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Measuring for shocks #1311421
Tue May 21 2019 05:32 PM
Tue May 21 2019 05:32 PM
Achipmunk  Offline OP
Extreme Gabster
Joined: Dec 2001
Posts: 14,643
Boiling Springs, S. C. 29316
Is there a "standard formula" for measuring for shock length.

The two mounting points are 14 1/2" apart. I know the shock has to be able to extend/compress so basically my question is "how much". I don't think there will be a problem with extending, but more of how much the shock should be "out" for compression.
Hope you understand the question....I know many of you have probably been through this exercise.

I'm listening, so educate me!.


1937 Chevy Pickup
1952 Chevy Panel
Pictures in my Photobucket
1950 Chevy Coupe

52 Chevy Panel

I'd rather walk and carry a Chevy hub cap than ride in a Ferd.
I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you smile
Re: Measuring for shocks [Re: Achipmunk] #1311428
Tue May 21 2019 06:44 PM
Tue May 21 2019 06:44 PM
H
Hotrod Lincoln  Online
Boltergeist
Joined: Feb 2004
Posts: 18,552
Dellrose, TN
The simplest way to determine minimum shock length would be to actually measure it. Loop a piece of chain over the frame and under a floor jack, hook or bolt it together, and start cranking on the jack until something bottoms out- - - -suspension snubbers, etc. Then measure the distance between the upper and lower shock mounting points and add an inch or so "fudge factor" so there's no way for the shock to hit a mechanical limit. That's how we did it on the round track race cars where there were no factory specifications available. If your shop happens to have chain anchors built into the floor, or the suspension can be assembled without a spring in place, it's a lot simpler.
Jerry


The murder victim was drowned in a bathtub full of Rice Krispies and milk.
The coroner blamed the crime on a cereal killer!

Cringe and wail in fear, Eloi- - - - -we Morlocks are on the hunt!
Re: Measuring for shocks [Re: Achipmunk] #1311434
Tue May 21 2019 08:30 PM
Tue May 21 2019 08:30 PM
K
klhansen  Offline
Shop Shark
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 1,175
Eagle River, Alaska
Actually all you need to do to measure actual suspension compression is to measure the space between the axle and the snubber. It's actually harder to determine how much to allow for shock extension, although you could do that buy jacking from the frame until the wheels come off the ground, and measure again between the axle and snubber. Subtract that from the measurement you took with the truck sitting on the wheels and that's the extension of the shock. As Jerry said, adding an inch or so in both directions would work.


Kevin
First car '29 Ford Special Coupe
#2 - '29 Ford pickup restored from the ground up.
Newest Project - 51 Chevy 3100 work truck. Photos
Re: Measuring for shocks [Re: Achipmunk] #1311440
Tue May 21 2019 09:19 PM
Tue May 21 2019 09:19 PM
J
Joe H  Offline
Shop Shark
Joined: Feb 2000
Posts: 3,932
Lee's Summit Mo. 64086
I was told, 2/3 of the travel for compression, 1/3 for extension. As said above, axle stop should hit before shock bottoms out. http://www.monroe.com/downloads/install-instructions-guides/MonroeMountingLengthSpecifications.pdf
At the bottom ( page 77 ) are the mounting codes.

Re: Measuring for shocks [Re: Achipmunk] #1311451
Tue May 21 2019 11:26 PM
Tue May 21 2019 11:26 PM
B
Bill Trotter  Offline
Shop Shark
Joined: Jan 2018
Posts: 229
Iron River Mi.
I measured my distance between mounting points with wheels off the ground and with wheels back on ground and called Monroe and they figured the correct shock for my 37 1/2 ton.

Re: Measuring for shocks [Re: Achipmunk] #1311463
Wed May 22 2019 01:28 AM
Wed May 22 2019 01:28 AM
Achipmunk  Offline OP
Extreme Gabster
Joined: Dec 2001
Posts: 14,643
Boiling Springs, S. C. 29316
Thank you guys. Reading this brings rattles my brain back to many years ago that I thought I had forgotten.
Stovebolters to the rescue!!


1937 Chevy Pickup
1952 Chevy Panel
Pictures in my Photobucket
1950 Chevy Coupe

52 Chevy Panel

I'd rather walk and carry a Chevy hub cap than ride in a Ferd.
I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you smile

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