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Tacking panels together using the TIG
#1193122 Wed Nov 30 2016 02:01 PM
Joined: Jul 2011
Posts: 705
M
MPandC Offline OP
Shop Shark
Tig welding can be a better choice in our rust repair endeavors, providing we can get a good fitup. Next step would be to tack from one end of the panel to the other to hold things in check as you make that long weld pass. Here's a video we did last night to show our tacking method.. The electrode was moved side to side over the seam to EXACTLY locate the seam, then raised for the tack.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aTqQJoecqCw







.

Re: Tacking panels together using the TIG
MPandC #1193238 Thu Dec 01 2016 03:03 AM
Joined: Mar 2010
Posts: 9,520
5
Master Gabster
Thanks for sharing the video. Now that I am completely done with all of the sheet metal welding that I will ever likely do, I can now rest, knowing how I should have done it. smile
BTW, I would suggest avoid making any "long weld passes" on sheet metal with TIG or MIG. Your formerly calm sea smooth panel will end up looking like the angry sea on "Deadliest Catch" day.
Carl

Re: Tacking panels together using the TIG
52Carl #1193282 Thu Dec 01 2016 01:08 PM
Joined: Jul 2011
Posts: 705
M
MPandC Offline OP
Shop Shark
I would agree on the long passes with MIG as that would be close to impossible, but with the TIG or O/A gas welding, a full weld pass with no gaps should eliminate much of the distortion realized providing the panels were tacked first to hold things.. Of course, all this assumes weld placement in a good panel is not in the flat low crown area of a door, etc. There's no shape there to help hold things, and things ARE going to move. Weld placement should be based on accessibility for planishing and panel details to help hold things from getting carried away (bend lines, bead details, etc)

We'll video the next step after tacking this evening..

Re: Tacking panels together using the TIG
MPandC #1193394 Fri Dec 02 2016 02:46 AM
Joined: Mar 2010
Posts: 9,520
5
Master Gabster
If you can run a full weld pass on flat 18 gauge with a TIG without significant warping, you are the man. I can't wait to see the video.
I am still impressed with the video showing the high amp quick zap for the tack welds. While that notion crossed my mind when I was overheating my panels with a lower amp setting, I never had the stones to experiment with it.

Last edited by 52Carl; Fri Dec 02 2016 02:51 AM.
Re: Tacking panels together using the TIG
MPandC #1193417 Fri Dec 02 2016 04:41 AM
Joined: Feb 2004
Posts: 21,837
H
Boltergeist
I've seen several body men on Okinawa do a continuous pass with a needle-sharp acetylene flame on body metal with virtually no distortion and no fill rod- - - -just butt-weld the seam together on a tightly-fitted patch panel. It was a real education! I can do it, but not as neatly as some of those guys did!
Jerry


The murder victim was drowned in a bathtub full of Rice Krispies and milk.
The coroner blamed the crime on a cereal killer!

Cringe and wail in fear, Eloi- - - - -we Morlocks are on the hunt!
Re: Tacking panels together using the TIG
52Carl #1193428 Fri Dec 02 2016 06:15 AM
Joined: Jul 2011
Posts: 705
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MPandC Offline OP
Shop Shark
Originally Posted by 52Carl
If you can run a full weld pass on flat 18 gauge with a TIG without significant warping, you are the man. I can't wait to see the video.
I am still impressed with the video showing the high amp quick zap for the tack welds. While that notion crossed my mind when I was overheating my panels with a lower amp setting, I never had the stones to experiment with it.


Carl, think of your speed as a heat control. By using the lower heat setting you are possibly sitting there longer and widening the Heat Affected Zone. The welds I did this evening still had the machine set at 70 amps, and used a faster torch travel to control realized heat at the panel. HAZ was relatively narrow. Next, starting and stopping, regardless of the process, is where you see most distortion added. So if we can use a process that is more user friendly to a full weld pass (TIG or O/A) we can eliminate another source of distortion....

Re: Tacking panels together using the TIG
MPandC #1193430 Fri Dec 02 2016 06:40 AM
Joined: Jul 2011
Posts: 705
M
MPandC Offline OP
Shop Shark
Here's the pictures of the TIG welds... As shown in the link, the trick to the full pass welds with TIG is initial tacking but more importantly, to use body features that will minimize or help control the distortion. Sure, a low crown area of a door skin is going to be the worst. Pick a spot up high on the door and now the higher crown of this area helps to control distortion more than the low crown below. Find an area adjacent to a beltline bead detail and it helps even more. Become more selective about where you put the weld seams for panel repair and it will help control all that distortion.


http://www.garagejournal.com/forum/showpost.php?p=6137723&postcount=2151


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