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1936 Chev 1/2-Ton Holden Body



 


 

Bob Hunt
"doc bob"
Bolter # 17045
Waroona, Western Australia


 
01 April 2008 Update
# 2254

From Doc Bob :

           G’Day Fellow Stovebolters. A quick update on the progress on the 36 Chev Holden. Over the last month, all the body work and engine have been removed from the chassis, including the complete front running gear. This has been done so that I can fit a front end from a series 3 Jaguar sedan. I’m not sure if you have these British cars in the States …but they are a valuable resource for hot rodders over here. They have an excellent front end, independent rear, electric windows, remote mounted cable wipers and many other parts that are just right for modifying into other vehicles.

           I’ve thrown in a few photos (as I’m known to do!) of the Jag front sitting in the chassis. [ pix ] You would swear that Jaguar had the old Chevy in mind when they made these cross members as they seem to just fall into place! [ pix ]

           Once I removed the original front end, the chassis just dropped straight over the Jag unit. You can see how the original chassis is the exact shape as that of the Jaguar [ pix ] and lines up so well that it is almost invisible under the Chevy’s cross member when viewed from above.

           Now it is just a matter of deciding weather to mount it solid or retain the Jaguar rubber insulated mounts to soften out the ride a little. With these units, you get coil sprung double A arm suspension with anti-roll bar, power assisted rack and pinion steering, 11 inch vented disc brakes and HUGE 4 piston brake calipers. [ pix ]

           To match this, I will be fitting a Triangulated Four Link set up for the rear suspension. Nothing wrong with the old rear end, I just think it will be less maintenance and more comfortable to drive with the four link.

           And finally … before I get shot down in flames for “wrecking a good ol’ truck” ... I would like to remind you that we live in a VAST country. As such we drive many thousands of miles each year just going to the shops and to work! This pick-up will be driven daily for quite some miles and at a constant 65 to 70 miles an hour that is our open road limit here. Just to go to our nearest big shopping centre is a 50 minute drive at those speeds as soon as I leave my front gate ! If we lived in a city where it could be driven around comfortably, I would probably restore it … but we don’t !

           Anyrate … all the best. See you at the next update.

           PS - It is finally cooling off over here!

           Doc Bob ... you owe us no explanation as to what you want to do with YOUR truck. When you talk about a VAST country, it's a BIG STOVEBOLT WORLD, too ... and folks have different approaches to their truck. Looks like you've found something that will really make this a good daily driver! ~~ Editor

01 March 2008
# 2254

From Doc Bob :

           G'Day to you all at Stovebolt! This is my 1936 Chev 1/2-ton pickup that I acquired after spending many years searching this wide brown land for something worthy of putting much of my blood, sweat and tears into rebuilding. [ pix ] I managed to buy it from a young legal professional in our main city Perth. He had himself previously saved it from an old bloke who was looking to restore it. I only managed to get it from this young fella by promising not to "wreck or 'Rod it" ... which I did, with my fingers crossed behind my back !

           When I first seen it, there was only the bare chassis sitting there with the cab wrapped in a tarp sitting on top. The rest of the Chev was spread throughout the bloke's yard, buried in boxes under benches and even stashed away in the roof cavity of his shed! I had no idea how much of it was really there ... and neither did he. As it turned out, most of the parts I was told that were gone or missing, actually turned up stacked inside the tarp-sealed cab and under a pile of bits in the big wooden crate that served as the pickup bed on the back. Not until I got it all home and dummy assembled a few things that I realized the thing was pretty much 98.8888% complete and even had a few genuine 70 year old spares!

           The most interesting thing though is the difference between your US bodied Chevs, and that of our HOLDEN [ pix ] bodied Chevs we have here in Australia. I have noticed other Stovebolters on your site with reference to these vehicles, but not a great deal of photo's, etc. to show the differences. This is why I have included many snapshots of my '36 HOLDEN BODY PICK-UP for you guys to check out.

           As you will notice, they are quite a different body altogether in their height, width, styling, etc. Note the styling if the swage line through the cowl, doors and rear of cab. [ pix ] Also the truck has a complete different roof line, window openings and a lack of gutters over the windows. I've tried to cover as many angles and details in the photos that are specifically DIFFERENT in body, mechanical and interior.

           The width of the cab seems much wider as it doesn't taper down in line with the floor and running boards at the very rear of the cab. It is almost vertical from the roof to the floor. [ pix ]

           On the inside, you will notice the distinct lack of a glovebox, brass screw locks on the dash for the swing out front screen and no steel door trims. [ pix ]

           The doors are wood framed with a steel outer skin fitted, and utilise a steel mould for the top of the window.The story has it that HOLDEN used the timber from the shipping crates to build the door frames, etc. True or not, I don't know ... but it makes for a good yarn. [ pix ]

           This is obviously an ex-government / shire vehicle due to the amount of hot mix and bitumin over the running boards. Like a few other trucks I've seen, this one also has the homemade "Extra Cab Chassis" with 12 inches of extra channel welded to the rear. [ pix ]

           The final touches are the old STOVEBOLT motor itself. Note the clearance between starter and steering box as this is right-hand drive. [ pix ] Are these the oldest MALLORY leads [ pix ] still being used on this Planet?

           Finally, a happy snap [ pix ] of one of the original headlamps. If any one has a spare one, I'd love to hear from them. Failing that, I might have this one for sale !

           Well that's all for now. I'll update this as I go and you will get to see what the big plans are for this Jigger.

           Keep up the great work you are all doing with the web site. It's the best thing since sliced bread! I don't know how we'd survive without it.

All the best,

Doc Bob

           P.S. As I write this, it is 104F in the shade outside, heading for an overnight low of 84F. That is why I work in the shed at nights!

           Thanks for all the details Doc. It's good to get more info on those Holden body Chev's. Thanks for sweating it out! Even in the dark, looks like you've got quite the find! Keep us posted. ~ Editor

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