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Re: Mig welding tips & tricks [Re: MPandC] #1024121 Fri Apr 25 2014 03:52 AM
Joined: Jan 2013
Posts: 1,438
A
Allen Lane Offline
Shop Shark
The former. I bought the complete series of DVD's from Hot Rod Mag that takes a car from the salvage yard to complete frame off restoration including replacing complete floor panel, quarter panels, a couple patch panels, and other patches here and there. Those guys use a blacksmith type anvil an awful lot for flattening, rounding, punching, etc. Curious what you're using.



Allen
Yeah, well, that's just like, you know , your opinion, man - The Dude

1948 Chevy 3600 - goal Original restoration, Current Stage 1 - Disassembly and getting body in primer
1954 GMC 3100 goal Hot Rod, Current Stage 1 - Get body in primer
1931 Ford Model A 5 window Coupe - Old Skool Hot Rod
1945 Ford 2N Tractor - Runs great, Will restore when run out of other projects
1974 Stingray Corvette

Re: Mig welding tips & tricks for Sheet Metal [Re: MPandC] #1024125 Fri Apr 25 2014 03:57 AM
Joined: Jul 2011
Posts: 614
M
MPandC Offline OP
Shop Shark
Mine is shown in the link below. I bought it used at an auction. I will say, it does contain some defects that would not be ideal for trying to keep sheet metal flat, so I typically will use the bed of my jump shear as a flat anvil for sheet metal.. one of those use whatever works..


http://www.garagejournal.com/forum/showpost.php?p=2832557&postcount=18

Re: Mig welding tips & tricks for Sheet Metal [Re: MPandC] #1024138 Fri Apr 25 2014 04:27 AM
Joined: Jan 2013
Posts: 1,438
A
Allen Lane Offline
Shop Shark
Can't remember for sure, but think the good ones are forged and the cheap ones are cast. Northern sells the cheaper (which I think means softer) ones for $100, is that a waste of money? The more expensive ones are $400 but still don't think they are forged. What do you think?

http://www.northerntool.com/shop/to...132&gclid=CNfz_uTX-r0CFZJj7AodGCIAEQ

Last edited by Allen Lane; Fri Apr 25 2014 01:20 PM.

Allen
Yeah, well, that's just like, you know , your opinion, man - The Dude

1948 Chevy 3600 - goal Original restoration, Current Stage 1 - Disassembly and getting body in primer
1954 GMC 3100 goal Hot Rod, Current Stage 1 - Get body in primer
1931 Ford Model A 5 window Coupe - Old Skool Hot Rod
1945 Ford 2N Tractor - Runs great, Will restore when run out of other projects
1974 Stingray Corvette

Re: Mig welding tips & tricks for Sheet Metal [Re: MPandC] #1024184 Fri Apr 25 2014 01:59 PM
Joined: Jul 2011
Posts: 614
M
MPandC Offline OP
Shop Shark
Personally I'd prefer a vintage piece. Try some searches on ebay, CL, auctionzip, local antique shops?

Re: Mig welding tips & tricks [Re: MPandC] #1024211 Fri Apr 25 2014 03:39 PM
Joined: Jun 2012
Posts: 1,724
S
Steve_H Offline
Shop Shark
Dollys can be made from a bit of rail scrap. Yep the stuff that trains run on. Cut into the shape you want on the band saw and smooth as needed. With a bit of thinking you can get a lot of shapes out of one piece of metal. Call it re-purposing and save the environment. ")


Steve H
Re: Mig welding tips & tricks [Re: MPandC] #1024320 Sat Apr 26 2014 01:59 AM
Joined: Dec 2000
Posts: 3,541
D
Deve Offline
Gas Pumper
I have a friend who insists on Martin hammers. He searches high and low for that brand and wont use anything else. Hes a friend, and I appreciate his expertise and friendship.

A ball peen hammer, baseball bat, shovel, whatever that makes the proper profile will do. I have this cheapo HF 7pc hammer and dolly set. 4 hammers and 3 dollys. I might get that set out, but sometimes its a ball peen hammer and a long punch. What I like about this hobby is when you need to put a shape in metal, you just grab whatever is closest that fits the need. Sometimes its a Craftsman screwdriver. With the lifetime warranty, who cares if it survives. LOL!

Seriously, I have a new friend. Its a REAL anvil with something called a Hardy Hole. This 7/8x7/8 hole in the center of the anvil will accept any tool you put there. I have many very custom forms that I use for just about anything. You just get some 3/4" square solid stock and weld all sorts of rounded, squared, whatever shapes on it, and next thing you know you have a collection of really useful forms. I agree that the more antique hammers are way more useful, but in absence of them, you aren't totally SOL. The honest truth be told, the best restorations are not necessarily coming out of a high end restoration shop. Many of the top ones are coming out of single car garages all over the world.

I am hoping that someday, the vendors will get it, and stop using lamo, crappy composite handles on their hammers festooned with plastic grips that fall off and really get that we are happier as a whole with hardwood. Doesn't matter if its better or not.. more people feel better when they swing a wooden hammer!

Unless its at a loved one... anyhoo... I have a really nice piece of rail that works well too. smile


Deve

1950 Chevy 3100 Deluxe Cab
1950 Chevy 3100 Standard Cab
In the Stovebolt Gallery
The Think Tank
More info and tips at Deve's Technet
Re: Mig welding tips & tricks [Re: MPandC] #1295054 Wed Jan 16 2019 12:32 PM
Joined: Jul 2011
Posts: 614
M
MPandC Offline OP
Shop Shark
Thanks to Jim (Fourbrads) for making this a sticky. Hopefully it will be more easily found by any members new to MIG welding that it would help in their success.

Re: Mig welding tips & tricks [Re: MPandC] #1313001 Mon Jun 03 2019 02:01 PM
Joined: Jun 2005
Posts: 695
V
VEW Offline
Shop Shark
I'm glad I found this thread. Now I know what I was doing wrong!
What can be done about "pin-holes" in sheet metal? I know if I try to do anything, I'm just going to blow a bigger hole in my 41 rear fenders. In some places the metal around them is pretty thin.
Robert, thanks for all you do!


Victor

41 3/4 Ton Pick Up (in process)
55 Grumman Kurbside (Doughboy) 235/3 on tree w/ OD
57 3100
58 C4400 Viking (Thor)
59 C4500 Short Bus (Magic Bus)
59 G3800 1 Ton Dually (Chief)


Re: Mig welding tips & tricks [Re: VEW] #1313006 Mon Jun 03 2019 03:31 PM
Joined: May 2015
Posts: 1,284
K
klhansen Offline
Shop Shark
Originally Posted by VEW
I'm glad I found this thread. Now I know what I was doing wrong!
What can be done about "pin-holes" in sheet metal? I know if I try to do anything, I'm just going to blow a bigger hole in my 41 rear fenders. In some places the metal around them is pretty thin.
Robert, thanks for all you do!

If the pinholes are clean of rust, you can easily weld them up using a piece of copper (flattened copper pipe works well) as a backer. Turn the heat up higher than you would for just the metal thickness and give each pinhole a blip with the MIG gun.


Kevin
First car '29 Ford Special Coupe
#2 - '29 Ford pickup restored from the ground up.
Newest Project - 51 Chevy 3100 work truck. Photos
Re: Mig welding tips & tricks for Sheet Metal [Re: MPandC] #1313021 Mon Jun 03 2019 06:35 PM
Joined: Jul 2011
Posts: 614
M
MPandC Offline OP
Shop Shark
Victor, The fender will normally show you better what is in the inside as far as more extensive damage, over an enclosed panel, so you lucked out there. Personal experience with pin holes and severe pitting has shown a hard rust scale inside the deep pits, and although I did not use this tailgate skin in the below pics, I did test some of the pits for removal methods of the scale. I could not remove the scale completely with either a wire brush or a crud thug. Only when using media blasting was I able to completely clean out the pits. Why is this important? The scale left inside the pits tends to re-activate in the presence of welding, such as someone fixing a couple holes from the outside, not knowing what lies in wait nearby. So although the holes showing from the outside appear to be manageable with a quick zap of the MIG, the inside view shows a completely different story, and demonstrates that this needs to be fixed properly BEFORE the paint goes on, lest you see more holes in a year or two. The next best part about media blasting, it will do a better job at finding weaker metal, ie: it was pitted and you're not sure whether to band aid it or not. If you have a couple holes showing, rest assured more are on the way.


[img]https://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y...20Restoration%20Album%203/Picture046.jpg[/img]



[img]https://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y...20Restoration%20Album%202/Picture546.jpg[/img]



My preference is to media blast any pits to clean metal, then make any repairs needed, up to and including replacement sheet metal. My experience has shown media blasting the best method to insure the pits are clean, as well as the best abrading method for either epoxy or powder coat adhesion. Now with the panel clean, you can decide whether this is a weld the pin holes closed or is it extensive enough to go ahead and weld in new metal. If we're still in the pin hole stage, as Kevin mentioned above a flat piece of copper does wonders to help control the heat and keep the weld in place without melting away more of the panel. If the area you're welding isn't perfectly flat, take a small section of copper pipe and flatten it with a hammer. This pipe is typically ductile enough that you can bend it to conform to the panel's shape...

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Moderated by  Fourbrads, HandyAndy 

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