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Truck/Car lifts #1154265 Wed Mar 09 2016 07:23 PM
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 3,826
2-Ton Offline OP
Shop Shark
I'am thinking about getting a truck/car lift.
Anyone have any preference over a two post or four post lift?
Lift capacity?
My preference right now is a two post rated at 10,000 pounds. But I would have to cut out the shop floor and pour a thicker base. It's about five inches with rebar now and they say you need at least ten inches.
All thoughts are welcome, pro's and con's.

Thanks
Don


Of all the things I've lost in my life, I miss my mind the most!

1967 GMC 9500 Fire Ladder Truck
"The Flag Pole"
In the Stovebolt Gallery
More pix on Photobucket
'46 2-Ton grain truck
'48 3/4-ton grain truck
'50 2-ton flatbed
'54 Pontiac Straight Eight
'70 American LaFrance pumper fire truck.
Re: Truck/Car lifts [Re: 2-Ton] #1154282 Wed Mar 09 2016 09:59 PM
Joined: Apr 2005
Posts: 7,876
J
Justhorsenround Online
Grease Monkey, Moderator General Truck Talk & Greasy Spoon
Two post lifts make working on wheels and suspension parts along with exhaust easier. More costly to install. Require getting down on your knees to set the arms and setting the stand offs can be tricky at times. They require you to be more safety conscious.

Four post lifts can be free standing and easier to position the vehicle on. You have to be creative or purchase the air/hydrolic jacking attachment to get the wheels up for work. In my opinion they are safer for the hobby user.

I like my 4 post lift for the convienence of installing the wheels and moving it around as needed.


Martin
'62 Chevy C-10 Stepside Shortbed (Restomod in progress)
'47 Chevy 3100 5 Window (long term project)
‘65 Chevy Biscayne 4dr 230 I-6 one owner (I’m #2)
‘39 Dodge Businessmans Coupe


"I fought the law and the law won" now I are a retired one!
Support those brave men/women who stand the "Thin Blue Line" and lock up those on the wrong side of that line.

Re: Truck/Car lifts [Re: 2-Ton] #1154286 Wed Mar 09 2016 10:36 PM
Joined: May 2005
Posts: 9,134
G
Grigg Offline
.
I've researched them a few times and keep coming back to a Mohawk 12,000 lb two post lift as the first choice and a Rotary 12,000 lb as second choice. Both brands also offer a 15 or 16,000 lb which are mostly the same physical size as the 12,000lb versions. I wouldn't mind either.

http://www.mohawklifts.com/wp/automotive-lifts/2-post-lifts/lmf-12-tp-16/

http://www.rotarylift.com/Lifts/SPO12/

They're both expensive new but on several occasions I've seen them for sale used and appeared in good shape for a fraction of the new cost. If you have time then searching for a used one might pay off. I gave up looking for now until I'm really ready to buy one and install it.

Check the concrete specs recommended for the lift you do decide on because your existing slab may be adequate.

Grigg


1951 GMC 250 in the Project Journals
1948 Chevrolet 6400 - Detroit Diesel 4-53T - Roadranger 10 speed overdrive - 4 wheel disc brakes
1952 Chevrolet 3800 pickup
---All pictures---
"First, get a clear notion of what you desire to accomplish, and then in all probability you will succeed in doing it..." -Henry Maudslay-
Re: Truck/Car lifts [Re: 2-Ton] #1154289 Wed Mar 09 2016 10:49 PM
Joined: Feb 2004
Posts: 19,261
H
Hotrod Lincoln Offline
Boltergeist
I started out using single and dual cylinder in-ground lifts, and when above-ground systems came along it was the best thing since sliced bread! I've used 2-post, 4-post and scissors lifts, and unless you're doing a lot of wheel alignment, the 2-post is the best idea. Check with your local commercial lift distributor- - -most of them will have slightly-used lifts they have repo'ed from shops that go out of business, and they are usually willing to sell and install them at a bargain price. For the hobby-type user, you don't need the latest and greatest thing on the market, just something that's safe and reliable.
Jerry


The murder victim was drowned in a bathtub full of Rice Krispies and milk.
The coroner blamed the crime on a cereal killer!

Cringe and wail in fear, Eloi- - - - -we Morlocks are on the hunt!
Re: Truck/Car lifts [Re: 2-Ton] #1154318 Thu Mar 10 2016 02:29 AM
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 3,826
2-Ton Offline OP
Shop Shark
Thank's guys!
I really like the two pole lifts for more access to the under carriage.
12,000 pounder would be sweet and safe for the old red Ferd diesel.
Heck. it would also lift a Goldwing.
Thinking now about some steel mounting plates instead of cutting and digging out the floor to pour a thicker base.
1/2 inch plate and big enough to make a big foot print connected to both posts? Anchored in at least 12 places with 3/8 to 1/2 anchor bolts. I like overkill for safety.
It still may be a day dream, but you never know what may come along.

Thanks
Don


Of all the things I've lost in my life, I miss my mind the most!

1967 GMC 9500 Fire Ladder Truck
"The Flag Pole"
In the Stovebolt Gallery
More pix on Photobucket
'46 2-Ton grain truck
'48 3/4-ton grain truck
'50 2-ton flatbed
'54 Pontiac Straight Eight
'70 American LaFrance pumper fire truck.
Re: Truck/Car lifts [Re: 2-Ton] #1154337 Thu Mar 10 2016 03:21 AM
Joined: Feb 2004
Posts: 19,261
H
Hotrod Lincoln Offline
Boltergeist
If you approximately double the footprint of the lift columns with a 1/2" steel plate, that should be safe enough, and probably less expensive than digging up the floor. That's what I plan to do with the 6" thick floor of my shop when I install a twin-post lift soon.
Jerry


The murder victim was drowned in a bathtub full of Rice Krispies and milk.
The coroner blamed the crime on a cereal killer!

Cringe and wail in fear, Eloi- - - - -we Morlocks are on the hunt!
Re: Truck/Car lifts [Re: 2-Ton] #1154367 Thu Mar 10 2016 01:25 PM
Joined: May 2005
Posts: 9,134
G
Grigg Offline
.
Have an engineer look over your 1/2" plate idea. The lift manufacturer might help out. I'd be concerned 1/2" might not be stiff enough to add much effective footprint.

My plan is to remove a section of concrete as wide as the whole lift and front to back a few feet more than the bases. Dig out under it for a well overkilled reinforced concrete slab/block dovetailed under the remaining slab. This would be the cleanest solution and is recommended by the lift manufactures.


1951 GMC 250 in the Project Journals
1948 Chevrolet 6400 - Detroit Diesel 4-53T - Roadranger 10 speed overdrive - 4 wheel disc brakes
1952 Chevrolet 3800 pickup
---All pictures---
"First, get a clear notion of what you desire to accomplish, and then in all probability you will succeed in doing it..." -Henry Maudslay-
Re: Truck/Car lifts [Re: 2-Ton] #1154380 Thu Mar 10 2016 02:58 PM
Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 2,691
MNSmith Offline
"Hey! I sound like Darth Vader!!
I've worked with 2 post in ground, 3 post in ground, 65,000 lb cantilever, 2 post above ground and 2 post side by side in ground. My favorite to date is the 2 post side by side in ground. Takes up less space and I can drive over them if I need to. I had to price the 2 post side by side in ground once. Installed for the 10,000 lb Rotary was $2500. Something to think about is you are going to cut concrete anyway. I'll try to remember to take some pictures today.


BTW, drive over is important in my shop as I am 6 bays, 12 doors, almost all drive through. Two aren't drive through as I made them machine/storage/fabricating areas.

Last edited by MNSmith; Thu Mar 10 2016 03:01 PM.
Re: Truck/Car lifts [Re: 2-Ton] #1154382 Thu Mar 10 2016 03:10 PM
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 3,826
2-Ton Offline OP
Shop Shark
Grigg
What about some kind of trusses/gussets welded/clamped on the front and rear of the lift? Lets say 2 to 3 foot each way.
They would be a tripping hazard, but I would think that would really spread out a firm foot print.
If I go the concrete replacement, I would probably go at least six foot on the front and rear and 10+ inches thick with plenty of rebar.
When it comes to anybody's life. I really like, the over kill way. Pun intended.

Don

Last edited by 2-Ton; Thu Mar 10 2016 06:38 PM.

Of all the things I've lost in my life, I miss my mind the most!

1967 GMC 9500 Fire Ladder Truck
"The Flag Pole"
In the Stovebolt Gallery
More pix on Photobucket
'46 2-Ton grain truck
'48 3/4-ton grain truck
'50 2-ton flatbed
'54 Pontiac Straight Eight
'70 American LaFrance pumper fire truck.
Re: Truck/Car lifts [Re: 2-Ton] #1154489 Thu Mar 10 2016 11:49 PM
Joined: Mar 2007
Posts: 4,840
1953 panel Offline
Shop Shark
It's good to consider the floor thickness and all that. What about the compressive strength of the concrete, that's just as important. It could be 2500 psi or it could be 5000 psi, big difference. Also what is under the floor, compacted aggregate or loose fill?

As for the lift itself, I put in a 9000 lb 2 post lift. I have been very happy with it. Before we poured the floor, I dug down 3' square x 10" thick under the posts and added rebar.

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