bench Grinder [Re: HandyAndy] #1332214 Fri Nov 01 2019 10:09 PM
Joined: Feb 2017
Posts: 74
D
David C. Offline
Vintage Truck & Tractor
deWalt, I bought an 8 in a few years ago. It was expensive but well worth the money. I have an el cheapo that I abuse for hard coarse grinding. But any precision grinds or tool dressing I use the deWalt.

Last edited by David C.; Sat Nov 02 2019 03:45 AM.

Current project; 1961 C20, 235 I6
Re: Bench Grinder [Re: HandyAndy] #1332389 Sun Nov 03 2019 04:59 AM
Joined: Dec 2015
Posts: 2,025
69Cuda Offline
Big Bolt Forum Moderator
You might look for an older one at a garage sale. I have an old 6" craftsman and an 8" craftsman, both are running strong. The 6" is probably from the 60s


Mike

1955 Chevy 6400 ex-flatbed (no bed now!)
In the Stovebolt Gallery


1958 Chevy 6400 flatbed W/dump
In the Stovebolt Gallery

1959 Chevy Suburban Owned for almost 20 years, Daily Driver -- sold May 2016
In the Stovebolt Gallery

Sufficient unto the day is the evil thereof
Re: Bench Grinder [Re: HandyAndy] #1332456 Sun Nov 03 2019 08:58 PM
Joined: Feb 2004
Posts: 19,258
H
Hotrod Lincoln Offline
Boltergeist
I built a very versatile grinder/buffer from a set of 3/4" pillow blocks, a length of drill rod and a 3/4 HP electric motor. One end of the shaft is turned down to 1/2" diameter and threaded for 1/2-20 screw-on arbors for a wire wheel, and muslin or felt buffing wheels, while the other end has a 1/2" left-hand thread for attaching a grinding wheel. The motor has a 3-step pulley and a drive belt for spinning the shaft at different speeds. Turning the LH thread on my lathe was quite a learning experience! The whole works is mounted to a steel plate with a tripod leg arrangement for stability.
Jerry


The murder victim was drowned in a bathtub full of Rice Krispies and milk.
The coroner blamed the crime on a cereal killer!

Cringe and wail in fear, Eloi- - - - -we Morlocks are on the hunt!
Re: Bench Grinder [Re: HandyAndy] #1332487 Sun Nov 03 2019 11:46 PM
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 377
P
Phak1 Offline
Shop Shark
Jerry, here’s where I can attempt to teach the teacher. There’s two ways that I have turned left handed threads on a lathe. The first is to cut a relief where the thread ends, to the depth of thread. In other words, if the length of thread that you want is 2”, thats where the relief will be cut. I usually use a cutoff tool that has been radius’s or a tool bit thats ground similar. Then thread as usual starting at the relief with the carriage feed going away from the the head stock.

The second method is to turn the tool bit upside down, reverse the direction that the lathe is normally running, then thread as usual. This method is not the preferred way, because the force is trying to pull the tool up away from the holder and cross slide which goes against the way the lathe is designed. As long as you are only using it for small threads, it works really well.

If your expertise is beyond these methods, I humbly apologize for trying to teach the master and take my seat.


Last edited by Phak1; Mon Nov 04 2019 01:38 AM.

Phil

1952 Chevrolet 3100 w/‘59 235 & hydraulic lifters
“Three on the Tree” & 4:11 torque tube
12v w/ Alternator
Re: Bench Grinder [Re: HandyAndy] #1332520 Mon Nov 04 2019 02:37 AM
Joined: Feb 2004
Posts: 19,258
H
Hotrod Lincoln Offline
Boltergeist
I use the "thread from left to right method, with a square plunge cut a few thousandths deeper than the minor diameter of the desired thread to give the tool bit a starting point. I have used the inverted tool bit/reversed spindle method, but the lathe I'm currently using has a threaded-on chuck that's not too friendly about cutting threads with the spindle running backwards- - - -it tries to unscrew the chuck! With a pin-drive or key-drive chuck and a spanner nut on the spindle, that's not a problem. One really fun thread that I don't like to try to turn is for a 1903 Springfield rifle barrel- - - -it's a 10 TPI SQUARE thread, (Not ACME) with a thread depth of .050"! That leaves NO room for error whatsoever as it's machined- - - -the thread spacing and depth must be absolutely perfect if the barrel is going to fit the receiver properly! A Springfield also has a coned breech with a counterbore for the boltface to fit into, but very few gunsmiths, me included, try to duplicate that feature on a replacement barrel!

When I was teaching auto mechanics at a Tennessee state trade school, one of the projects the students across the hall in the machine shop were required to complete was a stainless steel shaft for a plumbing gate valve with a 1 1/4" diameter 8 TPI left hand ACME thread. They used the upside down tool bit, reversed spindle method to do that project. Quite a skill test, there!
Jerry



The murder victim was drowned in a bathtub full of Rice Krispies and milk.
The coroner blamed the crime on a cereal killer!

Cringe and wail in fear, Eloi- - - - -we Morlocks are on the hunt!
Re: Bench Grinder [Re: HandyAndy] #1332560 Mon Nov 04 2019 03:14 PM
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 377
P
Phak1 Offline
Shop Shark
My toughest job was turning double lead internal ACME threads for MOV’s (Motor Operated Valves), when the stem to try it on, was out in the field. The fit on MOV’s is critical to their operation, so you would err on the side of too tight, then put it back in the lathe and take another cut if required. We didn’t have collets that big, or 3-jaws chucks that ran that true, so all the work was done in 4-jaw’s. Indicating and and picking up your thread again was always fun. We had so many different valve’s, it wasn’t cost effective to buy ACME taps to finish them off.

Sticking on course with the OP’s, with grinders you get what you pay for. The cheaper it is the less power it will have and the more vibration you will get. Vibration is the Achilles heel for grinders as it shortens the bearings life. If you google for bench grinders, and check the ratings you will see that the biggest complaint is vibration. In some cases you can decrease the vibration by removing any imperfections on the shaft or on the supporting collars and finally, dressing the wheel. The better grinders have cast machined collars and the cheaper ones will be pressed steel.

If you can locate a used Baldor, buy it.

I have two recommendations for new both with 4 star ratings.

Shopfox
https://www.amazon.com/Shop-Fox-W18...er-hand-tools&sr=1-8#customerReviews

Jet
https://www.amazon.com/Jet-577128-G...880157&s=power-hand-tools&sr=1-3


Phil

1952 Chevrolet 3100 w/‘59 235 & hydraulic lifters
“Three on the Tree” & 4:11 torque tube
12v w/ Alternator
Re: Bench Grinder [Re: HandyAndy] #1332605 Tue Nov 05 2019 12:15 AM
Joined: Feb 2004
Posts: 19,258
H
Hotrod Lincoln Offline
Boltergeist
Speaking of grinders- -- - -I just bought a Storm-Vulcan Model 15 crankshaft grinder. I'll be setting it up with a 20" diameter 7/8" wide grinding wheel for changing the stroke on 235 and 261 stovebolt crankshafts, grinding an offset in the center of the connecting rod journals for a NASCAR tool steel connecting rod made by Carrillo. I'll be changing the stroke from 3 15/16" to 4 3/8", a total stroke increase of 7/16". That turns a 235 into a 266 cubic inch engine, and a 261 goes to almost 300. The engines will look totally original from the outside. I'm also working on an idea to turn a 216 into a 266, using full-pressure 235 components. It will also be a "sleeper"- - - -no outward modifications visible!

Balancing a grinding wheel that size is very critical to safety, and also for getting a good finish on the crankshaft journals.
Jerry


The murder victim was drowned in a bathtub full of Rice Krispies and milk.
The coroner blamed the crime on a cereal killer!

Cringe and wail in fear, Eloi- - - - -we Morlocks are on the hunt!
Re: Bench Grinder [Re: HandyAndy] #1332617 Tue Nov 05 2019 01:34 AM
Joined: Dec 2013
Posts: 714
HandyAndy Offline OP
Shop Shark
Gentlemen,

Thanks for your recommendations and input on the bench grinders. Hopefully, I can make an informed decision in the near future. I may even look to Craig's List, you just never know what you might find!

HRL and Phak1, I'm taking a basic machining course at the local community college. I'll have to ask my instructor about his technique on cutting left-handed threads.........LOL!

Thanks again,


Andy

His: 1947 Chevrolet 3100
Hers: 2008 American Saddlebred

"A Jack of all trades is a master of none, but oftentimes better than a master of one." - Benjamin Franklin
Re: Bench Grinder [Re: HandyAndy] #1332620 Tue Nov 05 2019 02:18 AM
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 3,823
2-Ton Offline
Shop Shark
Andy
Left handed threads are easy. You just start at the left and go right.

Phil, I have machined many double lead stem nuts.
You really have to keep your mind on your work and don't let the boss tell you how to do it.
Ever do a buttress thread?

I also agree on the Balder grinder. They are the best made.

Don


Of all the things I've lost in my life, I miss my mind the most!

1967 GMC 9500 Fire Ladder Truck
"The Flag Pole"
In the Stovebolt Gallery
More pix on Photobucket
'46 2-Ton grain truck
'48 3/4-ton grain truck
'50 2-ton flatbed
'54 Pontiac Straight Eight
'70 American LaFrance pumper fire truck.
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