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#1155131 Tue Mar 15 2016 02:49 PM
Joined: Feb 2011
Posts: 952
R
rickmg Offline OP
'Bolter
I'm contemplating buying an air shear, or air nibbler. I'm tired of doing it with hand shears. Do any of you folks have any input on this subject? It would be greatly appreciated.

Rick

rickmg #1155138 Tue Mar 15 2016 03:07 PM
Joined: Apr 2005
Posts: 10,804
Grease Monkey, Moderator General Truck Talk & Greasy Spoon
From what I see they produce a bit of extra waste but sure make the job go quickly.


Martin
'62 Chevy C-10 Stepside Shortbed (Restomod in progress)
'47 Chevy 3100 5 Window (long term project)
‘65 Chevy Biscayne 4dr 230 I-6 one owner (I’m #2) “Emily”
‘39 Dodge Businessmans Coupe “Clarence”



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rickmg #1155146 Tue Mar 15 2016 04:03 PM
Joined: Feb 2004
Posts: 24,575
H
Kettle Custodian (pot stirrer)
They only work on relatively thin metal, and the cutting dies wear out quickly. Don't buy the cheap import item that Harbor Freight sells- - - -it wears out in a real hurry!

I've found that a set of LONG handled shears are best for making straight or slightly curved cuts, ones with handles 18" long or more. The extra leverage makes cutting even 16 gauge metal easy.
Jerry


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rickmg #1155147 Tue Mar 15 2016 04:04 PM
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 5,060
2
Mixed Up
Nibblers work slick, but cut about 1/8 to 3/16 wide waste.
Let us know what you get.

Don


Of all the things I've lost in my life, I miss my mind the most!

1967 GMC 9500 Fire Ladder Truck
"The Flag Pole"
In the Stovebolt Gallery [stovebolt.com]
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rickmg #1155194 Tue Mar 15 2016 07:52 PM
Joined: Mar 2007
Posts: 5,041
Leo Offline
'Bolter
I've been cutting sheet metal for 40 years, roofing and siding. For most of that time I've used electric shears, either Kett or Milwaukee brand. I tried the nibblers but they leave a lot of pieces of metal behind. The shears just leave a 1/4" strip. They will cut up to 16 or 18 gauge but I have not done heavier than 26. They are easily sharpened. The best hand shears I've ever had was an old Wiss (very old) that we got at a farm auction in the bottom of a box of junk for a buck.

Leo #1155304 Wed Mar 16 2016 02:01 PM
Joined: Apr 2004
Posts: 975
C
'Bolter
I like the Milwaukee shear for most work. I have a few sets of hand shears. I also use a nibbler....I like that for round cuts. It does cut a wider strip, works ok with a straight edge but leaves those nasty little quarter moon shapes that seem to collect anywhere there is a roll, joint or crevice in your body....lol
Dan

Chev4t6 #1155362 Wed Mar 16 2016 10:26 PM
Joined: Jun 2005
Posts: 426
A
Shop Shark
53Panel, if you have cut 16 & 18 gauge then you have cut heavier than 26! The larger the number, the lighter the gauge. such as... 26, 24, 22, 20, 18, 16, 14... 26 being the lighter. Retired sheet metal worker after 42 years.

AD_Pickup #1155385 Thu Mar 17 2016 01:11 AM
Joined: Mar 2007
Posts: 5,041
Leo Offline
'Bolter
Originally Posted by AD_Pickup
53Panel, if you have cut 16 & 18 gauge then you have cut heavier than 26! The larger the number, the lighter the gauge. such as... 26, 24, 22, 20, 18, 16, 14... 26 being the lighter. Retired sheet metal worker after 42 years.


I know my gauges. I can tell by feel what gauge the steel is, from 26 down to 30. I have never cut heavier than 26, not sure why you think I did.

rickmg #1155736 Sat Mar 19 2016 06:18 AM
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 2,450
S
'Bolter
I think he read your statement "they will cut 16 or 18 gauge" as that you HAD done that.


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When wrestling a grizzly bear, you have to keep at it until the bear gets tired, not when you get tired.


1948 Chevy 2-Ton [stovebolt.com]

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