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Re: Modern alignment tool? Any recommendations? [Re: Lugnutz] #1303548 Mon Mar 18 2019 11:45 AM
Joined: Sep 2011
Posts: 1,767
L
Lugnutz Offline OP
Shop Shark
4100,
The bend in the pointer rods allows me to keep the pointer tips up in the air, hands free, while adjusting the sliders. It’s a minor design idea. A perfectly straight rod would not be balanced and would want to fall flat. If my 6’ rod were heavier, as in your design, the pointers could be set vertically and be hands free. The reason for the long rod is so I can set the pointer at the line horizontal to the hub center no matter what size tire it is. Just move the base rod closer or further away from the tires.

Re: Modern alignment tool? Any recommendations? [Re: Lugnutz] #1303862 Wed Mar 20 2019 02:10 AM
Joined: Sep 2011
Posts: 1,767
L
Lugnutz Offline OP
Shop Shark
I've updated my web page to include Section 2 where I show how I use an iPhone to check wheel camber.
LINK HERE
Jay

Re: Modern alignment tool? Any recommendations? [Re: Lugnutz] #1303976 Thu Mar 21 2019 12:07 AM
Joined: Feb 2004
Posts: 18,689
H
Hotrod Lincoln Offline
Boltergeist
There are dozens of "made in China" magnetic caster/camber gauges available on Ebay for less than $20.00, and a few professional quality ones brand new for less than $100.00. Good "pre-owned" pro quality magnetic gauges are there, also. Any of those options are at least as accurate, if not more so, than a phone app. Now- - - -to measure caster, an accurate way of turning the wheel in and out exactly 20 degrees each way is going to be needed. A set of ball bearing turn plates is going to be a $300.00 or greater investment. An accurate angle move is needed because caster is actually a measurement of the change in camber as the wheel moves through an exact 40-degree arc, 20 in and 20 out.
Jerry


The murder victim was drowned in a bathtub full of Rice Krispies and milk.
The coroner blamed the crime on a cereal killer!

Cringe and wail in fear, Eloi- - - - -we Morlocks are on the hunt!
Re: Modern alignment tool? Any recommendations? [Re: Lugnutz] #1303986 Thu Mar 21 2019 01:17 AM
Joined: May 2005
Posts: 83
5
59 fleet Offline
Shop Shark
I have always determined toe-in as the measured difference between the front of the tires and the rear of the tires. Have I been doing it wrong?

Re: Modern alignment tool? Any recommendations? [Re: Lugnutz] #1303988 Thu Mar 21 2019 01:21 AM
Joined: Sep 2001
Posts: 28,084
tclederman Offline
Boltergeist


Tim
1954Advance-Design.com
1954 3106 Carryall Suburban - part of the family for 48 years
1954 3104 5-window pickup w/Hydra-Matic - part of the family for 14 years
Z-series (54/55) GMC 350 (2-ton) COE - now part of Dave's family
- If you have to stomp on your foot-pedal starter, either you, or your starter, or your engine, has a problem.
- The 216 and early 235 engine are not "splash oilers" - this is a splash oiler.
Re: Modern alignment tool? Any recommendations? [Re: 59 fleet] #1303993 Thu Mar 21 2019 01:41 AM
Joined: Sep 2011
Posts: 1,767
L
Lugnutz Offline OP
Shop Shark
Originally Posted by 59 fleet
I have always determined toe-in as the measured difference between the front of the tires and the rear of the tires. Have I been doing it wrong?


Here we have a perfect example of ME, thinking I might understand something, when I actually don’t know much at all.

The link shared by tclederman has me thinking that I’ve been wrong about how to calculate toe.
In the link he shared, it looks like I’ve explained it wrong on my website, which I’ll be happy to correct once I have a better understanding.
So for the sake of easy math and discussion, if the front side of the tires are 50” apart and the rear side of the tires are 51” apart, how much toe in does it have?

Last edited by Lugnutz; Thu Mar 21 2019 06:35 AM.
Re: Modern alignment tool? Any recommendations? [Re: Lugnutz] #1303998 Thu Mar 21 2019 02:03 AM
Joined: Feb 2004
Posts: 18,689
H
Hotrod Lincoln Offline
Boltergeist
"Pigeon-toed!" The most accurate way to measure toe is to scribe a line around the center of the tread and use a tram bar to measure the front and rear dimensions. Anything else, other than maybe a laser alignment machine, will give a somewhat inaccurate reading. Toe in or out of more than about 1/8" is way too much. Since the tires need to be running basically straight ahead while in motion, toe compensates for slight flexing of the steering system components between "on the road" and "at rest". Steering systems with the linkage behind the wheels tend to spread the wheels out while driving, so they usually get toed in somewhat while at rest. Steering systems like the early 1950's Fords with the tie rods ahead of the wheels usually got a slight amount of toe-out because they had a tendency for the wheels to pull toward each other while in motion.
Jerry


The murder victim was drowned in a bathtub full of Rice Krispies and milk.
The coroner blamed the crime on a cereal killer!

Cringe and wail in fear, Eloi- - - - -we Morlocks are on the hunt!
Re: Modern alignment tool? Any recommendations? [Re: Lugnutz] #1304042 Thu Mar 21 2019 02:06 PM
Joined: Sep 2011
Posts: 1,767
L
Lugnutz Offline OP
Shop Shark
So, I think the answer to my question above is 0.5” of toe. Correct?

Re: Modern alignment tool? Any recommendations? [Re: Lugnutz] #1304048 Thu Mar 21 2019 02:36 PM
Joined: Sep 2001
Posts: 28,084
tclederman Offline
Boltergeist
What year 4100?
Original front suspension?


Tim
1954Advance-Design.com
1954 3106 Carryall Suburban - part of the family for 48 years
1954 3104 5-window pickup w/Hydra-Matic - part of the family for 14 years
Z-series (54/55) GMC 350 (2-ton) COE - now part of Dave's family
- If you have to stomp on your foot-pedal starter, either you, or your starter, or your engine, has a problem.
- The 216 and early 235 engine are not "splash oilers" - this is a splash oiler.
Re: Modern alignment tool? Any recommendations? [Re: tclederman] #1304049 Thu Mar 21 2019 02:38 PM
Joined: Sep 2011
Posts: 1,767
L
Lugnutz Offline OP
Shop Shark
1965 C10 with IFS. Now I have another question. Why does it matter what year or model truck?

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