Steven G. Poulo's

1939 Chevy 3/4-Ton Stakeside

"Farm Boy"


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20 June 2007 Update
# 1934

From Steve :

        Well, I made it to the May 19th car show in Pacifica, California and all I have to say is that “Farm Boy” ran like an old truck. With the clutch chatter and the uncontrollable 94 horses, it felt like it took forever to go the 60 mile round trip. It seems as if 50 mph is about the limit.

        A serious thought to my trip came in handy in finding the travel of least resistance. Steep stop signs are not a Farm Boy favorite!

        The weather was terrible that morning. The fog was so bad I realized the vacuum wipers needed to go and the next weekend I installed the electric motor I had ordered earlier.

        After arriving and taking in the local cars and trucks, I noticed that Farm Boy’s radiator had seeped a bit of coolant (lower right side of core). Not too serious to not drive it home again and I still had confidence to make a couple of stops along the way. I pulled the radiator after we got home and it is now being re-cored and will be re-installed soon.

Still many things on my “list of things to do” list. However I’ll get it done a little at a time.

Steven G. Poulo
"Farm Boy"
Bolter # 14769
Belmont, California


09 May 2007
# 1934

From Steve :

        What I have gotten my hands on here is a 1939 3/4-ton Chevrolet Stakeside. After not selling on eBay last March, I started correspondence with the seller and we had agreed on a sale price. He was located just short of 900 miles from where I resided. So it took me three weeks to clear the time to go make the drive to Washington.

        I started the trip at 3 am on a Friday and returned home 7 am Sunday. Even though we had to drag it out of its resting spot to winch it onto the trailer, it was definitely worth the trip. I left it on the trailer at my work while I freed up the brakes and got it running. It started easily and she purred like a kitten. I found out during our maiden voyage that the clutch was in dire need of work.

        I brought it home, drove it off the trailer and I haven't stopped tinkering with it since.

        The condition of the truck over all is very nice. Most everything is there on the vehicle. One door glass is cracked and the other looks as if it were chipped by a rock. There are only two small dents on the whole body. The paint (repaint) is faded, but a little compound and wax makes it look as if it were well kept.

        The previous owner updated the electrical to 12-volt with an alternator. He give me a box of replacement items he had ordered with the truck sale!

        I did a little cleaning here and there and then my parts started coming in. First, in went the new master cylinder, front wheel cylinders, the rear cylinders, shoes, rear brake hose and new drums. I spent an hour or two replacing the windshield seal and cowl vent seal to keep the approaching rain out.

        Next will be the front brakes as soon as the drums come in and after all the brakes are dialed in, it will be time for the clutch. I need to have this all done by May 19 so that I can take it to my first show.

        I don't have any major plans for this truck except making it a dependable daily driver when I can’t ride the Harley! I do nickname all my vehicles and “Farm Boy” is what I’ve been calling this one I since I bought it.

Steven G. Poulo
"Farm Boy"
Bolter # 14769
Belmont, California



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