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Re: Working on Stainless Trim
Achipmunk #1258071 Sat Mar 10 2018 02:45 AM
Joined: Jul 2013
Posts: 986
Shop Shark
The final polish with Flitz or Semichome polish removes all of the microscopic particles of steel left by the #0000 steel wool.


"Pay attention to the details! It ALWAYS pays off."

1949 Chevrolet 3100 Series 1/2 ton Pickup
1964 Chevrolet C10 (Ol' Yella) (SOLD)
1958 Chevrolet Biscayne 2 door (SOLD)
1970 VW Beetle
Re: Working on Stainless Trim
Achipmunk #1258095 Sat Mar 10 2018 04:26 AM
Joined: Dec 2001
Posts: 15,270
Boltergeist
I had already used 0000 steel wool, have polished it and then waxed it. What is left I think I can get with a 1500 grit paper. Its really not that bad. Thanks Mar-K for your input. I'll have to keep the scotch-brite in mind.

I had a nice slooow grinder but it was a cheapo that bit the dust....and the hand held one went in the junk pile. No use keeping something to cuss every time you pick it up...and my 1/2 hp regular grinder I bought in 1986 is still running but its to fast.
Maybe time to break down and get me another nice hand held.

Thanks again fellows. I appreciate the comments and guidance.



1937 Chevy Pickup [stovebolt.com]
1952 Chevy Panel [stovebolt.com]
Pictures in my Photobucket [s140.photobucket.com]
1950 Chevy Coupe
https://photos.google.com/share/AF1...Nko1cUJCNFFMTVFEUnNRbjFhNTFPc1J4YWV4cmRB

52 Chevy Panel [photos.app.goo.gl]

I'd rather walk and carry a Chevy hub cap than ride in a Ferd.
I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you smile
Re: Working on Stainless Trim
Mar-Ktech #1258139 Sat Mar 10 2018 03:58 PM
Joined: Oct 2015
Posts: 349
F
Shop Shark
Originally Posted by Mar-Ktech
It is risky to use steel wool to polish stainless. The microscopic particles of steel left behind will cause stainless to rust, especially the nonmagnetic 300 series stainless. We have used a Scotchbrite fine light deburring wheel on a bench grinder to remove tooling marks prior to buffing trim pieces with good results. Scotchbrite hand pads are less effective. If you use wet/dry paper, start with no more coarse than 320 and go to 600 and maybe 1000 before buffing with a buffing wheel. Try to have your sanding motion with each finer grit not exactly parallel to the motion of the previous, but at a slight angle, maybe 30 degrees or so. Your last passes should be parallel to the trim piece edges not across it. Those scratches remaining will be much less visible.

Good luck with your project.

Mar-Ktech

Where the heck was this information before I spent 120 hours on my stainless trim? This one post would have saved me many hours of work.

Mar Ktech, can you post a part number or picture of the "Scotchbrite fine light deburring wheel"?

Thanks


~~ Darcy

1959 GMC 9310 Canadian- built Shortbox Fleetside Deluxe
FootStomper
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Re: Working on Stainless Trim
Achipmunk #1258179 Sat Mar 10 2018 09:48 PM
Joined: Dec 2001
Posts: 15,270
Boltergeist
This is why I love the Bolt. Our situation is unique to the condition of the part which may require different approaches. Some are inherent but some need a broad spectrum of approach....depending on the individual situation.
(Boy, those are some fancy words from an old ridge runner) hehe

.....I can see merit in all the post. I like it this way, I can "see it all" and make the decision that suits me. That is why I like to watch the responses for a day or two, when I can, to gather more info and opinions. Bolters Rock.


1937 Chevy Pickup [stovebolt.com]
1952 Chevy Panel [stovebolt.com]
Pictures in my Photobucket [s140.photobucket.com]
1950 Chevy Coupe
https://photos.google.com/share/AF1...Nko1cUJCNFFMTVFEUnNRbjFhNTFPc1J4YWV4cmRB

52 Chevy Panel [photos.app.goo.gl]

I'd rather walk and carry a Chevy hub cap than ride in a Ferd.
I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you smile
Re: Working on Stainless Trim
FootStomper #1258204 Sun Mar 11 2018 03:02 AM
Joined: Dec 2005
Posts: 409
M
Shop Shark
Originally Posted by FootStomper


Mar Ktech, can you post a part number or picture of the "Scotchbrite fine light deburring wheel"?

Thanks


Do a search on eBay or Amazon for "Scotchbrite 7S fine light deburring wheel". Also available from places like MSC or Travers tool. 6" wheel works fine on a typical bench grinder at 3450 rpm. The wheel is rated for 6000 rpm. Available usually in 1" or 1/2" thick. The '7' in the part number refers to the firmness or density of the wheel. It will conform slightly to the shape of the trim piece. If you are doing actual deburring of machined or sawed parts go with the '9' density which is more dense.

The Scotchbrite wheel can be shaped to match the shape of your part with a coarse sanding disc, such as 36 grit. That is helpful in working a concave type part such as the cab molding you were repairing. By the way, nice work. That is some real thin stainless.

Mar-Ktech

Re: Working on Stainless Trim
Achipmunk #1258221 Sun Mar 11 2018 07:58 AM
Joined: Oct 2014
Posts: 25
D
Don Offline
Wrench Fetcher
I had a small scratch on my top radiator tank from when they formed it. I used some fine flower then some fine corn starch. It took a long time to get the scratch out but it was a small area on the tank and worth the effort. I never would of thought it would do it but a old guy used that trick to clean up Aluminum. I forgot to mention this was done using a dry paper towel
62 blue

Last edited by Don; Sun Mar 11 2018 08:00 AM. Reason: added to post
Re: Working on Stainless Trim
Achipmunk #1258711 Thu Mar 15 2018 02:33 PM
Joined: Apr 2016
Posts: 585
M
Shop Shark
You can buy stainless steel wool.


Old enough to know better, too young to resist.
Re: Working on Stainless Trim
Achipmunk #1260373 Tue Mar 27 2018 03:05 PM
Joined: Aug 2013
Posts: 246
D
Shop Shark
My two bits don't ever use a circular motion on any stainless! Only straight line or as suggested slight angle.
All of mine was done starting with 800 grit and then 1000 then finished with 2000 and the Flitz on a slow buffing wheel.


1950 Chevrolet 5-Window Canadian manufactured 1-Ton with Dump Bed / Hoist
In the Stovebolt Gallery
More pix on Photobucket
You will never stop learning new things, no matter how old you are.
Re: Working on Stainless Trim
Achipmunk #1260390 Tue Mar 27 2018 05:08 PM
Joined: Jul 2011
Posts: 703
M
Shop Shark
We have some trim that had the fine scratches you describe, we used 3M trizact discs with a foam interface pad (to keep from sanding in flat spots) to remove the fine scratches and then polished out the stainless...


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4VLocC_ZfJ0


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vqcVXg-UXEQ

Re: Working on Stainless Trim
Achipmunk #1272845 Tue Jul 17 2018 07:58 PM
Joined: Nov 2008
Posts: 556
A
Shop Shark
There are some great youtube videos out there as well. I had the opportunity to spend a couple hours with a guy who polishes stainless steel for a living. His bread and butter are old bel-aire's and earlier. When i was there he was working on the trim for a 40s cadillac convertible. Irreplaceable pieces, pretty rough shape. Dents came out with a pick on oak block, smoothed with a file, then sanded down progressively. His final sand was 3000grit wet mibro. Then he went to buffing wheels and rouge. he sanded everything 440 and finer wet. and in a straight line. when it was done, you could see yourself clearer than in a mirror. it was enlightening. he is a craftsman. and his work reflects it. after he was all done, he said it wasn't hard, but the key is to go step by step and don't skip any steps. Identical to prep work for a paint job.

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