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Re: Stripped intake threads.
Matttttttttttttt #1287794 Sat Nov 17 2018 04:17 AM
Joined: May 2005
Posts: 7,535
B
General Purpose
I would take it off and I'm pretty good with tools and very mechanical. Have done a lot of work like that also. It's just I've learned when you only have one manifold, that's what you do. If you think you can hold a drill straight as a drill press, tap straight while leaning over, not drop anything down the hole.......do what Grigg says. Trying to advise with safety/risk vs reward in mind. (extra time to take off manifold vs better positioning of part, your body, tools. Thus avoiding a major malfunction). Considering an unknown experience level. Could be the wrong approach sometimes.



Watch out for careful drivers!!!
I'm away on an ego trip. Will be back on Feb 30.
I'm not an Auto Mechanic, but I play one on TV.
I charge $0.02 for every opinion and I take Paypal.
Plan B is always better than plan A, by definition.
You can't teach a new dog old tricks.


Re: Stripped intake threads.
Matttttttttttttt #1287799 Sat Nov 17 2018 05:12 AM
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 2,973
Housekeeping (Moderator) Making a Stovebolt Bed & Paint and Body Shop Forums
I've repaired quite a few stripped threads with helicoils, and I wouldn't hesitate to do it with it installed. Stuff a rag in the intake to keep stuff from falling into it and do the deed. I've even omitted the drilling and just used the helicoil tap when the threads were completely stripped away. It's not all that hard to run the tap in straight, as there's a pilot hole already there. And cast iron isn't that hard to tap, nearly as easy as aluminum.
I agree with bartamos though in that taking the manifold off would be the best (and safest) way to do it. It's not that much trouble to take it off, but it's not absolutely necessary.


Kevin
First car '29 Ford Special Coupe
#2 - '29 Ford pickup restored from the ground up.
Newest Project - 51 Chevy 3100 work truck. Photos [flickr.com]
Busting rust since the mid-60's
Re: Stripped intake threads.
Matttttttttttttt #1287850 Sat Nov 17 2018 04:30 PM
Joined: May 2005
Posts: 9,146
G
.
Removing the intake and exhaust manifold if not already necessary is asking for more work and possible troubles.
Even with the manifolds off and at the drill press it’s not an easy job to block, clamp, shim, adjust, and check before drilling. The manifolds aren’t flat on the bottom.

There are drill and tap guides available, or make your own temporary ones with a block of wood and a drill press.
https://www.shop.biggatortools.com/main.sc
With those to help drill and tap a somewhat less skilled person might get perfect results. In any case experience leads to skill, neither comes without trying new things.

Without those guides go slow and check drill and also tap for square at two points 90* apart with a small square, even a business card is a handy square.


1951 GMC 250 in the Project Journals [stovebolt.com]
1948 Chevrolet 6400 [stovebolt.com] - Detroit Diesel 4-53T - Roadranger 10 speed overdrive - 4 wheel disc brakes
1952 Chevrolet 3800 pickup [stovebolt.com]
---All pictures [picasaweb.google.com]---
"First, get a clear notion of what you desire to accomplish, and then in all probability you will succeed in doing it..." -Henry Maudslay-
Re: Stripped intake threads.
Matttttttttttttt #1287855 Sat Nov 17 2018 05:22 PM
Joined: May 2005
Posts: 7,535
B
General Purpose
Commentary not aimed at anyone;
One other thing, Don't strip threads. There is no excuse. When restoring, refurbishing or just repairing, you must inspect, size, clean and chase all internal and external threads. This is a big part of the work that needs to be done. I do it all the time. I have taps already loaded with 1/4-20, 5/16-18, 3/8-16. I either sandblast original hardware or wire wheel it clean and new and then chase if it won't past a test. Wire wheel is preferred. I have no fingerprints left. smile Everything goes together nicely with no hang ups. This part of mechanic work is often over looked....and again, for the beginner, don't strip threads. STOP if threads don't feel easy to tighten. Always thread hardware on by hand until well engaged. Never start a bolt or nut with a tool.
New hardware must be tested. Sometimes the tolerance/quality on the plating of Chinese hardware will not thread easily into original SAE threads. I have had to chase new hardware many times. That's why I save, tag and reuse 95% of the old hardware.

Note 1: You must be extremely careful when chasing captive/captive floating/no access hardware. Use liquid wrench, oil, etc. and slowly turn tap or die 1/2 turn and back off, then 1/2 more and etc. Be SURE you know the size and pitch. Obviously, if you break it loose from the weld or cage, you are the one who is screwed. Starting and using a tap or die, to chase threads, also needs special care. Don't strip threads that way either.

Note 2: Some of you guys tend to forget, everything is simple if you are already good at it. A novice or trainee needs to have the best chance for success. Then when they get "good at it" they can develop quicker methods. If they ever even do it again. Not speaking about Matttttttttt's abilities, just a general comment. If a person asks this kind of question, they could be a novice. Grigg is a Machinist/Fabricator, Kevin and I are Mechanical Engineers. We all love to work on old trucks and drive them. We need to help others and learn from others. We need to keep in mind not all are as experienced as we may be. I realize there are several different ways to accomplish a task. I learn on here everyday. I just give my opinion. The best way to get answers is to get various opinions, so a person can decide what is the best approach to do something. We are very good at that on Stovebolt and have done that for this member. Well done. I learn more by helping than the poster does.


Watch out for careful drivers!!!
I'm away on an ego trip. Will be back on Feb 30.
I'm not an Auto Mechanic, but I play one on TV.
I charge $0.02 for every opinion and I take Paypal.
Plan B is always better than plan A, by definition.
You can't teach a new dog old tricks.


Re: Stripped intake threads.
bartamos #1287866 Sat Nov 17 2018 07:45 PM
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 2,973
Housekeeping (Moderator) Making a Stovebolt Bed & Paint and Body Shop Forums
Originally Posted by bartamos
Commentary not aimed at anyone;
One other thing, Don't strip threads. There is no excuse.

We all get that, but we have no control over what someone else has done previously (remember these trucks are senior citizens wink and have likely been worked on by some hack a number of times). I've run across a number of threaded holes that are on a razor edge of being stripped already, and strip on the first turn of the wrench. At that point you need to break out the helicoil kit.

Excellent comments concerning chasing threads. If you reinstall a rusty, cruddy bolt in a rusty, cruddy hole, it's going to take some of the threads out. If you can't run them all the way in with your fingers, you either haven't cleaned them or you've cross-threaded them. Cross threading is a problem if someone else has already done that. Bolts have to be started STRAIGHT.


Kevin
First car '29 Ford Special Coupe
#2 - '29 Ford pickup restored from the ground up.
Newest Project - 51 Chevy 3100 work truck. Photos [flickr.com]
Busting rust since the mid-60's
Re: Stripped intake threads.
Matttttttttttttt #1287882 Sat Nov 17 2018 09:30 PM
Joined: Jun 2012
Posts: 1,729
S
Shop Shark
Thread chsing is not thread cutting. A tap or die will chase if need be. It will also cut all the threads off if you let it. I use a cut off wheel to make any bolt a thread chase type tool. That and a bit of grease will prvent chips from getting into the intake. Just watched a nice youtube video. A guy put a bolt and 2 nuts togethe. Drilled the junction on a drill press. Removed the nuts and has a tap like thread chser bolt and 2 thread chaser nuts(die) That is about as cheap and easy as can be. If the hole is in fact stripped. Then an insert is the way to fix it. Step type studs can be difficult to find and cost some too. The problem is different if you are fixing a side mounted intake(inline six) or a top mounted intake Most V-8. But if the issue is with the top mounted carb, then that is the same. One will need to drill or chase into Iron(the head) the other will need to drill/chse into aluminum(after market intake) or iron(Stock). It is different working on those 2 materials. Iron is easy to tap/ chase. Aluminum is a lot softer. Keep it straight and go slow.


Steve H
Re: Stripped intake threads.
Matttttttttttttt #1287885 Sat Nov 17 2018 09:53 PM
Joined: May 2005
Posts: 7,535
B
General Purpose
Thread "chasers" are snake oil. They are just screw threads with a big cleanout groove. Like when you make one from a bolt. I use taps and dies to cut thru rust and corrosion. It taps the same thread as the original tap that was used. If you can't do it, use a "chaser". They get stuck on crusty threads just the same as a bolt would. I'm not trying to clean off grease, I do that first with gas, blaster, WD40, carb cleaner, soap or wire wheel. A chaser is BS. A fake tool. Machinists I know use a tap and die to renew threads. I'm not talking about fixing stripped threads. I'm talking about restoration of an old truck. Mostly threads I cant sandblast or wire wheel.


Watch out for careful drivers!!!
I'm away on an ego trip. Will be back on Feb 30.
I'm not an Auto Mechanic, but I play one on TV.
I charge $0.02 for every opinion and I take Paypal.
Plan B is always better than plan A, by definition.
You can't teach a new dog old tricks.


Re: Stripped intake threads.
Matttttttttttttt #1287887 Sat Nov 17 2018 10:09 PM
Joined: Mar 2010
Posts: 926
Y
yar Offline
Shop Shark
Matt,

This type of product is way better than a helicoil:

http://www.repairengineering.com/keensert.html

I have used them to repair damaged threads in motorcycle engine castings, including spark plug threads. They do not unscrew like helicoils because they are locked in place by 4 keys. Other companies make very similar products. You are close to Industrial Pipe and Steel in South El Monte and they probably have a selection of inserts.

If you have access to a lathe it would be simple to make a stepped stud allowing you to simply use the next larger threads in the manifold and leave the carburetor flange unmolested..

Drilling the carburetor flange to a larger size seems like a really Mickey Mouse "repair". I sure wouldn't do it


Ray
Re: Stripped intake threads.
Matttttttttttttt #1287893 Sat Nov 17 2018 11:34 PM
Joined: May 2005
Posts: 7,535
B
General Purpose
Enlarging the carb clearance hole is down on the list. In case a person runs into trouble. We are only talking .031 or less, larger on the radius. It's in the "Goofy" range but not Mickey Mouse.

Mickey Mouse is JB Weld. I got that in my back pocket.



Watch out for careful drivers!!!
I'm away on an ego trip. Will be back on Feb 30.
I'm not an Auto Mechanic, but I play one on TV.
I charge $0.02 for every opinion and I take Paypal.
Plan B is always better than plan A, by definition.
You can't teach a new dog old tricks.


Re: Stripped intake threads.
bartamos #1287902 Sun Nov 18 2018 12:32 AM
Joined: Mar 2010
Posts: 9,450
5
Master Gabster
Originally Posted by bartamos
Enlarging the carb clearance hole is down on the list. In case a person runs into trouble. We are only talking .031 or less, larger on the radius. It's in the "Goofy" range but not Mickey Mouse.

Mickey Mouse is JB Weld. I got that in my back pocket.


Everything prior to this post was all, blah, blah, blah, blah fricking blah to me. Now, finally, someone starts talking my lingo!
Thank you bartamos!

Edit: There was plenty of good info provided in this thread. Just sayin'.
Carl

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