Steve Hall's

1966 Chevy C-10

"Red"


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14 August 2006 Update
# 1526

 

From Steve:

           This tree came down on Friday night (early August) during a storm. One tree in the whole yard. One truck on the yard. You figure the odds!! But, ha! The ol' girl is a real beast - no more than a couple of scratches.

Steve Hall
Bolter # 11190
Clemson, South Carolina

           This was our second Stovebolter to recently report a tree clunking down on his old truck. Looks like Steve made out better than the other guy! ~~ Editor


15 May 2006
# 1526

From Steve:

           Hello! In January of this year (2006) I became the proud owner of a 1966 Chevy C10. At that time, "Red" was locked up in my Father-in-law's workshop and had not been run for about five years (when it was pushed into the workshop, the fuel pump was blown). The transfer was made from him to me on the basis of restoration. My Father-in-law switched out the fuel pump long before the transfer was made, but there as still a large amount of work that needed to be done. Since my wife and I live about an hour and a half away, we (my Father-in-law) and I were limited to working just a day or two at a time.

           The first thing we did was pull the radiator, fan and generator. There were some holes in the radiator that my Father-in-law was able to patch up. He also put in a new drain valve, as the original was broken (i.e. destroyed) when we went to drain it. After that, we replaced the timing chain, as that had grown to have a significant amount of slack in it over the years.

           Then the dirty work began. We pulled the valve covers, heads, intake manifold and exhaust manifold. Everything was cleaned by hand. All carbon deposits were removed from the valves, the small amount of rust inside the cylinders, and five years of dirt and grime. When reassembly time came around, an entire new set of gaskets were put on. Head, valve, exhaust - everything. The carb was also leaking gas, so we rebuilt that.

           The brakes were also an issue. The shoes (4-wheel drum) were worn out and the cylinders were completely corroded. The front two wheel cylinders were replaced. I recommend to anyone that needs to replace the front cylinders to try and reuse the old bleeder screws if you can. The new cylinder had very short bleeder screws, and because of the positioning of the cylinder itself, they proved to be very difficult to bleed just in terms of access. Unfortunately, finding the proper size cylinders for the rear proved to be a difficult task and we settled with rebuilding those. All of the brake shoes were also replaced.

           May 14th, 2006, was the first time Red had been driven in several years. She made it to the gas station with no problem - didn't event stall on us. The brakes need to be adjusted just a little (they are a little soft for a half-ton truck, in my opinion) and there is still a very small oil leak somewhere. I think that leak may be coming from the oil pan gasket, or the plug itself. We didn't do much of anything on the bottom half of the engine, so I'm hoping that is where the problem lies rather than in something we did. I'm wondering as well if the master master cylinder is leaking just a little.

           Nonetheless, Red made the hour and thirty minute drive to Clemson, SC on the same day as her maiden voyage to the gas station. She ran beautifully. My wife followed me and said there was a little smoke from the tailpipe -- when I shifted -- but that was it. Overall, it was a surprisingly good drive.

           What's this truck got, you ask? This '66 was a bare bones model. There is not a single power feature on it. The tranny is three on the tree and under the hood is a resurrected 283. Fortunately, Red has been more or less in the family for its entire life. I was given the original owner's manual (complete with the factory stamped metal warranty card), the original key for the ignition, and the sticker from when it was bought. Interestingly enough, in 1966 the truck cost $2300 (according to the sticker) and the heater was extra.

           While going through the old paper work, I happened to come across the old inspection receipts. Presently, inspection is no longer required in SC but I've got all of the receipts from when it was. Since the odometer has 5 digits, the true mileage on the engine is best represented by the old inspection receipts - which, upon the last inspection, was written down at over 500K miles. Currently the odometer has 90K on it. Does that mean that this engine has 590K miles on it? It may very well.

           Now, the real question is: what's next for Red? Eventually, she'll be repainted a deep red color and I'll probably keep the interior tan (similar as it is). Somewhere down the line, a wooden bed will replace the sheet metal that's welded in it right now.

Steve Hall
Bolter # 11190
Clemson, South Carolina



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