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#1229434 - Thu Aug 10 2017 02:25 PM 1937 truck horn and fuel gauge  
dalef62  Offline
Moderated
Joined: Aug 2017
Posts: 2
PA
Hello,
I am new here and I am working on a 1937 truck with a 12 volt conversion. It has an alternator and turn signals, and I am installing a new wiring harness.
I have a few questions, one is, how does the horn connect at the button. I got a new rubber button and cap and it has a hard wire unit that mounts in the rubber that goes down into the steering column. Where does the wire connect and what makes the contact?
The second question is, Do I need a Runtz resister on the fuel gauge? It is the original gauge and a new 12 volt sending unit. And if I do, where should it be placed? on the positive side of the gauge or between the gauge and the sending unit?
Thanks for the help!!
Dale


1937 Chevrolet Truck


#1229730 - Sat Aug 12 2017 03:33 PM Re: 1937 truck horn and fuel gauge [Re: dalef62]  
dalef62  Offline
Moderated
Joined: Aug 2017
Posts: 2
PA
Anyone have any ideas??


1937 Chevrolet Truck

#1229733 - Sat Aug 12 2017 04:11 PM Re: 1937 truck horn and fuel gauge [Re: dalef62]  
baldeagle  Offline
Server Fixer
Joined: Mar 2000
Posts: 3,029
Richardson, TX, USA
I don't know the specifics of the '37, but, in general, horns have one wire. The horn ring, when the horn is depressed, completes the circuit by making ground. So, the horn would have two wires going to it. One is hot, tied to the battery directly (or indirectly - but hot all the time), and the other is a ground wire that goes to the horn ring. This is a pdf of the wiring for a '37. http://chevy.oldcarmanualproject.com/electrical/wiring/pdf/37truck.pdf


Paul Schmehl CI 31
geek@stovebolt.com
Stovebolt Staff: Geek
1948 Chevy 3100 Five Window

#1229766 - Sat Aug 12 2017 08:48 PM Re: 1937 truck horn and fuel gauge [Re: dalef62]  
46Sparky  Offline
Shop Shark
Joined: Feb 2008
Posts: 706
USA
Yes, there is a single, ground wire that runs from the mast bearing in the steering column down to a port at the bottom near the steering box. That wire has a plug-in type connector to join with the wiring harness. There is a wire, 12 gauge (?) in the harness with one end leading to the horn for power and another wire, for the continuation of the ground connection to the horn.

If your truck was converted to 12 volt and powered up before a resistor was installed, the fuel gauge sending unit might be already damaged. The wiring instructions for a Runtz resistor are included with the package when purchased. The resistor is attached to the lug on left side (door side) of the fuel gauge. If your truck has other accessories, a resistor will be needed for each one.


#1229879 - Sun Aug 13 2017 04:49 PM Re: 1937 truck horn and fuel gauge [Re: dalef62]  
Tiny  Offline
Global Mod
Joined: Aug 2005
Posts: 10,955
South Central Kansas
OK Dale, you have one of THESE in your mast jacket (steering column). It is called the Mast Jacket Bushing. The steering mast (shaft) passes through the center bushing. The wire you see exits the jacket under the hood, just above the steering gear box. That wire connects to the horn ground circuit.

You also have THIS ASSEMBLY that mounts inside the hub of your steering wheel. The "S" wire passes through two holes in the center hub of the steering wheel. The rubber bushing attaches to the "S" end of the "S" wire and fits into a groove in the steering wheel hub. The cap then fits on top of the rubber bushing.

When you push on the horn button, the "S" wire travels through the holes in the SW hub and makes contact with the copper ring on top of the bushing. At the same time the "S" wire contacts the edge of the hole(s) of the SW hub, completing the ground and makes the horn honk. It's not the best system but it works....most of the time.

All of the above is assuming the '37 truck is the same as my '38 coupe. If it's not I apologize for muddying the water & I'll go stand in the corner and mind my own business.

Last edited by Tiny; Sun Aug 13 2017 04:56 PM.

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#1229889 - Sun Aug 13 2017 05:47 PM Re: 1937 truck horn and fuel gauge [Re: dalef62]  
46Sparky  Offline
Shop Shark
Joined: Feb 2008
Posts: 706
USA
The photos look like I what I recall seeing in my '37 1/2 ton truck too.



Moderated by  Rusty Rod 

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