Trey Tolbert's

1948 GMC 3/4-Ton Pickup Truck


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21 March 2007 Update
# 1725

From Trey :

          It looks like The 'Bolt Page keeps everyone busy!

          I have finally had time to take some decent pictures of the progress I have made on the truck. I have scratch-built a disk brake conversion for the front and replaced all the wheel bearings and seals. (Here is the front rotor and the caliper.) I also found a set of bias ply tires after about five months of searching. I found them at little tire shop in Bandera, Texas that had a full set sitting on their shelf for who knows how long.

          The rear axle had to be replaced. (Here is the new one.) I pulled the drain plug and all that came out was water. So it had been making a nice rust stew for the past decade or so.

          I fitted a 1995 2500HD axle (posi) with a 3.73 gear ratio so it should be a little more enjoyable to drive at highway speeds.

          It is just about complete. I just need to shorten the drive shaft then it should be ready to go. I am really looking forward to taking it for a spin.

          I have put in a new headliner (here's the before picture) and added new gauges. The interior is coming along.

          Take care and I will talk with you soon.

Trey Tolbert
"Treyz"
Bolter # 12603
San Antonio, Texas


21 November 2006
# 1725

From Trey :

          This 1948 GMC 3/4-ton truck has been used as our ranch truck since 1970. My family and friends of the family leased a ranch for the past 36 years and not everyone had a truck to get around the property. So, my Grandfather donated this truck to the ranch. As the years went by, everyone loved that old truck. The tall utility bed on the truck made an excellent place to sit as Dad or Grandpa would drive through the pasture and we would look for deer, rabbits, etc. When I was old enough to learn how to drive, I learned on that truck -- as did both of my sisters.

          When trucks became more popular to use as a everyday means of transportation in the mid '80s and many of the lease members bought trucks, they still drove this one to get around the ranch.

          My Grandfather enjoyed vehicles and kept the truck in great mechanical condition. My Grandfather passed on about 10 years ago and the truck's maintenance became my Dad's duty. He had a very different outlook on vehicles than my Grandfather did and the truck steadily deteriorated.

          My Dad bought a ranch of his own a few years back and mentioned getting off the lease. I told him I would like to get the truck if no one had any objections. He said that would be fine. Well, we moved since then and did not have a place to keep the truck. He called and said that he was getting off the lease and if I wanted the truck, I needed to come and get it. Since the truck no longer worked, he did not want it junking up his new ranch. When I told him that I no longer had a place to keep it, he mentioned it to my sister and she said she would take it and make a planter out of it. Basically, it would become an oversized flower pot.

          I had too many good memories tied up in that truck to watch it sit in my sister's yard and slowly dissolve. I talked to a friend of mine and he has a few acres near by and is letting me keep it there. I have the truck back in good running condition. The brakes are the next thing to tackle. They have not worked in about 10 years.

          My past time is restoring cars, mostly 1970's Datsun Z cars. I have worked on a few '56 and '57 Bel Air's as far as paint goes but this is the fist time I have really torn down a '40s model anything. I have really enjoyed it. Even though I am doing the restoration in my spare time (when I am not chasing around my two kids), it should go pretty fast.

          I will post pictures of the restoration progress. Once a week I go get parts off of it and strip prime and paint them during the week then re-install them on the weekend.

Trey Tolbert
"Treyz"
Bolter # 12603
San Antonio, Texas



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