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#1234274 - Mon Sep 11 2017 04:50 PM Re: Shop walls are a SUCCESS! [Re: Cosmo]  
Lugnutz  Offline
Shop Shark
Joined: Sep 2011
Posts: 1,510
South Carolina
Originally Posted by Cosmo
Great Job! How are you going to manage a corner stud for the back (rear) wall?

I'll probably fasten a trimmed down 2X4 to the inside corner where the right wall meets the back wall. Then screw my horizontal 1X4 strips to those. I need to get a little creative.



#1234275 - Mon Sep 11 2017 05:02 PM Re: Shop walls are a SUCCESS! [Re: Lugnutz]  
Hotrod Lincoln  Online
Boltergeist
Joined: Feb 2004
Posts: 15,184
Dellrose, TN
Rip a 2X4 down the middle and attach it to the metal upright with self-drilling screws. That's the simplest way to provide a place to drive wood screws. I'll be doing something similar when I frame out the interior walls of my shop, but the PVC electrical conduit is going to go in first. One entire 40' wall will be dedicated to machine tools, so there will be a fair amount of electrical work involved.
Jerry



The murder victim was drowned in a bathtub full of Rice Krispies and milk.
The coroner blamed the crime on a cereal killer!

Cringe and wail in fear, Eloi- - - - -we Morlocks are on the hunt!

#1234279 - Mon Sep 11 2017 05:22 PM Re: Shop walls are a SUCCESS! [Re: Lugnutz]  
tclederman  Online
Joined: Sep 2001
Posts: 25,685
Jarvisburg, NC
Jerry,

Will you have air-hose/tool piping outlets throughout the shop?
If so, how will you plumb those?

Thanks,


Tim
1954Advance-Design.com
1954 3106 Carryall Suburban - part of the family for 46 years
1954 3104 5-window pickup w/Hydra-Matic
Z-series (54/55) GMC 350 (2-ton) COE
If you have to stomp on your foot-pedal starter, either you, or your starter, or your engine, has a problem.

#1234309 - Mon Sep 11 2017 08:45 PM Re: Shop walls are a SUCCESS! [Re: Lugnutz]  
Hotrod Lincoln  Online
Boltergeist
Joined: Feb 2004
Posts: 15,184
Dellrose, TN
I'm an old-school builder- - - -air lines will be black iron pipe, probably 3/4" NPT. I've seen a few shops plumbed for air with PVC, but I've also seen the aftermath of a couple of pipe fatigue fractures using that stuff. The main thing to remember is just like with any other plumbing, "Schtuff" flows downhill! Air lines need to have enough downward slope to allow a drain at the end of each pipe run to effectively eliminate moisture, and the drains should be opened frequently! I'll probably incorporate a refrigeration-style drier somewhere in the system, but NOT close to the compressor. Hot compressed air is very difficult to de-water. I like to run the air compressor output pipe up to ceiling level, all the way across the shop, then plumb it back down to floor level to the drier. That puts distance and gravity on my side so the drier has the best chance to do its job effectively.
Jerry


The murder victim was drowned in a bathtub full of Rice Krispies and milk.
The coroner blamed the crime on a cereal killer!

Cringe and wail in fear, Eloi- - - - -we Morlocks are on the hunt!

#1234324 - Mon Sep 11 2017 10:12 PM Re: Shop walls are a SUCCESS! [Re: Lugnutz]  
klhansen  Offline
Shop Shark
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 390
Eagle River, Alaska
There are a couple of plastic pipe materials that are "rated" for compressed air, but I'm with you, Jerry on the black iron pipe. It won't explode on you.
As far as piping compressed air, a generous water trap w/drain at the compressor before going overhead, then sloped down to the last outlet which should have another valved water trap at the bottom. Any intermediate taps between compressor should be taken off from the top of the main and then turned down to the outlet. They should probably also have at least a drip leg on the bottom as well, with the tap coming off the side of the drop.
Air can hold more moisture as it gets compressed (and heated up), and it loses it's capacity to hold water as it cools down in the pipe runs. A refrigerated dryer works fine immediately after the compressor as the hot air is passing over really cold (below dew point) surfaces which sucks the water out. But letting it cool down first works as well, just adds more pipe to the system.


Kevin
First car '29 Ford Special Coupe
#2 - '29 Ford pickup restored from the ground up.
Newest Project - 51 Chevy 3100 work truck.

#1234331 - Mon Sep 11 2017 11:27 PM Re: Shop walls are a SUCCESS! [Re: Lugnutz]  
tclederman  Online
Joined: Sep 2001
Posts: 25,685
Jarvisburg, NC
Jerry & Kevin, Thanks for the advice/information.

I used black pipe in New York, and, I will now (based on your comments) also use black pipe in NC.

I will also again follow this Tech Tip from TP Tools (and, this diagram).

It served me well for a long time when I lived in NY.


Attached Files

Tim
1954Advance-Design.com
1954 3106 Carryall Suburban - part of the family for 46 years
1954 3104 5-window pickup w/Hydra-Matic
Z-series (54/55) GMC 350 (2-ton) COE
If you have to stomp on your foot-pedal starter, either you, or your starter, or your engine, has a problem.

#1234433 - Tue Sep 12 2017 03:28 PM Re: Shop walls are a SUCCESS! [Re: Lugnutz]  
Hotrod Lincoln  Online
Boltergeist
Joined: Feb 2004
Posts: 15,184
Dellrose, TN
I dealt with an improperly-engineered dryer system for 20-something years at the high school where I taught auto mechanics. The compressors had plenty of capacity- - - -two 30 HP compressors with 500 gallon tanks and a 3" diameter output line, but the output went directly into a big chiller dryer instead of being located across the equipment room about 30 feet like it should have been. That system supplied 12 shops- - - -aircraft, auto body, welding, refrigeration, electronics, wood shop, printing, etc. Moisture in the air lines was a chronic problem, and nobody was interested in listening to my suggestions to fix it. Sometimes I'd have to let the air run for 30 minutes before it got dry enough to paint a car without contaminating the paint I was spraying, and I had water traps in the body shop to supplement the building dryer system!
Jerry


The murder victim was drowned in a bathtub full of Rice Krispies and milk.
The coroner blamed the crime on a cereal killer!

Cringe and wail in fear, Eloi- - - - -we Morlocks are on the hunt!

#1235234 - Mon Sep 18 2017 02:29 AM Re: Shop walls are a SUCCESS! [Re: Lugnutz]  
Lugnutz  Offline
Shop Shark
Joined: Sep 2011
Posts: 1,510
South Carolina
The first wall is done and I'm starting on the back wall. Primer was applied today and I must say it looks pretty good so far.

HERE are a few more pictures.


#1235253 - Mon Sep 18 2017 11:38 AM Re: Shop walls are a SUCCESS! [Re: Lugnutz]  
MNSmith  Offline

"Hey! I sound like Darth Vader!!
Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 2,329
So Cal
Nice work!

Hopefully, you will paint with a light color? It will help with lighting. Although, that was always the battle. Light paint would show the dirt.

One trick, in some of the shops I worked at, was to paint a dark color from the floor, up 6 feet. Then do a light color to the ceiling to help reflect light.


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Moderated by  48bigtrucks, MNSmith 

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